Teach Your Child Athlete Healthy Perspectives

Despite all that so many parents do for their children’s athletic pursuits, they often fail to provide them with the foundation of all of their efforts: perspective.

Five Ways to Get Coaches and Parents on the Same Side

Across the many sports in which I work, when I ask coaches what their biggest challenge and source of stress is, the overwhelming response is parents.

Set Healthy Expectations for Your Young Athlete

Expectations communicate messages to your children about what’s important to you about their sports participation and establish a standard toward which they can strive.

Create a Vocabulary for Individual and Team Success in Sport

Children become the messages they get the most. The words you use with athletes are powerful influences on the way they think, feel, behave, and performance.

Build a Team Culture for Athletic Success

How team members, think, feel, behave, and perform are all influenced by the environment in which they practice and compete.

Four Reasons Why Sport Coaches Don’t Do Mental Training

Great sport coaches are also great intuitive psychologists who develop a deep understanding of the importance of the mind and help their athletes be mentally prepared.

Watching Video Is Great Mental Training

Watching videos of yourself and the best athletes in the world in your sport is a powerful tool for strengthening important mental muscles such as confidence, intensity, and focus.

For Athletic Success, You Pay Now or Pay Later

You’re going to pay for what you do or do not do in your conditioning in one way or another. You can pay now with temporary fatigue and pain or you can pay later in lasting regret.

Strengthen Your Confidence Muscle Like a Champion

Confidence is the most important mental muscle because you may have all of the ability to perform your best, if you don’t believe in that ability, you won’t use that ability.

How Athletes Can Take Risks That Pay Off

It never feels like the right time to take risks in sports because there are risks to taking risks, primarily that of failure. Yet, only by taking risks can athletes find success.

Take Risks for Athletic Success

Risk taking means pushing your limits, getting out of your comfort zone, and confronting failure, so that, when the risk pays off, you will experience sports success.

3 Keys to Making Mental Training Work in Sports

Athletes and coaches tell me that the mind is as or more important than the physical and technical side of sports. Yet, in reality, it is woefully under-appreciated and neglected.

5 Mental Tools for Athletic Success

These five mental tools enable you to focus them entirely on what you need to do to perform your best when it counts most, namely, in your biggest competitions of the season.

5 Mental “Muscles” for Athletic Success

You should think about your mind as made up of ‘mental muscles’, the same way you think about your body and its physical muscles. y

Practice Is the Foundation of Athletic Success

To be the best athlete you can be, you must be serious about your practice in every area that impacts your athletic performances—physical, technical, and mental.

Five Mental Obstacles That Prevent Sport Success

Mental obstacles refer to any psychological or emotional issue that interferes with your ability to perform your best consistently in the biggest competitions of your life.

7 Things Parents Can Do at the End of a Sports Season

The conclusion of a sports season can be a time of excitement, relief, and suffering for parents of athletes.

5 Attitudes You Need for Athletic Success

The dictionary definition of attitude is “The way you think and feel about something.” You hold attitudes about your sport that have a direct impact on how you perform.

4 Reasons Why Your Kids Should Play Sports

As any parent of young athletes knows, having your children participate in sports can be a real hassle.

5 Keys to Playing Your Best on Game Day

What do you need to do to play your best on game day? Here are 5 areas that I've learned from world-class and professional athletes.

A Sports Dad’s Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Great Day

We don’t live life in retrospect. If we could look into the future and know how our decisions will turn out, life would be easy…and quite uninteresting.

Every Day Can Be a Good Day of Sports Training

One of the most frequent comments I hear from the athletes I work with is: “I had a lousy day of training.” This statement is accompanied by bad-feeling emotions.

An Olympic Champion’s Holiday Gift #3: Risk

Risk taking is essential for success in sports. You just can’t play it safe and expect to win. Taking risks can mean the difference between goals achieved and hopes dashed.

Psychological Rehab After Sports Injury

When athletes get injured, their minds get damaged too, yet little attention is paid to the importance of “mental rehab” to a complete and timely recovery and return to sport.

An Olympic Champion’s Holiday Gift #2: Fight

It’s normal to get nervous before a competition, particularly a big one. You’re putting all of your efforts on the line and you want to succeed really badly.

An Olympic Champion’s 3 Holiday Gifts: #1 is Disappointment

No one likes to be disappointed. Your heart aches for the opportunity lost. But not allowing yourself to feel disappointed is another opportunity lost and a lesson not learned.

Sports Just Don’t Make Sense

Sports just don’t make sense. They don’t always go the way we want them to. Sports can be so frustrating. To the point where it’s easy to wonder why we devote so much time and energy to it. Let’s look at why sports don’t make sense. Sports are complex. Sports are unpredictable and uncontrollable. Nothing comes quick and easy in sports. Progress isn’t steady.

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

The Real Fear in Fear of Failure: Part III

The real fear is not failure, the meaning you attach to failure, or even total failure. Instead, the real fear of failure is about the fear of experiencing the painful emotions that young people think they will suffer if they fail.

Is the American Academy of Pediatrics Copping Out on Screens

Increasing the limits allowed for kids’ screen time or not offering time limits at all, either of which seem to be directions that the AAP is considering, flies in face of the fact that kids these days are already way out of balance in their use of technology.