Bring your imagination to work

The pace of change in the work world is increasing exponentially at a dramatic rate. A report highlights a startling prediction "that we will face the equivalent of all the milestones of the 20th century--world wars, creation of the automobile, sequencing of DNA, rise of the Internet, etc.,--in a single week in the year 2025."

What Happens When Your Dreams No Longer Serve You?

At various times in your life, you'll find that your dreams have deserted you. They've gone into hibernation or disappeared all together--daydreams of success or desire that fueled your motivation, or dreams and visions of a life that embodied your innermost authentic self.

Tuning into Daydreams for Career Direction

If you want to work at something you love, don't ignore the spontaneous thoughts and images that come to you when you imagine yourself at work. Okay, you might not be a rock star, but you could work in event promotion. You might not be an actress, but you might be happy in advertising or PR.

Mind Wandering Enhances Creative Problem Solving

Lately I've been accused of "obsessing" about a pesky financial problem. Not a gigantic problem, but a source of ongoing irritation and minor conflict. At any rate, this financial quandry got into my mind, and I found myself waking up thinking about it, thinking about it while auto-piloting through my morning get-ready-for-work routine, and defaulting to it during random periods of mind wandering. It's common to default to thoughts that carry the most emotional punch, and this one was pulling anger triggers.

Dealing with Worry-Based Fantasies and Daydreams

“Daymare” is an old-fashioned word straight out of Charles Dickens. The word is not in use much anymore, but it certainly captures the stressful aspect of frightening and worry-based visions that plague many people on a regular basis.

Sparking Creativity in the Workplace

Admit it. When do you get your best ideas? When you're sitting at your desk striving for an answer, or when you're doing something off-task like driving, walking, or puttering around the house? On the surface, daydreaming seems like the antithesis of "work," yet it's truly at the core of our most important type of productivity--creative problem-solving. That's why some of the most innovative companies in the world feature programs that give key employees the time and space to think creatively, i.e. daydream--Google offers a 20% program, 3M has a 15% program, and Gore & Associates (Gore-Tex, etc.) features "dabble time." All three companies credit these programs as the source of their most successful products.

The Dynamic Duo: Imagination + Knowledge

Isn't it great when a study confirms what you already suspected? There's a significant correlation between robust daydreaming and superior intelligence.

How to Work Your Daydreams

It's funny what cyclical creatures we are. Every year, I along with a zillion others pledge to do all kinds of righteous things in January, the New Year and season of fresh starts. Of course many of these cyclical goals spring from long-nurtured, long-held visions, fantasies, and daydreams of what we want to be. Whatever you daydream about-try to see the goal of the daydream and take note of how it motivates you.

How to Use Your Imagination to Fortify Yourself for the Holidays

You can use your everyday creativity in obvious ways to help you get the most out of holiday get-togethers--from the way you dress, to what food or gifts you bring, to how you choose to respond to any verbal gauntlets thrown. You can also get creative in advance by tapping into your powers of imagination to visualize your response to stressful situations and to help strengthen your overall sense of well being.

Our Capacity for Interruption or . . . How We Get Away with Daydreaming

At least the two Northwest Airlines pilots who flew 150 miles past their appointed runaway didn't claim "daydreaming" as a distraction. Instead, they asserted that they were caught up in doing business on their laptops.

Daydreams as a Source of Innovation & Motivation

The most dynamic and innovative people in any endeavor--business, science, athletics, politics, or the arts--are visionaries. And what exactly is a "vision?" At the end of the day I argue that a "vision" is just an upscale word for "daydream," and "visionary," an upscale word for daydreamer. . . . When people say they "dream" of being president or a billionaire or an artist or whatever it is they fantasize about--they are daydreaming those goals, literally envisioning them in their mind's eye.

"Aha" Moments Caught on Tape

Research has caught on "tape" the moment of insight that comes to us in a daydreaming state of mind. These are the proverbial "aha," "eureka!" or "light bulb" moments of discovery that come to us whether it's something simple like suddenly remembering the name of an old friend or some truly innovative insight like the key to a new computer program.

Wishing and hoping and dreaming . . .

We daydream for a variety of reasons, and one reason is that daydreams give us hope and help us get through the rough and boring patches of life. This isn't a small thing. All of us face our challenging days, and without the capacity to envision a brighter future or new goals, life would be bleak indeed. Could it be that when the world goes flat and gray that our daydreams have ceased to work their magic and the world looks one-dimensional, without possibilities, without hope?

How Music Feeds and Steers Your Imagination

Some people have auditory daydreams, in other words, instead of primarily visualizing a scene or creation, they hear the "sounds of music." Even for those of us who are more visual in our imaginings--music remains one of the most powerful daydream launchers. In fact, it's so powerful, I sometimes avoid listening to it at certain times because I know it has the power to send my thoughts in a very particular direction. Here are some ways music affects your mood, creativity, and energy levels.

Cathartic and Do-Over Daydreams

Cathartic "do-over" daydreams help us blow off steam and deal with difficult emotions like shame, guilt, frustration, and anger.

Are Your Daydreams Stuck in a Rut?

Daydreaming and fantasizing are great ways to explore options, escape the routines of daily life, and find outlets for intense emotion. But sometimes even your daydreams can get stuck in a rut. Check out seven ways to jump-start your imagination.

The Great Paradox: Daydreaming vs. Mindfulness

To daydream or not to daydream

What's Your Attitude Toward Daydreaming?

It's time to rethink old-school attitudes toward daydreaming.