Occasionally the weekend arrives and all we want to do is binge watch, sleep, and veg out. This is understandable because we’ve worked hard, had relationship or parenting stress and could use a break. Often, we respond to this stress by isolating, avoiding activities and time with friends which is a recipe for disaster. In fact, research shows that mood can be improved with anticipation and engagement with “mood brightening” activities!1

Pexels
Source: Pexels

Having a great weekend isn’t tied to being able to afford a luxurious trip or being invited to a fancy party. It’s all about spending time with people you enjoy and finding gratitude for what you have.

This weekend I’m focusing on these three things:

  1. Gratitude: Telling those I love how and why I am appreciative of them
  2. Physical activity: Going to a trampoline park and getting my heart rate up in a fun way
  3. Mindfulness: Simply spending 10 minutes with my eyes closed focusing on my breath

In my book, Life As Sport, I talk about how to play life like a sport. By fully engaging in the moment and practicing science-based relaxation and activity you too can win the weekend.

Dr. Fader is a sport and performance psychologist at SportStrata and Union Square Practice

References

1. Starr & Hershenberg (2017) Depressive Symptoms And the Anticipation and Experience of Uplifting Events in Everyday Life. Journal of Clinical Psychology. 

About the Author

Jonathan Fader, Ph.D.

Jonathan Fader, Ph.D., is a psychologist and an assistant professor of family medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

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