Mindfulness for Introverts

Projecting a sense of ownership onto our experience gives rise to a pervasive sense of dissatisfaction since that experience cannot be pinned down with language or fixed in time. The combination of introvert self-care through mindfulness and access to a wider wisdom (also facilitated through mindfulness) can help introverts to be happier, more engaged, and energized.

There Is No Such Thing as an Introvert or Extrovert

While Jung is famous for saying no one is a pure introvert or pure extrovert, I will go beyond this to say there is no such thing as an introvert (or an extrovert). Most of us have a healthy mix of both introvert and extrovert tendencies with one set predominating overall or in particular circumstances, such as how we are at work.

Solitary But Not Lonely

I recently taught a weekend workshop at the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies in Barre, Massachusetts called Solitary but Not Lonely: Empowering Going Within in an Extroverted Culture. We explored the relationship between introversion and the dharma--the Buddha's teaching and the truths these teachings point to.

Introverts Are Not Failed Extroverts

Shame, and its feelings of inadequacy, is a reasonable response to feeling like a failed extrovert. Of course, introverts are not failed extroverts as the burgeoning literature on introverts is demonstrating. Nevertheless, introverts may confront these feelings in a number of different situations.

A Time to Wait; A Time to Act

Introverts, by definition, will be more prone towards pausing and reviewing information before acting. The addition of mindfulness creates a powerful dimension to the introvert's predilection towards hesitation. Instead of getting caught up in the stickiness of interior conversations, mindfulness allows introverts to be at home in the mind.

2013: The Year of the Introvert

The Holidays can be a challenging time for introverts. Forced, intensive socialzing from office parties to family gatherings. You may be feeling exhausted just about now and are looking forward to the New Year and the quiet it will have to offer after the tumult of tonight.

Quiet as a Double-Edged Sword

For introverts, this degree of silence is a double-edged sword. One edge is welcome relief from the frenzied, loud, and chaotic extrovert circus. The other edge is being left alone with one’s mind with no distractions. Here, there is the risk of falling into and reinforcing the stories in our minds.

If Introverts Ruled the World

The introvert version of the Third Noble Truth can start to be realized when introverts recognize there is an alternative to the extrovert ideal. Here are some rules that can help with cessation of the extrovert hegemony we confront everyday.

Are Extroverts Really Happier?

Think about the Buddha’s version of happiness. He is often represented, half-smiling, with a supreme countenance of calm, presence, and forbearance. On the night of his awakening when he was asked by his cynical mind: “who would witness his accomplishment?” he didn’t speak aloud. He simply reached down and touched the ground. A very introvert thing to do.

An Introvert’s Guide to Reality

In this post, we’ll explore the Three Marks of Existence, which include dukkha. We’ll take a look at how dukkha (often translated as suffering, stress, or anguish) interacts the other two marks: the Buddha’s important and often-misunderstood notion of not self and the easier to grasp but often hard to appreciate principle of impermanence.

The Four Noble Truths, Introvert Style

Introverts have a different flavor to their stress and must undergo a double-process of liberation. First, we must liberate ourselves from the extrovert hegemony. The challenge is to peel away the sense of what normal and happy is as defined from the perspective of extroverts: outgoing, boisterous, fun-loving, and quick thinking, talking, and acting.

From Pseudo-Extrovert to Quiet Community Organizer

The Buddha’s life story reflects some of the challenges that introverts face today. There is some suggestion that the future Buddha, was an introverted child. When he was born, a Brahmin priest prophesized that he’d either be a great mystic or great king. Only an introvert could pull off both of these occupations where quiet leadership is required.

The Buddha Was an Introvert

There is some suggestion that the future Buddha, was an introverted child. When he was born, a Brahmin priest prophesied that he’d either be a great mystic or great king. Only an introvert could pull off both of these occupations where quiet leadership is required.