Need a Midday Energy Boost? Skip the Caffeine, Take a Walk

Brief bouts of low-to-moderate intensity physical activity are more energizing than a 50 mg dose of caffeine (such as a can of soda or shot of espresso), according to a new study.

Beyond Recess: Synchronized Play Improves Kids' Cooperation

We all know the elated feeling of swinging side-by-side with someone in synchrony. Now, researchers have identified unexpected benefits of synchronized movement during childhood.

A Wide Range of Mental Disorders May Have Link to Cerebellum

A first-of-its-kind study from Duke University has identified a previously unknown link between the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") and multiple mental health disorders.

What Do the Latest Plastic Surgery Statistics Say About Us?

In 2016, Americans spent more money on elective plastic surgery and non-invasive cosmetic treatments than at any other time in our nation's history. What exactly are we "fixing"?

These 5 Life Skills Boost Well-Being as We Age, Study Finds

A new study identifies 5 life skills correlated with increased psychological, physical, and fiscal well-being. Notably, each of these life skills was found to be equally important.

The Power of Awe: "A Star Is Born" Images and the Small Self

New mind-blowing photographs of a star being born 500 years ago reaffirm the "awesome" power of nature to promote self-transcendence, the small self, and prosocial behaviors.

MIT Scientists Identify Brain Circuits of Memory Formation

MIT neuroscientists have discovered previously unknown brain circuitry necessary for memory formation. These revolutionary findings defy traditional memory consolidation models.

Pop Music Shows That Our Attention Spans Are Getting Shorter

Do you fast forward if a song's intro doesn't grab your attention quickly? Since the 1980s, musical intros are much shorter due to a competitive "attention economy," study finds.

5 New Studies Report Previously Unknown Cerebellum Functions

For centuries, most neuroscientists thought the cerebellum didn't play a role in human cognition. This outdated viewpoint is rapidly changing due to advances in modern technology.

The Split-Brain: An Ever-Changing Hypothesis

In 2005, I created a new split-brain model with my father, Richard Bergland, who was a neuroscientist. Since his death, I've updated these blueprints to reflect the latest science.

Cerebellum Stimulation Influences Frontal Cortex Functioning

Stimulating the cerebellum normalizes frontal cortex activity in lab rats with abnormal dopamine processing, a new study reports. These findings could have many human applications.

Real-World Neuroscience Research Promotes Human Interactions

Pioneering neuroscientists are taking their research out of the lab and into the real-world. Recent "Out of the Lab" studies illuminate the importance of face-to-face eye contact.

Disney Research Pioneers New Frontiers Using Virtual Reality

Walt Disney researchers are fine-tuning virtual reality (VR) technologies that could be used to improve athletic performance and many other "proprioception-based" daily activities.

Stanford Scientists Discover Surprising Cerebellum Functions

A pioneering Stanford University study has discovered a previously unknown cognitive role of specific neurons in the historically overlooked cerebellum (Latin for "little brain").

Intellectual Humility Augments Nonpartisan Open-Mindedness

Regardless of your party or religious beliefs, new research from Duke shows that intellectual humility may be the key to breaking down barriers that divide us.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

More Proof That Skin-to-Skin Contact Benefits Babies' Brains

Growing evidence suggests that skin-to-skin contact plays a significant role in healthy childhood brain development for all newborns, but especially for babies born prematurely.

Harvard Study Finds Genetic ‘Toggle Switch’ for Sociability

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have pinpointed specific neuronal circuitry and a 'toggle switch' that can turn a mouse's sociability "on" and "off" in the laboratory.

Long-Term Use of ADHD Medications May Suppress Adult Height

Extended long-term use of medications to treat ADHD is associated with suppression of adult height by age 25, according to a new longitudinal study.

Poetry Lights Up Your Brain Like a Favorite Song, fMRI Shows

New research on the link between happy or scary musical cues—and the difference between reading poetry or prose—offer new clues about how the brain responds to music and poetry.

Genetics Play a Role in Social Anxiety Disorder, Study Finds

A new study has pinpointed a genetic link between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and a serotonin transporter gene called "SLC6A4."

Physical Activity May Be a Drug-Free Elixir for Chronic Pain

Lower levels of sedentary behavior and higher levels of physical activity may be critical for maintaining effective endogenous pain inhibitory function, according to a new study.

Mayo Clinic Study Identifies How Exercise Staves Off Old Age

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have discovered that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a fountain of youth for people of all ages.

Social Media Exacerbates Perceived Social Isolation

A new study reports that heavy use of social media is associated with increased social isolation.

Yoga Helps Reduce Symptoms of Depression, Study Finds

Practicing yoga and yogic breathing a few times a week can reduce symptoms of major depressive disorder, according to new research.

Study Finds Mechanism That Controls Brain's Information Flow

Neuroscientists have identified specialized nerve cells that act like a "switchboard" to control information flow in the cerebral cortex.

The Cerebellum May Play Unforeseen Role in Driving Addiction

For the first time, a new comprehensive review puts the cerebellum in the spotlight as a central player behind the neurobiology that drives drug addiction.

Regular Aerobic Exercise in Midlife Protects the Aging Brain

Regular aerobic exercise benefits the brain in surprising ways. New research suggests that regular aerobic exercise in midlife can optimize blood flow networks as the brain ages.

Highly Creative People Have Well-Connected Brain Hemispheres

People who are highly creative have better connectivity between the left and right brain hemispheres, according to a new study by a team of international researchers.

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

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