The Neuroscience of Forming New Memories

In a breakthrough study, an international team of neuroscientists has identify how new memories are formed by individual neurons.

How Does Your Circadian Clock Keep Track of the Seasons?

Until now, the specific neurobiology of how our circadian clocks keep track of the seasons has been a mystery. Recently, researchers identified how circadian rhythms synchronize with the seasons. These findings could lead to new treatments for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and insomnia.

How Does Scent Drive Human Behavior?

Researchers have identified how specific scents can motivate your decision making.

Physically Active Children Grow Up to Be Healthier Adults

Why are children who exercise regularly more likely to remain healthy and fit into adulthood?

Why Do Teens Assume Vaping or Smoking Marijuana Is Harmless?

A new study from Stanford University Medical Center reports that adolescents commonly assume that "vaping" e-cigarettes or smoking marijuana is harmless. Why do so many teenagers underestimate the risks of e-cigarettes and smoking cannabis?

Sitting All Day Increases Your Risk of Anxiety

A new study reports that excessive sitting can increase your risk of anxiety.

How Do Various Cortisol Levels Impact Cognitive Functioning?

Having just the right amount of cortisol in your bloodstream appears to optimize childhood cognitive functioning. What is the secret to finding the sweet spot between too much cortisol or too little cortisol?

Increasing Physical Movement Reduces Symptoms of ADHD

New research shows that physical movement may improve cognitive control for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Do You Have a Family Snapshot and Memory of the Twin Towers?

Do you have a snapshot and memory of the original World Trade Center or Twin Towers prior to September 11, 2001? "My WTC" is creating a blog archive of personal photographs of the former World Trade Center in an effort to preserve the meaning and significance of the WTC from the intimate vantage point of New Yorkers, visitors, and tourists from all over the world.

3 Ways Pessimism About Future Possibilities Fuels Depression

A new study reports that having a pessimistic attitude about "possible futures" isn't simply the result of depression. Pessimism about possible futures may be a leading cause of depression.

Hippocrates Was Right: "Walking Is the Best Medicine"

If you hate to exercise, I have good news. You don't necessarily have to exert yourself to reap huge benefits from physical activity. Researchers have found that small doses of light-intensity exercise—such as an easy walk or taking the stairs—are extremely good for your health.

Why Do Certain Blood Types Have a Higher Risk of Dementia?

Neuroscientists have discovered that your blood type may impact brain volume in regions linked to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

What Are the Eleven Symptoms of "Alcohol Use Disorder"?

New research has found that alcohol use disorder (AUD) is an often untreated epidemic in the United States. Do you have an alcohol use disorder? This blog post highlights the 11 symptoms of AUD currently being used to assess both alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.

The Cerebellum May Be the Seat of Creativity

In a revolutionary discovery, new research from Stanford University published on May 28, 2015 reports that the cerebellum may be the seat of creativity.

"Surf Therapy" and Being in the Ocean Can Alleviate PTSD

Recently I spoke with filmmaker Josh Izenberg about his new documentary "Resurface." The short film is about military veterans who learn to surf as a way to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and transform their lives.

How Does Yoga Relieve Chronic Pain?

Chronic pain triggers changes in brain structure that are linked to depression, anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. New research shows that yoga can have the opposite effect on the brain as chronic pain.

The Wacky Neuroscience of Forgetting How to Ride a Bicycle

A new experiment with a "backwards brain bicycle" illustrates how easy it is to forget everything you thought you knew about riding a bicycle. In this blog post, I'll explore the neuroscience behind learning—and forgetting—how to ride a bicycle.

The Power of Awe: A Sense of Wonder Promotes Loving-Kindness

A new study led by researchers at the University of California reports that having a sense of wonder and being in awe of something greater than oneself promotes loving-kindness and prosocial behavior.

Cannabis Addiction Is Linked to Higher Levels of Cortisol

Heavy marijuana use may trigger a stress response that increases cortisol levels.

How Do Drugs Hijack Your Brain?

Occasional use of certain drugs can trigger structural changes in your brain that make some people more likely to become addicts.

Very Small Amounts of Exercise Can Reap Huge Benefits

If you are someone who hates to exercise, I have good news. Two different studies published in May 2015 report that small amounts of "light-intensity" physical activity can dramatically improve your health and longevity.

Why's It So Hard to Quit Smoking? Neuroscience Has New Clues

Neuroscientists have pinpointed specific brain regions that explain why smoking is one of the hardest habits to kick.

One Billion People Share This Addiction. Are You Among Them?

The global statistics on substance abuse and addiction are surprising. One billion people around the world share a common addiction. Are you one of them?

Multilingual Environments Enrich Our Understanding of Others

Even if you're not bilingual, exposure to multiple languages improves the ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes and see the world from another perspective.

Why Do Drunk People Stumble, Fumble, and Slur Their Words?

Neuroscientists have identified why drinking too much alcohol makes people discombobulated.

Carpe Diem! 30 Reasons to Seize the Day and How to Do It

These 30 motivational phrases will inspire you to seize the day.

How Do Your Genes Influence Levels of Emotional Sensitivity?

Neuroscientists have identified a specific gene variation that causes some people to be more emotionally sensitive.

How Do Sleeplessness and Insomnia Sabotage Decision Making?

New research reveals how sleeplessness can thwart your ability to make astute decisions.

12 Ways Eye Movements Give Away Your Secrets

Eye movements unconsciously give away your secret personal information.

The Neuroscience of Making a Decision

Understanding how your brain makes decisions in the heat-of-the-moment leads to more positive outcomes.

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