Nonconformity Has Counter-Intuitive Benefits, Study Finds

A new study reports that going along with a group—whose viewpoints you are diametrically opposed to—triggers a physiological threat response.

Deconstructing Ryan Lochte's Shame and Fear of Vulnerability

Ryan Lochte is in the hot seat for his shameful after-hours behavior in Rio last weekend. Is his apology for "not being more candid and careful" enough to appease his shame?

The Neuroscience of Going from Machiavellian to Magnanimous

Why would four U.S. Olympic swimmers fabricate a story about being robbed at gunpoint in Rio de Janeiro? A new Oxford study explains the brain mechanics of self-serving behavior.

Michael Phelps’ Heroic Journey Goes Far Beyond Gold Medals

Michael Phelps is the most-decorated Olympian of all time. He's also a role model for sharing intimate details of how he completed the hero's journey after hitting rock bottom.

Study: If You Believe in Exercise, It'll Make You Feel Good

Do you consider physical activity to be a source of joy or pure torture? If you hate to exercise, research suggests that you might be creating a self-fulfilling prophecy.

3 Ways Aerobic Exercise Improves Schizophrenia Symptoms

A groundbreaking report, published this morning, identifies three specific ways that aerobic exercise improves cognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia.

One Drug-Free Way to Reduce Your Risk of 5 Chronic Diseases

A study published today offers a drug-free prescriptive that could reduce your risk of 5 chronic diseases. The best news: this remedy is inexpensive and universally accessible.

The Neuroprotective Powers of Exercise Should Motivate You

Do you need a new source of motivation to become more physically active? If so, there is growing evidence that exercise increases brain size and reduces dementia risk as you age.

Study: The Male Warrior Hypothesis May Be Real

Why are male athletes more likely to be touchy-feely after a sports competition than their female counterparts? A new study from Harvard University offers some interesting clues.

Curiosity: The Good, the Bad, and the Double-Edged Sword

Eleanor Roosevelt described curiosity as "the most useful gift." But, new research suggests that curiosity is a doubled-edged sword that has a dark side.

The No. 1 Way to Stay Alive and Well in a Digital Age

Do you spend at least 8 hours a day sitting in front of a computer screen? If so, a new study offers a simple way you can compensate for the detrimental impacts of sedentarism.

Neuroimaging Captures Four Hidden Stages of Problem Solving

State-of-the-art neuroimaging technology allows researchers to capture complex cognitive functions on film. A new study identifies four previously hidden stages of problem solving.

Yes, You Can Do It! Self-Control May Be an Infinite Resource

Researchers are beginning to question the notion that self-control is a depletable resource. This is good news for anyone looking for inspiration and motivation to seize the day.

Why Is Poor Balance Strongly Correlated With Dementia Risk?

A first-of-its-kind study has identified a strong link between poor balance and the risk of dementia in older age. What is the neuroscience behind this correlation?

Your Eyes Are a Window Into the Inner Workings of Your Brain

William Shakespeare is credited with observing, "Eyes are the window to the soul." A new study goes one step farther by showing how your eyes are a window into your brain.

Two (Often Overlooked) Ways to Improve Your Quality of Life

Do you want to improve your quality of life, but don't know where to begin? If so, I have good news. A study published today offers two practical ways to improve quality of life.

The New Science of Empathic Accuracy Could Transform Society

Contrary to popular belief, new research shows that the ability to interpret other people's emotions accurately requires more cerebral thinking and less intuition.

Why Do Run-Down Schools Trigger Lower Test Scores?

A new study from Cornell University identifies a chain reaction that occurs in run-down schools which results in lower test scores for students from all walks of life.

Epigenetic Mechanism in the Cerebellum Drives Motor Learning

New research pinpoints how we learn new motor skills such as riding a bicycle, playing the piano, driving a car, etc.

Harvard Study Pegs How Parental Substance Abuse Impacts Kids

A new Harvard study, published today, reports that 1 in 5 children grows up in a home with parental substance abuse. The study offers advice on how to break the cycle of addiction.

Dad's Psychological Well-Being Impacts His Kids' Development

New research illuminates the impact a father's stress levels and mental health have on his children.

Study: Genes May Determine What Diet Works for You

Your genetic composition might determine what specific foods are healthiest for you to eat, according to groundbreaking research being presented at a conference in Orlando today.

Too Much Artificial Light Exposure Can Make You Sick

New research shows that the last century of artificial light pollution is an environmental hazard that is causing our circadian rhythms to go haywire.

Want to Build Strength and Gain Muscle? Lift Lighter Weights

If you want to gain physical strength and build muscle—lifting lighter weights can be just as effective as lifting heavy weights, according to a new study.

5 Ways Outdoor Learning Optimizes Children's Well-Being

New research has pinpointed five ways that outdoor learning benefits children's overall well-being.

Rageaholics Have Less Brain Connectivity Between Key Regions

People suffering from Intermittent Explosive Disorder (also known as "rageaholics") have atypical brain connectivity, according to a new study.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Dramatically Reduces Inflammation

There is growing evidence that stimulating the vagus nerve can improve well-being in many ways—including the reduction of chronic inflammation.

One Motivational Technique Really Works (And It's Easy!)

A massive new study has pinpointed the most effective motivational technique for improving performance—and it’s incredibly easy.

"Peripatetic Meetings" Promote Health and Creative Thinking

New research shows that holding a "peripatetic meeting" (in which you walk instead of sit) improves physical well-being and boosts creativity.

Superfluidity: The Science and Psychology of Optimizing Flow

Have you ever had a 'flow' experience that felt as if you were "standing outside yourself"? The science and psychology of 'superfluidity' help to explain the highest tier of flow.

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