Want to Improve Your Cognitive Abilities? Go Climb a Tree!

A new study has discovered that physical activities, such as climbing a tree or balancing on a beam, can dramatically improve cognitive abilities. Why would climbing a tree improve cognitive function and working memory?

5 Strategies to Reduce Gender Bias Against Girls As Leaders

These 5 stategies for reducing gender bias were recently developed by researchers at Harvard University. These 5 easy tips have the potential to close the gender gap in leadership for teenage girls in the future.

Music Training Improves Adolescent Brain Development

Music training during adolescence helps the teenage brain hone skills necessary for academic and life success.

The Neuroscience of Savoring Positive Emotions

Neuroscientists have linked sustained activation of a brain region called the ventral striatum to savoring positive emotions. Ventral striatal activation is in the locus of your control. Researchers believe that regularly practicing loving-kindness meditation and compassion activates this brain region and increases the ability to savor positive emotions.

What Matters More? Size or Quality of Your Social Network

What's more important for your health, happiness, and well-being—the quantity or quality of your social network?

Can Oxytocin Fortify Resilience Against Childhood Adversity?

A new study from Emory University reports that manipulating the oxytocin system has the potential to fortify a person's resilience against childhood adversity, abuse, or neglect.

Childhood Poverty Has Detrimental Impacts on Brain Structure

Evidence continues to mount that there is a link between growing up in a low-income household, brain development, and lower academic achievement. The majority of children attending public schools in the United States come from low-income households. We have a crisis on our hands. In this blog post, I summarize the findings of a wide range of recent studies on this topic.

How Does Physical Fitness Improve Your Brain Function?

New research has identified specific benefits of physical fitness on brain structure and function.

The Double-Edged Sword of Self-Control

For some people, self-control may act as a “double-edged sword" that leads to external success but speeds up the aging process at an epigenetic level.

Everyday Access to Nature Promotes Well-Being As We Age

A new study reports that spending time in natural environments promotes healthy aging and overall well-being.

Cortisol and Oxytocin Hardwire Fear-Based Memories

New research shows that the "stress hormone" cortisol and the "love hormone" oxytocin can create a double whammy when it comes to hardwiring anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Why Do Women Live Longer Than Men?

Women live longer than men because of modern lifestyle factors, rather than any biological difference, a new study reports.

5 Ways to Protect Yourself from a Leading Cause of Death

These five lifestyle choices can reduce your risk of dying from a leading cause of death by 50 percent.

Some Medications May Alter Childhood Brain Development

Medications that disrupt REM sleep may alter brain structure during critical phases of child development.

The Neuroscience of Recalling Old Memories

Neuroscientists have identified how our brain encodes multiple aspects of a life event into a singular memory for later recollection.

The Neuroscience of Forming New Memories

In a breakthrough study, an international team of neuroscientists has identify how new memories are formed by individual neurons.

How Does Your Circadian Clock Keep Track of the Seasons?

Until now, the specific neurobiology of how our circadian clocks keep track of the seasons has been a mystery. Recently, researchers identified how circadian rhythms synchronize with the seasons. These findings could lead to new treatments for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and insomnia.

How Does Scent Drive Human Behavior?

Researchers have identified how specific scents can motivate your decision making.

Physically Active Children Grow Up to Be Healthier Adults

Why are children who exercise regularly more likely to remain healthy and fit into adulthood?

Why Do Teens Assume Vaping or Smoking Marijuana Is Harmless?

A new study from Stanford University Medical Center reports that adolescents commonly assume that "vaping" e-cigarettes or smoking marijuana is harmless. Why do so many teenagers underestimate the risks of e-cigarettes and smoking cannabis?

Sitting All Day Increases Your Risk of Anxiety

A new study reports that excessive sitting can increase your risk of anxiety.

How Do Various Cortisol Levels Impact Cognitive Functioning?

Having just the right amount of cortisol in your bloodstream appears to optimize childhood cognitive functioning. What is the secret to finding the sweet spot between too much cortisol or too little cortisol?

Increasing Physical Movement Reduces Symptoms of ADHD

New research shows that physical movement may improve cognitive control for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Do You Have a Family Snapshot and Memory of the Twin Towers?

Do you have a snapshot and memory of the original World Trade Center or Twin Towers prior to September 11, 2001? "My WTC" is creating a blog archive of personal photographs of the former World Trade Center in an effort to preserve the meaning and significance of the WTC from the intimate vantage point of New Yorkers, visitors, and tourists from all over the world.

3 Ways Pessimism About Future Possibilities Fuels Depression

A new study reports that having a pessimistic attitude about "possible futures" isn't simply the result of depression. Pessimism about possible futures may be a leading cause of depression.

Hippocrates Was Right: "Walking Is the Best Medicine"

If you hate to exercise, I have good news. You don't necessarily have to exert yourself to reap huge benefits from physical activity. Researchers have found that small doses of light-intensity exercise—such as an easy walk or taking the stairs—are extremely good for your health.

Why Do Certain Blood Types Have a Higher Risk of Dementia?

Neuroscientists have discovered that your blood type may impact brain volume in regions linked to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

What Are the Eleven Symptoms of "Alcohol Use Disorder"?

New research has found that alcohol use disorder (AUD) is an often untreated epidemic in the United States. Do you have an alcohol use disorder? This blog post highlights the 11 symptoms of AUD currently being used to assess both alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.

The Cerebellum May Be the Seat of Creativity

In a revolutionary discovery, new research from Stanford University published on May 28, 2015 reports that the cerebellum may be the seat of creativity.

"Surf Therapy" and Being in the Ocean Can Alleviate PTSD

Recently I spoke with filmmaker Josh Izenberg about his new documentary "Resurface." The short film is about military veterans who learn to surf as a way to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and transform their lives.

Pages