Cerebellum Stimulation Influences Frontal Cortex Functioning

Stimulating the cerebellum normalizes frontal cortex activity in lab rats with abnormal dopamine processing, a new study reports. These findings could have many human applications.

Real-World Neuroscience Research Promotes Human Interactions

Pioneering neuroscientists are taking their research out of the lab and into the real-world. Recent "Out of the Lab" studies illuminate the importance of face-to-face eye contact.

Disney Research Pioneers New Frontiers Using Virtual Reality

Walt Disney researchers are fine-tuning virtual reality (VR) technologies that could be used to improve athletic performance and many other "proprioception-based" daily activities.

Stanford Scientists Discover Surprising Cerebellum Functions

A pioneering Stanford University study has discovered a previously unknown cognitive role of specific neurons in the historically overlooked cerebellum (Latin for "little brain").

Intellectual Humility Augments Nonpartisan Open-Mindedness

Regardless of your party or religious beliefs, new research from Duke shows that intellectual humility may be the key to breaking down barriers that divide us.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

More Proof That Skin-to-Skin Contact Benefits Babies' Brains

Growing evidence suggests that skin-to-skin contact plays a significant role in healthy childhood brain development for all newborns, but especially for babies born prematurely.

Harvard Study Finds Genetic ‘Toggle Switch’ for Sociability

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have pinpointed specific neuronal circuitry and a 'toggle switch' that can turn a mouse's sociability "on" and "off" in the laboratory.

Long-Term Use of ADHD Medications May Suppress Adult Height

Extended long-term use of medications to treat ADHD is associated with suppression of adult height by age 25, according to a new longitudinal study.

Poetry Lights Up Your Brain Like a Favorite Song, fMRI Shows

New research on the link between happy or scary musical cues—and the difference between reading poetry or prose—offer new clues about how the brain responds to music and poetry.

Genetics Play a Role in Social Anxiety Disorder, Study Finds

A new study has pinpointed a genetic link between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and a serotonin transporter gene called "SLC6A4."

Physical Activity May Be a Drug-Free Elixir for Chronic Pain

Lower levels of sedentary behavior and higher levels of physical activity may be critical for maintaining effective endogenous pain inhibitory function, according to a new study.

Mayo Clinic Study Identifies How Exercise Staves Off Old Age

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have discovered that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a fountain of youth for people of all ages.

Social Media Exacerbates Perceived Social Isolation

A new study reports that heavy use of social media is associated with increased social isolation.

Yoga Helps Reduce Symptoms of Depression, Study Finds

Practicing yoga and yogic breathing a few times a week can reduce symptoms of major depressive disorder, according to new research.

Study Finds Mechanism That Controls Brain's Information Flow

Neuroscientists have identified specialized nerve cells that act like a "switchboard" to control information flow in the cerebral cortex.

The Cerebellum May Play Unforeseen Role in Driving Addiction

For the first time, a new comprehensive review puts the cerebellum in the spotlight as a central player behind the neurobiology that drives drug addiction.

Regular Aerobic Exercise in Midlife Protects the Aging Brain

Regular aerobic exercise benefits the brain in surprising ways. New research suggests that regular aerobic exercise in midlife can optimize blood flow networks as the brain ages.

Highly Creative People Have Well-Connected Brain Hemispheres

People who are highly creative have better connectivity between the left and right brain hemispheres, according to a new study by a team of international researchers.

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Joseph LeDoux Reports: Emotions Are “Higher-Order States”

Legendary neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux (who put the amygdala in the spotlight) has an exciting new hypothesis about how the brain processes emotions.

Low-Intensity Aerobic Exercise Has Surprising Brain Benefits

There is growing evidence that low-intensity physical activity has multiple brain benefits. A new study reports that easy aerobic exercise boosts visual sensitivity and perception.

The Neuroscience of Deciding: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Neuroscientists recently pinpointed how subareas within the prefrontal cortex drive behavior. These findings could lead to new treatments for impulse control disorders such as OCD.

Study: Immigration Is Not Linked to Increased Crime Rates

After analyzing four decades of immigration-crime statistics in the U.S., a team of researchers concluded that there is no correlation between immigration and increased crime.

Motor Skills, Movement, and Math Performance Are Intertwined

There is growing evidence that children who are physically active do better in school. A new study found that kids who move their bodies while learning math get higher test scores.

Subconscious Fear Exposure Helps Reduce Phobias, Study Finds

A new study reports that a technique called "backward masking" can help arachnophobes reduce their fear of spiders simply by subconsciously viewing images of spiders.

How Do Neuroplasticity and Neurogenesis Rewire Your Brain?

A groundbreaking new study has identified how the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) combined with neuroplasticity can rewire the brain and reshape the mind.

Letting Go of Unattainable Goals Has Psychological Perks

A new game-changing study identifies an unexpected silver lining of depression: People with depression can let go of unattainable goals more quickly, which has psychological perks.

Are Your Circadian Rhythms Out of Whack? Try Pitching a Tent

Spending the weekend on a camping trip with minimal artificial light exposure and an abundance of natural light can reset your internal circadian clock, according to a new study.

Arousing Curiosity May Help Take the Politics Out of Science

A new Yale-led study has pinpointed a simple antidote that may help us take the politics out of science.

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