High School Popularity Might Backfire Later in Life

High school popularity may be overrated, according to a new 10-year study.

Top 10 Concerns Parents Have for Their Own Kids (and Others)

Bullying/cyberbullying, internet safety, racial inequities, and school violence top parents' list of concerns for their children's well-being, according to a new 2017 report.

Does Gut Microbiome Influence Mindset and Mental Toughness?

Harvard scientists have pinpointed specific gut microbiome linked to peak athletic performance. Someday soon, these findings could be used to benefit people from all walks of life.

Is Accepting Unpleasant Emotions the Secret to Happiness?

Are you feeling outraged or sad right now? New research reports that accepting negative emotions as part of the ups and downs of life will make you happier in the long run.

Will Trump's Twitter Feed Have Unexpected Boomerang Effects?

Will President Trump's latest Tweets directed at American CEOs result in unexpected outcomes? The theory of psychological reactance helps to explain some of the dynamics at play.

Bumper Stickers Can Facilitate Dynamic Social Interactions

The tragic events in Charlottesville have left many of us speechless. The only cogent response I have for my 9-year-old daughter is from a "Hate Has No Home Here" bumper sticker.

The Cerebellum May Be Part of Brain's "Reality-Check" System

Researchers at Yale University have identified a link between the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") and someone's susceptibility to Pavlovian conditioned hallucinations.

Debunking Neuromyths: Eight Common Brain Myths Set Straight

A new study puts brain myths in the spotlight. True or false: "Some people are left-brained, and some of us are right-brained." Many believe this myth is true. It's not.

Is Connectivity Neurofeedback Training the Next Big Thing?

Neuroscientists have developed a technique called "functional connectivity neurofeedback training" that can alter cognitive function and performance. This could be revolutionary.

Imperfection Makes Celebrities (and All of Us) More Likable

The attractiveness of imperfection is called the Pratfall Effect. Buddhists realized that imperfection is a beautiful thing eons ago. Justin Bieber recently had the same epiphany.

Sizeism Is Harming Too Many of Us: Fat Shaming Must Stop

Much needed efforts are being made to reduce sizeism, weight bias, and medical fat shaming by health care providers.

Workplace Wellness Programs Create the Ultimate Win-Win

A new study reports that corporate wellness programs improve employees' overall well-being and lead to higher motivation, workplace productivity, and lower health care costs.

Green Tea May Ameliorate Brain Drain Linked to Western Diets

A pioneering new study reports that a compound in green tea (EGCG) may prove to be a therapeutic intervention for diet-related memory impairment and neuroinflammation.

Silent Third Person Self-Talk Facilitates Emotion Regulation

Silently talking to yourself in the third person—and using your own name during inner dialogues—facilitates emotion regulation, according to a recent neuroscience-based study.

The New Science of Using Eye Movements as a Test for Autism

Neuroscientists have identified a radical new way to test for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) by monitoring rapid eye movements.

Cortisol: Harvard Study Finds "Moderate-response" May Be Key

Contrary to popular belief, a new study reports that "too much" or "too little" cortisol both indicate a maladaptive response to stressful experiences.

One More Reason Aerobic Exercise Is So Good for Your Brain

Researchers have pinpointed a molecular mechanism that might explain why physical activity improves cognitive function, boosts brain power, and reduces dementia.

Stanford Researchers Identify Life-changing Power of Mindset

Mindset plays a surprisingly significant role in our health and longevity, according to a new study from Stanford University.

Arts-Based Activities Boost Emotion Regulation, Study Finds

We all know from life experience that creative expression makes us feel good. Now, a new study reaffirms that arts-based activities boost positive emotions and reduce negativity.

Infant Gut Microbiome May Influence Cognitive Development

In the past month, two pioneering human studies have revealed fresh clues on how various colonies of gut microbiome influence brain function and cognitive development.

Will Social Prescribing Be the Next Wellness Phenomenon?

"Social prescribing" is a relatively new non-medical approach to psychological, physical, and financial well-being that has the potential to dramatically improve people's lives.

Small Acts of Generous Behavior Can Make Your Brain Happier

New research shows that very small amounts of generosity can affect you on a neurobiological level.

New Study Links PTSD with More Gray Matter in Right Amygdala

Last year, scientists found that specific regions within the amygdala process positive or negative emotions. Now, a new study finds that PTSD is linked to a larger right amygdala.

Anxiety Is Now Public Enemy No. 1

Anxiety has become a nationwide epidemic that is creating a public health crisis. The good news is that there are drug-free ways to lower your anxiety by engaging your vagus nerve.

At Wimbledon, Grunts May Separate Winners from Losers

Two new studies reaffirm that speaking (or grunting) in a lower pitch voice can make you appear less submissive in daily life and help you perform better in sporting competitions.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Helps Treatment-Resistant Depression

A 5-year study reports that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) significantly improved treatment-resistant depression outcomes when compared to the treatment-as-usual arm of the study.

New Research Explains Why Some of Us Really Hate to Exercise

A new study suggests that shifting rigid mindsets and stereotypes about what it means to be "athletic" may be the secret to making moderate-intensity exercise actually feel good.

Gut Microbiota May Influence Mood and Behavior, Study Finds

A pioneering new study identifies a correlation between various types of gut bacteria, differences in brain structure, and someone's response to negative emotional stimuli.

Hunter-gatherer Ancestry May Be Why Our Brains Need Exercise

A radical new evolutionary neuroscience theory may explain how our hunter-gatherer ancestors inadvertently hardwired our modern day brains to thrive on everyday physical activity.

Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid?

A new study reports that the mere sight of one's own smartphone—even if the phone is turned off and face down—can create "brain drain" by depleting finite cognitive resources.

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