Sesame Street and Autism: The PG-Rated "Extras"

Young children accept any playmate who is not hostile. It is the parents who usually communicate discomfort, caution or pity, and it is the parents who have the most to learn.

When Is Reimagining the Past a Sign of Emotional Health?

For counterfactual thinking to be functionally beneficial, we need a coherent story of cause and effect that makes us an essential actor in the story.

Why Does Autism Still Exist?

Some gene variants associated with autism are also significantly associated with high intelligence. “Smart” genes are advantageous from an evolutionary standpoint, so they persist.

Finding the "Why" of a Special-Needs Child's Behavior

Behavior is a form of communication, and more often than not, especially in young children, it is not communicating a desire to be non-compliant or troublesome.

"Refrigerator Mothering" Is Dead but the Blame Game Lives On

The mother—and now the father too—are still suspect. Suspected of what? Nobody knows for sure, but whatever it is, we are expected to defend ourselves against it.

Autism, ADHD, and Executive Functioning: Parenting Insights

We have tried visual strategies; we have tried planning discussions; we have tried scripts' we have tried first/then; we have tried IEP goals; and we have tried threats.

Incubating a Political Conscience

Figuring out when asserting yourself reflects courage and when it reflects imprudence takes, for many of us, a lifetime.

Abraham Lincoln Tops List of Famous Jewish Swimmers!

"Famous people with autism" lists are not created primarily to motivate our children. They exist to motivate us adults to adjust our own beliefs about autism.

Learning to Tell a Lie

Lying through your teeth requires more social awareness than most of us appreciate.

Autism and Creativity

Autism is associated with rigid thinking, restricted interests, and a literal interpretation of speech and behavior. How could a person with these traits possibly be creative?

A Wish to Be an Aspie

If your child needs the space to get up and walk around the classroom, what difference does it make if that need arises from AD/HD or ASD?

Special-Needs Parenting and the Lowerarchy: Part Two

The lowerarchy is more than a boundary; it is an edifice of alternating comfort and despair, always at the expense of other people and their children.

The Lowerarchy of Special-Needs Parenting

Instead of using the rhetoric of “better than,” we shift to “not as bad-off as,” as in “my kid is not as bad-off as yours. "We’ve created a lowerarchy.

"Mom, Am I Disabled?"

Identifying a person as disabled entails locking that person into a world of very limited expectations. Having a disability describes all of us.

When May We Change the Topic From the Election?

We will want the predictability of our routines. Even the meltdowns will reassure us that our own small corner of the world is recognizable—and still needs tending.

"No Thanks" to This Line of Autism Research

My family’s DNA is a coveted commodity. Our older daughter is autistic, and researchers want our blood and saliva. Once upon a time I would have happily donated. Not now.