This seems to be one of those. It goes on and on and on. Mainers usually don’t complain about the weather, but this year is an exception. I was glad to hear their complaints because I thought it might just be me. But, no, everyone is complaining about the winter, and that’s okay. At one point I heard on the evening news that 49 of the 50 states had snow on the ground somewhere in each state.  Florida was the exception.

So I thought it would be worth doing another post on a winter that seems endless. (If you recall, I did one in late fall.) So first of all, remember the winter is not endless: This too will pass. Spring will come. And even though the cold of winter encourages us to hibernate and isolate, don’t. Keep connected with your friends. Use the phone and use social media if you cannot venture out on the ice and snow. 

Stay active. If you can’t walk or run because of the ice, find a gym or a mall and do some laps. 

Keep a sense of humor. There are all sorts of jokes about this winter I can’t remember right now. 

Help other people. Shovel your neighbor’s walk or help him or her dig out their car. Both of you will feel good about that. 

And keep your flexibility. Bad weather demands it. We may not be on time for every appointment or you may have to cancel things that you’ve been planning for a long time. 

Be patient. Remember, this is temporary, not permanent, and it doesn’t have to affect every aspect of your life. Accept that this is something you cannot control, but complaining about it is okay. Mother Nature is breaking records across the country this year. Record snowfalls, lowest temperatures, etc., etc. There’s no one to blame, so please don’t blame the weatherman.

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