Finally, a new book I can recommend to patients without hesitation: Restoring our Bodies, Reclaiming our Lives: Guidance and Reflections on Recovery from Eating Disorders by Aimee Liu, Trumpeter Press, 2011. This book is focuses on the real possibility of full recovery from eating disorders--a belief that both the author and I share. Most eating disorder memoirs are 95% horrific stories of how eating disorders ruin lives. Such books can be very triggering to patients in the throes of an eating disorder with talk about calories, weight, and graphic descriptions of eating disordered behaviors. These books usually devote only the last few pages to the recovery process.Aimee's book is the opposite. She incorporates stories (a letter from one of my patient's is included) from contributors who tell about the varied ways in which they recovered. Interspersed between these moving  and instructive recovery stories are descriptions of the most effective new treatments and information on the dangers of eating disorders.Aimee ends Reclaiming our Lives contrasting the difference between being "in recovery" versus "fully recovered." My patients are finding that this book gives them true hope that energizes their efforts to be one of the "fully recovered."

Marcia

Nutritionist Marcia Herrin and Nancy Matsumoto, co-authors of The Parent's Guide to Eating Disorders, Gūrze Books, (www.childhoodeatingdisorders.com). Marcia is also author of Nutrition Counseling in the Treatment of Eating Disorders (www.marciaherrin.com).

Copyrighted by Marcia Herrin and Nancy Matsumoto

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