Blame It on Rio Part 2

Ryan Lochte’s false reporting about a minor incident in Rio has put a blemish on the otherwise awesome 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. Should he be forgiven?

Blame It on Rio Part 1

The US swimming debacle in Rio, spearheaded by all-star Ryan Lochte, is a timeless story of Young Male Syndrome.

Donald Trump as High in the Dark Triad

The dark triad has emerged as a powerful framework for understanding people. Here’s an application of this concept to presidential candidate, Donald Trump.

Kids’ Sports as a Window Into Human Nature

The dark side of kids’ sports is as dark as human nature gets. Evolutionary psychology can explain why.

From 5K to Marathon

Want to run a marathon one day? I bet you can. Here’s how.

Evolved as One People

Right before our eyes, the world has seemed to all but unravel. Perhaps an evolutionary perspective can help us remember that we’re all in the same boat.

Paleo Reality

The Paleo movement may be controversial, but at its core, it’s dead-on. Here’s why.

History of the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society

This post combines my interest in evolutionary psychology along with my interest in doing my best to inspire young minds to achieve. Here is the story of NEEPS.

That’s Not Really True About Evolutionary Psychology

There are plenty of science-based criticisms of evolutionary psychology. And they are often misguided. Here’s why.

Multi-Factorial Causation and the Orlando Shootings

People across the world are arguing as to the “true” cause of the Orlando killings. Without question, in fact, there were multiple causes. Here’s why.

The Altruist of Newark Airport

In humans, conspicuous helping of strangers signals a ton about oneself to others. Take the case of Billy from Newark ...

Evolutionary Psychology Goes Just Fine with Religion

There is no need for religion and evolutionary psychology to be in conflict. Here's why.

September 11th, Evolution, and the Face of Hell

September 11, 2001 showed us the darkest side of our nature. The evolutionary perspective can help us understand why.

The Evolutionary Psychology of Humility

Stewardship is broadly valued in others - just as selfishness is broadly repulsed. Here’s why.

Mothers Are Altruists Sine Qua Non

Mothering is, by far and away, the most common form of prosocial behavior in our species. Here’s why.

Black Studies in Modern Academia

The academic field of Black Studies, interdisciplinary in scope and multi-faceted in purpose, is critical for best educating the next generation of leaders. Here’s a success story.

I’m Not “That Kind” of Psychologist

The term “psychologist” may be one of the most-often confused names of any profession. Here’s why. Along with some suggested alternatives.

#Anythingcanhappen

A core tenet that underlies evolutionary science is the fact that an inordinate number possibilities exist when it comes to just about anything. This fact can be an inspiration.

Sometimes Evolutionary Mismatch is a Good Thing

Often, modern environments mismatch ancestral environments to our detriment. But sometimes, unnatural technologies can be beneficial. Here’s an example - that relates to autism.

5 Keys to Living a Richer Life

Transcending the self sits at the core of a Darwinian take on life. From this perspective, it’s not about the money.

Financial Privilege and the Publication of Science

With a steep increase in “open-access” scholarly publishing, comes a non-egalitarian trend - only scholars from wealthy institutions can "afford" to publish in the best journals.

The Selfless Gene

People who think that Dawkins’ “selfish gene” phrase implies that all human behavior evolved to be selfish have it completely wrong. Here’s the deal.

The Case of the Non-Stuffy Academic

Every now and again, a thinker comes along who radically changes how we understand the entirety of life. Robert Trivers is a living example.

Why Trump’s “Private Parts” Comments Were Seen as Wrong

Trump’s comments about his own private parts during a GOP debate were disgusting to many. The evolutionary psychology of language helps us understand why.

Apples, the Bible, and Paleo

When the Bible was written about 3,000 years ago, an apple was as scrumptious as food could get. If the Bible were written today, perhaps the cupcake would be temptation's icon.

What Can Dung Beetles Teach Us About War?

Years of looking for beetles on the underside of elephant dung in Africa led biologist Doug Emlen to keen insights into human warfare. Here’s how.

What Are We Here For?

Only once we know the function of something, such as human behavior, can we actually understand it.

Why Should Professors Excel in Both Teaching and Research?

University professors are required to excel at both teaching and research - in spite of the fact that these are actually unrelated endeavors.

Instagram and the Development of Social Skills

While Instagram and other social-media products often lead to social problems for today’s young people, they also have the capacity to cultivate social skills. Here’s how.

No, There Is No Extra Credit!

Nearly every teacher has heard this gut-wrenching question: “Is there extra credit?” For me, the answer has always been "no!" And here’s why.

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