Despite the fact that millions of dogs each year are "put to sleep" because no one wants them, many people still choose to buy purebreds from breeders themselves or from pet stores. I just learned of a brilliant program in Costa Rica that is well worth sharing widely because it can serve as a model for other shelters around the world. 

"But what can be of more value that because of its mix is like no other?"

In a video called "One Country's Plan To Save Unwanted Dogs Is Pure Genius" you'll learn about how a shelter in Costa Rica called Territorio De Zaguates is dealing with numerous abandoned dogs who dearly want and need homes. You meet such unique breeds as the fire-tailed border collie, the marbled English filamaraner, and the shaggy shepherd dachspaniel. A quote from this short and inspirational video that really caught my eye goes as follows: "But what can be of more value that because of its mix is like no other?" Amen.

Please watch and share this video and work to make a huge difference in the lives of dogs who will otherwise be put down because no one wants a mixed breed mutt. However, these wonderful beings also can be viewed as new and unique breeds for those who want both a purebred and a dog. 

The teaser collage can be seen here

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