Anthrozoology, also called human-animal studies (HAS), is a rapidly growing and expanding interdisciplinary field. A recent and comprehensive review of this wide-ranging discipline can be found in Paul Waldau's book titled Animal Studies: An Introduction. Many of the essays I write for Psychology Today have something to do with anthrozoology in that they focus on the wide variety of relationships that humans establish with nonhuman animals (animals). Some essays also discuss what we can learn from other animals, including traits such as trust, friendship, forgiveness, love, and hope

Often, a simple video captures the essence of the deep nature of the incredibly close and enduring bonds we form with other animals and they with us. As a case in point, my recent essay called "A Dog and His Man" showed a dog exuberantly expressing his deep feelings for a human companion he hadn't seen for six months. Another essay titled "My Dog Always Eats First: Homeless People and Their Animals" dealt with the relationship between homeless people and the animals with whom they share their lives.

Daisy: An unforgettable and inspirational symbol of dedication and hope

I just saw another video called "Daisy - the Little Pup Who Believed" that is well-worth sharing widely with others of all ages. There is no way I can summarize the depth of five-month old Daisy's resolve to walk again after she was injured or of the devotion of the woman, Jolene, who found her on the side of a road - scared, malnourished, unable to walk or wag her tail, the people who contributed money to help her along, or the wonderful veterinarians and staff at Barrie Veterinary Hospital in Ontario, Canada, who took care of her. You can also read about Daisy's remarkable and inspirational journey here.

Please take five minutes out of your day to watch this video, read the text, listen to the song that accompanies it, and share it widely. I am sure you will get teary as you watch Daisy go from an injured little ball of fur living in a ditch on the side of a road with a broken spine to learning to walk in water to romping around wildly as if life had been that proverbial pail of cherries from the start. 

I've watched Daisy's journey many times and every single time my eyes get watery. Among the many lessons in this wonderful video is "stay strong and never give up". Clearly dogs and many other animals can truly teach us about traits such as trust, friendship, forgiveness, love, and hope.

The teaser image can be seen here.

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