"These animals ... you gotta take care of them ... and not eat them"

Children often ask difficult questions that we wish would go away, and this inspirational video of a young boy named Luiz Antonio, asking his mother why we eat octopus, raises many challenging questions about the nonhuman animals (animals) we choose to routinely and mindlessly consume. His sensitivity and compassion are contagious and should force us to reflect on our meal plans.  Among the gems Luiz speaks are:  "I don't like that they die" and "These animals ... you gotta take care of them ... and not eat them." He also wonders why a man chopped up an octopus so that he and his mother can eat it. Luiz's mother warmly engages her son and in the end gently asks him to eat his potatoes and rice. Her sensitivity and tears also are wonderfully inspirational. 

Watching and thinking deeply about this brief two and a half minute video is well worth your time. I can easily see it being used in classrooms, cocktail parties, and other venues for discussions of our complicated and challenging relationships with other animals and the choices we make that cause unnecessary pain, suffering, and death.

Leave it to kids to innocently take us out of our comfort zones. Thank you Luiz and mom. 

The teaser image can be seen here.

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