Animals are "in". People all over the world love watching nonhuman animals (animals) do their thing and to read about their fascinating lives. Often the best way to learn about the other animals with whom we share our planet, including our homes, is to read personal stories about these amazing beings. 

I want to call attention to a wonderful book, edited by teenager Christine Catlin, called The Animal Anthology Project. In this newly published collection of 65 short essays, numerous authors, including myself and other scientists and popular writers, offer stories about a diverse array of animals including cats, dogs, chimpanzees, birds, horses, elephants, hedgehogs, fish, bees, cockroaches, and tarantulas. Topics covered include their amazing intellectual capacities, their emotional lives including feelings and expressions of joy, grief, compassion, empathy, and love, and motherhood. And not only will you learn about some general aspects of the behavior of a given species, you'll also meet some awesome individuals. 

I learned a lot about many animals with whom I was unfamiliar and I'm sure you will as well. Each story is an easy read and you can pick up the book whenever you have time and enjoy learning about some fascinating and inspiring animals with whom you have not had, or likely will not have, up close and personal contact. 

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