Studying the ways in which nonhuman animals sense their world is a most awe-inspiring area of research. Not surprinsgly, there are vast differences in the sensory capacities among animals that are highly correlated to the ways in which they live. Bats and dolphins produce ultrasounds, elephants and whales emit low-frequency infrasounds that travel great distances, and dogs, rodents, and elephants, for example, have highly evolved senses of smell, although they elect to put their noses in places that we, with our reduced olfactory capacities, still find offensive.

As highly visual animals we often think of other animals as sharing our visual acuity, and in some instances this is a valid assumption. However, there are vast differences among species—some see better than others—and this beautifully illustrated and highly informative infographic nicely lays out how dogs, cats, horses, zebras, birds, and insects, among  other animals, see the world. 

I can't wait to share it with many others, including kids who are always curious about the lives of other animals. And this information is not only very useful for our learning about who other animals are, but also for how we can enrich their lives when they are compromised in a human-dominated world. 

The teaser image can be found here

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