Just about every day is a mixed bag for nonhuman animals. For example, last week we learned about the horrific torture of wolves and this morning I learned about new discoveries concerning the social behavior and social complexity of bottlesnose dolphins who form groups that then coalesce to cooperate with one another but not to control territory or for reproductive reasons (the abstract for the original research paper is here).

The next email I opened this morning was not as celebratory as it concerned competitve raccoon hunting using dogs to raise money for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Of course I and everyone I know fully support the remarkable work of St. Jude, but there is no reason at all for them to assoicate with a horrific blood-sport that not only will result in the merciless killing of numerous raccoons but also in leaving many orphaned babies to die. Furthermore, coon-hunting dogs are often trained using live bait and a dog was killed during their 2010 event. 

We continue to have very complex and contradictory relationships with other animal beings and it's important to celebrate their remarkable lives and also to call for an immediate stop to our causing wanton, heinous, and intentional harm. You can sign a petition to ask St. Jude to stop raising blood money here. Thank you for doing so.

Recent Posts in Animal Emotions

Captive Killer Whales Die Much Younger than Wild Orcas

A new study shows captive killer whales don't live as long as wild relatives

Dogs and Underdogs: Happiness at Both Ends of the Leash

Elizabeth Abbott's book and Toni Shelbourne's "Among the Wolves" are great reads

Kids and Animals Helping One Another at Green Chimneys

A conference on human-animal interaction shows how much can be done for all

Judge Recognizes Two Chimpanzees as Legal Persons: A First

Two chimpanzees, Hercules and Leo, are determined to be persons in NY court

Dogs, Humans, and the Oxytocin-Mediated Strong Social Bond

Mutual gazing by dogs but not wolves increases oxytocin levels in humans.

Why Writing for Psychology Today Is a Good Idea

Writing for popular audiences is more effective than publishing in journals.