A little more than 3 months ago I wrote about how government sanctioned workers wantonly and ruthlessly kill millions of animals in the name of management or control. Not only is the mass slaughter unnecessary, but the horrific methods that are used are non-specific - "non-target" animals are also killed. Recently a dog named Bella was killed by an M-44-sodium cyanide device placed on the private property of a family in Texas. (For more information on M-44s and why they should be banned click here.) What's interesting, but not at all unusual about the careless placement of the explosive device, is that there were also children who could have been maimed or killed. A gray fox also was killed in this ridiculous, egregious, and expensive war on wildlife. Furthermore, a official with Wildlife Services has had the audacity to suggest that people might take their pets out to be poisoned so they can sue the government

Wildlife Services blatantly ignored directives about the placement of M-44s in this case, which is not at all unique, and the people on whose property they were placed also were not informed. Please contact your representatives and urge them to cut funding for Wildlife Services and lethal predator control. Clearly, Wildlife Services continues on its merry way because they can. Cruelty can't stand the spotlight so let's do something to stop their killing ways. 

Recent Posts in Animal Emotions

Dogs, Humans, and the Oxytocin-Mediated Strong Social Bond

Mutual gazing by dogs but not wolves increases oxytocin levels in humans.

Why Writing for Psychology Today Is a Good Idea

Writing for popular audiences is more effective than publishing in journals.

Wildlife Services Slaughtered 2.7 Million Animals in 2014

This federal agency AKA Murder Inc. wages horrific war on all types of wildlife.

Worms Sniff Out Cancer in Urine Better than Blood Tests

Roundworms correctly identify cancer samples 95.8% of the time

The Modern Savage: A New Book Questions Why We Eat Animals

James McWilliams' new book is a very thoughtful book about our meal plans

The Emotional Lives of Rats: Rats Read Pain in Others' Faces

A new study shows that rats see the pain that other rats are suffering.