When a sick or injured animal is taken into captivity so that we might help them rehabilitate to full health so that they can eventually be released back into the wild, do the humans who have taken on the role of ‘looking after’ that individual then ‘own’ them and who gets to decide on that individual’s future?

This is a dilemma that has been brought into sharp focus by the case of an orca (killer whale) who was brought into captivity following rescue at sea with the aim of rehabilitating her and then releasing her back into the wild. While in captivity she has been given the human name ‘Morgan’. However, rather than being rehabilitated back into the wild to return to her home waters, she currently languishes in a tank in the Harderwijk dolphinarium in the Netherlands.

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS) rightly states that nobody ‘owns’ any whale or dolphin. This principle is enshrined in the Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans: Whales and Dolphins which states, among other things that:

‘No cetacean should be held in captivity or servitude; be subject to cruel treatment; or be removed from their natural environment’;

All cetaceans have the right to freedom of movement and residence within their natural environment; and

No cetacean is the property of any State, corporation, human group or individual.

 In undertaking any apparent ‘act of good will’, in order to help a wild animal, we must be very careful that we make choices that are truly independent of vested human interest, or the potential vested interests of a corporation that could then exploit this situation for their own profits. While the initial intent to help may be earnest, the question of who decides on the individual’s future in such cases must surely reside with an appointed guardian who has no vested interest in keeping the individual in captivity. Such a guardian would not ‘own’ the individual, but give a truly independent voice for the individual animal’s interests.

It's hard to conceive of a similar situation where a human patient who had been taken into a hospital for treatment is then, once recovered, kept in the hospital as a ‘show piece’ or 'poster child' to help the hospital increase its funds. Orcas are live in complex social groups and are highly sentient individuals (see also and) and we have a duty to protect their interests in such situations, just as we would other individuals who cannot speak for themselves.  

Please send an e-protest letter today to the Dutch Government, asking them to support the proposal to release Morgan, and please sign this petition

For more information about orcas and the reality of their life in captivity check out Orca Watch.

This post was written with Philippa Brakes a Senior Biologist
WDCS with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society.

Photo credit

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