I just just learned that the market price for coyote fur is rising steeply. To see the report, if you can take it, click here. I was also told that president of the Nova Scotia fur trappers association was bragging that all the recent media about coyotes is driving prices way up, and that trappers are teaching wilderness coyotes to salivate for tuna sandwiches and to come when called. Sensationalist media that misrepresents coyotes and other animals does indeed put these animals in danger. A recent TV documentary dealing with a serious tragedy - the first known human death due to a coyote attack in North America - was filled with melodrama and hype and the conclusions drawn about why the coyotes attacked the young woman (to kill and eat her) remain highly tentative. Media counts and must do a better job. 

For more information on fur sales in the western United States see. I apologize, the pictures are horrific. 

For a detailed account of coyote attacks on humans in the United States and Canada please see

Possible contacts for National Geographic:  pressroom@ngs.orgestanley@ngs.org


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