The New Science of Animal Psychiatry

Nicolas Dodman takes us into a world of dogs with autism and Tourette’s syndrome, horses with OCD, and cats who attack their owners for no apparent reason.

The Rainbow Link

A new book helps young children process the death of a pet and learn to grieve in healthy ways.

Models of the Human-Dog Relationship

Which model of the human-dog relationship is most scientifically accurate and morally appropriate?

Which Mammals Are Most Suitable as Pets?

A team of researchers in the Netherlands suggests which mammals make suitable pets and which don’t.

What’s (Legally) Inside of a Dog?

New legal rulings are clarifying that animals are not the same as inanimate property such as a suitcase and that owners have strong obligations of proper care.

Pets Are Not Trash

We often hear that pets are being treated better than ever. Why, then, do so many animals end up being treated like garbage?

Giving Back

There is a direct correlation between the amount of quality time you spend with your dog and your dog's behavior and happiness.

What's Behind That Door? Just Life.

Neil Abramson’s new book will appeal to those who understand the bond of love between human and dog—and what happens when someone threatens that bond.

Should It Be Legal to Kill Your Own Pet?

A South Carolina county wants to make it illegal to kill your own dog.

More Overstated Claims About Pets and Our Health

A recent study claims that pet ownership offers an $11.7 billion savings to our healthcare system. But there is a bit more to it.

Trading Places

What happens when a hospice veterniarian spends the day with a human hospice physician?

25 Signs of Pain in Cats

When are deviations from normal behavior a sign that your cat is pain? A paper published this week presents the consensus of an international panel of experts.

Cloning Pets

You love your dog or cat. Someday your dog or cat will die. What if you could put aside the genetic materials to make a perfect copy of your beloved animal, a clone of your pet?

Is Your Dog in Pain?

A new book helps dog owners understand and address pain.

The Fourth Care Commitment

Presumably, death has meaning to animals themselves. The death of an animal can also be profoundly meaningful to their human companions.

The Third Care Commitment

If you are the caregiver for an ill animal, watch for signs of burnout. Remember that caring for an animal means also caring for yourself.

The Second Care Commitment

End-of-life care should seek to protect the integrity of an animal patient, and should allow the animal to live in ways that honor what she finds most meaningful.

The First Care Commitment

One of the most important things we can do for our elderly or ill animals is attend to "total pain," and respond creatively and compassionately to the full range of suffering.

4 Care Commitments

Four core ethical commitments can shape our work in caring for our dying animal companions, either as professionals or as individual caregivers.

Are Pets Really Family?

We should be cautious about using the phrase “pets are family” as an endorsement of the way companion animals are treated, but should use the language of family very mindfully.

A Decent Minimum of Care for Companion Animals

The increasing range of options for caregivers of companion animals should be celebrated. And it should also remind us that although there can be too much of a good thing, there can also be too little. Far too many pets are denied basic care like dental hygeine, antibiotics, and treatment for pain.

A Path of Few Regrets

Decisional regret—the remorse or distress than patients or caregivers experience after making high-stakes health care decisions— is a real risk, especially in high stakes decisions such as euthanasia. Although much discussed in the human health care literature, decisional regret is rarely addressed in the veterinary context.

Dogs and the Death Penalty

Serious attention is being given to the human death penalty right now—both its overall constitutionality and morality, and also the particular methods by which it is carried out. This is a good opportunity to reexamine the use of death penalty language in relation to companion animals and assess whether it helps or harms.

Moving Beyond the Euthanasia Imperative

Why is natural death wrong for our companion animals? Why is it a dangerous idea that animals could be—at least in some circumstances—kept comfortable and shielded from significant suffering as they live out their last days? And to turn the question backwards, why is euthanasia the unchallenged imperative in veterinary medicine?

Doctors Googling Patients

Patients routinely research doctors on the Internet. Is it ethical for doctors to research their patients in return?

Heading toward First Human Head Transplant?

If “head transplant” sounds like the stuff of science fiction, think again. The possibility for such an operation seems to be drawing ever nearer. The surgeon is ready and a suitable patient has volunteered.

Sex with Animals

Is zoophilia, or sexual attraction to animals, a sexual orientation? Or is it a perversion? And is it possible to engage in zoo-sex without causing harm?

Is Euthanasia Just Another Pet Service?

Euthanasia is often listed alongside nail trimmings and flea treatment, as if it were one among a series of “services” a pet owner might seek out on a given day. Isn’t the killing of a pet a far more serious proposition, morally speaking, than a mere “pet service” like a vaccination or a quick shampoo?

6 Best Holiday Gifts for Your Dog

Here are six gifts your dog will really appreciate

The Yellow Dog Project

The Yellow Dog Project is an innovative global movement to identify and protect dogs who need their personal space respected. If widely understood as a symbol of “proceed with caution,” yellow ribbons could help dogs and their guardians interact safely with their community and could help prevent uncomfortable or dangerous encounters.