All About Wisdom

It can be difficult to define Wisdom, but people generally recognize it when they encounter it. Psychologists pretty much agree it involves an integration of knowledge, experience, and deep understanding that incorporates tolerance for the uncertainties of life as well as its ups and downs. There's an awareness of how things play out over time, and it confers a sense of balance.

Wise people generally share an optimism that life's problems can be solved and experience a certain amount of calm in facing difficult decisions. Intelligence—if only anyone could figure out exactly what it is—may be necessary for wisdom, but it definitely isn't sufficient; an ability to see the big picture, a sense of proportion, and considerable introspection also contribute to its development.

Recent Posts on Wisdom

Declare Your Independence from That Which Shackles You

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 04, 2015 in How To Do Life
Is it finally time to start throwing off your chains?

The Wisdom Mind of Love

It is worth stopping regularly for a period of reflection, to reconcile our 'everyday' mind with our 'wisdom' mind, to avoid the build-up of painful and destructive emotions like anxiety, anger, sadness, hate and greed.

3 Myths About Romantic Relationships You Probably Believe

By Peg Streep on July 01, 2015 in Tech Support
When we think about relationships, sometimes our thinking is just plain wrong or uninformed, thanks to the brain... Really,

What Would America's Founding Mothers Want?

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
When the philosophical foundations of America were being set by the "Founding Fathers", where were women's voices? How can we design a world that honors and integrates the unique value of women's perceptions of what society can be? What would you personally want to see in a global discussion of what the future can be?

Hunkering Down

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in How To Do Life
Finding contentment if, in our so-called improving economy, you're still struggling.

How the Ownership of Something Increases Our Valuations

When we own something we begin to value it more than other people do.

Body Language & Happiness

How do kids learn to be happy adults? Julius Fast, the author of Body Language (1970), was a childhood neighbor (my friend's dad) who taught us the answer to that mystery—in the way he lived. Quite literally, Body Language at it's best. Let him teach you as well.

Earth to Humans: Why Have You Forsaken Me? Poor Comparisons

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on June 26, 2015 in The Green Mind
What are the psychological roadblocks that explain why we’re not doing much to solve global climate change—a phenomenon that threatens the core of our society? This is the third post in a seven-part series.

Three Vital Differences Between Pride and Dignity

While maintaining a delicate sense of pride for our achievements in not necessarily a bad thing, it can easily solidify into an arrogant pride that distances us from others. We might do well to get clearer about what we're really wanting. Differentiating pride from dignity can help orient us toward what really nourishes and sustains us.

Are You Numb to Pleasure? How to See Life with New Eyes

We can have the most amazing life, if we live in the present moment without being attached or focused on the future; not being stuck in the past, just living in the now and seeing everything with those beginner eyes.

The Art of Idleness

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 25, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Research suggests that people will find any excuse to keep busy.

Beyond Atheism

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Excellent Beauty
Atheism, then, doesn’t really get at the heart of the matter. It is not that there are no gods or goddesses, but rather that there are no religions.

Ecomodernism's Promise of A Good (Great!) Future? Too Rosy

The Ecomodernist promise that human wisdom and its technologies can spare us a dystopian future is correct. But the promise of a good, even GREAT future, ignores our survival instincts to place ourselves and the immediate over the greater common good and the future. We're just not as wise as the Ecomodernists propose.

Tikkun Olam

By Robert J Landy Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Couch and Stage
In response to a previous blog of a very troubling dream about my attempt to sew together the head and body of two decapitated figures, my friend describes a transformational journey to Vienna where he is transfixed by the Rubens painting of Mary removing a thorn from the head of Jesus and discovers the meaning of Tikkun Olam, repairing of the world.

Earth to Humans: Why Hast Thou Forsaken Me? Ideologies

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on June 21, 2015 in The Green Mind
What are the psychological roadblocks that explain why we’re not doing much to solve global climate change—a phenomenon that threatens the core of our society? This is the second post in a seven-part series.

The Life of a Teacher

Teachers make a big difference in our lives. There's something we can do to make a small difference in theirs.

Miyamoto Musashi and Vision In Martial Arts

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on June 17, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Seeing is believing but can training help refine what we actually perceive?

Ways to Honor Lost Fathers

In spite of what many think is a crisis in fatherhood, there are still some fathers out there, alive and deceased who have had a positive impact on their children's lives. It's important to stop and reflect on the teachings and wisdoms of those men. This article offers personal and universal ideas on how to do this.

Earth to Humans: Why Have You Forsaken Me? Cognition

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on June 15, 2015 in The Green Mind
What are the psychological roadblocks that explain why we’re not trying hard at all to solve global climate change—a phenomenon that threatens the core of our society? The first post in a seven part series.

Playing, or in Play?

Celebrating creativity and resistance is important. But those who care about play must acknowledge the counter-theme that is fundamental to Greek mythology. We may feel ourselves driven to play; but we may also be "in play" as we realize our desires.

How Do You Make Up Your Mind?

Do you jump in trying to solve problems or take time to think them through?

Do You Know Your Father? Do You Like Him?

A bad father attaches an emotional price tag to everything, meaning that your success is his success, your failure is his failure and, essentially, nothing is ever yours. He’s not there as a support or a guide but as an overseer and a judge.

The Internal Battle of Sport

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on June 10, 2015 in In Control
Finding a space above the hum-drum, where the bigger picture becomes clearer to you, is the key to calming turbulent waters.

Teach Kids the Wisdom of Failure Long Before Graduation

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D on June 09, 2015 in Worry Wise
Our job is to not wait for graduation to talk about failure and success. It’s a little late then. Rather, we need to be rolling out the red carpet for our kids throughout their education. Making saying “I don’t know” or making mistakes safe. Making “I don’t know for sure” a noble and defendable position.

The Best Commencement Speech of All Time

What do we need to hear in commencement speeches—whether we're graduating or not?

Ten Things Women Need to Know About Sex and Relationships

By Isadora Alman MFT on June 05, 2015 in Sex & Sociability
Women's wisdom like these ten insights into sex and relationships are invaluable and rare.

Saying No: the Most Affirming and Authentic Thing You Can Do

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on June 04, 2015 in Living Single
The "Affirmative No" is "the refusal to pursue a course of action that, on serious reflection, you discover is not right for you." It can be the most important, affirming, and authentic act of your life.

May the 3rd Force Be With You

Rollo May, Fritz Perls, Carl Rogers, and Abraham Maslow meet in a bar.....

Throwing Bullets on the Fire

By John Sean Doyle on May 28, 2015 in Luminous Things
We look at the mindless and senseless things people do and it is easy to blame. How can they be so stupid? Didn’t they think for a moment? But as long as there is no ricochet or crash, we are allowed to forget that we too are irresponsible and thoughtless. Every one of us is negligent. But to be negligent and unlucky? That is a crime no one can ever shake off.

10 Eternal Rules of Our Social Lives

Evolutionary psychology has become famous as a powerful framework for understanding even the most mundane aspects of life. Read further to see how the evolutionary perspective provides insights into 10 common cliches.