Coping with Trauma

Psychological trauma may set in after a distressing or life-threatening event. Sufferers may develop extreme anxiety or PTSD, or they may have ongoing problems with relationships and self-esteem. But many overcome trauma, offering inspiration to others who have had life-altering negative experiences.

 

Recent Posts on Trauma

Mourning – Death, Loss, Trauma, and Psychotherapy

Mourning is the process by which we heal from grief. I’ve heard people say, “What’s the point of grieving, you can’t bring a loved one back from the dead.” That of course, is true, but it is what allows us, the survivors, to return back to the land of the living and resume our lives.

Understanding Why You Can’t Get to Sleep

Education and alternative therapies can provide healthy solutions to sleep abnormalities. Talk to a healthcare professional for additional information about getting a proper night’s sleep, safely and naturally.

Hiding From Relationship—In Relationship

The suppression of the emotional vitality that we call passion is both the benefit and the cost of irrelationship, and a side effect of the process that creates it. Relationships can be enlisted in the service of defense in many ways. In irrelationship, the enlistment is constructed by two people, and enforced by both.

Why Do All the Bad Boys Come in Such Beautiful Packages?

By breaking social norms and acting in unpredictable ways, bad boys inspire fascination in us. Bad equals attractive, because distortions and deformities to normal behavior produce a sense of thrill, something that is easily confused with being in love.

Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors

By The Book Brigade on March 03, 2015 in The Author Speaks
The millions of teens and adults who engage in self-destructive behavior do so because they never learned more constructive ways of soothing themselves in moments of distress. Many have engaged in such behaviors for so long that they can't envision a way out. But it's possible to replace self-destructive acts with kinder means of coping.

Theo Fleury Is Teaching Us How to Heal

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Former professional hockey player Theo Fleury is no stranger to confrontation, both on and off the ice. In 2009, he bravely and publicly confronted a very personal issue—sexual abuse and alcoholism. He explains how communication is pertinent to well-being, and even though the road ahead may not be easy, he truly believes that people can learn to heal.

The Borderline Mother II

A borderline mother can you hurt a child (even an adult child) in the blink of an eye. Here's what happens and how you can respond.

Parenthood and Resilience

By Michael W Austin on March 02, 2015 in Ethics for Everyone
Resilience is a crucial but often neglected trait that parents should try to build in their children.

Blank Spaces of Memory

By Bruce Poulsen Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Reality Play
Memory’s underpinnings have long been explored by artists and writers—from Klimt to Proust. Some contemporary works also deserve our attention.

Meaning is Where the Action Is

Whether a therapist’s expression of emotional understanding will produce therapeutic or counter-therapeutic effects will depend on the emotional meanings that such expressions have for the patient.

Intimate Partner Abuse: Walk Away Before the Cycle Starts

We should never live in fear of the people who say they love us.

They Talk, We Listen

By G.A. Bradshaw Ph.D., Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Bear in Mind
"I don’t know what happened, my Sweet Girl is gone. Yesterday she left in the morning and didn’t even say good-bye. She just left. I waited all day yesterday and she never came home, and today she’s still not home. I am really, really sad. I don’t even know what I am going to do with myself."

Should Health Care Providers Joke About Patients?

By Jean Kim M.D. on February 26, 2015 in Culture Shrink
Medical Gallows Humor can help providers cope, but at what cost to the care provider-patient relationship?

An Integrative Approach to Wellness Really Works

I had a cerebral bleed causing me to black out resulting in a serious automobile collision. Months later I had brain surgery. I was told by my doctors I was permanently brain damaged. Determined to get better, I set out on my journey to regain my life. So I experimented with a variety of different approaches to treatment, and got better!

Coping With Traumatic Brain Injury

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Talking About Trauma
Tricia Williams, a clinical neuropsychologist at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, explains how to improve child development and mental health for individuals coping with a TBI.

How to Respond When Trauma is Revealed

Asking clients questions about past or present experiences of trauma, abuse or neglect has become a standard part of the intake and assessment phases of most mental health treatment practices. The therapist’s initial responses can help set the stage for subsequent processing and healing.

5 Steps from Fear to Freedom

By Lissa Rankin M.D. on February 25, 2015 in Owning Pink
The journey from fear to freedom, which is all about coming into right relationship with uncertainty, is a predictable journey, one that many have traveled before you and many will travel after you.

How to Integrate Mindfulness Practices into the Classroom

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in The First Impression
How may college students benefit if mindfulness practices are introduced into their classes?

Grief: Is It Different for Suicide?

26 years after I first began figuring out how to tell people that my dad died by suicide, I’m still figuring it out. It’s not any easier.

What Do Scientists Know About Finding a Purpose in Life?

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on February 24, 2015 in Curious?
Providing information on the science of a purpose in life. heavy, beautiful, and of paramount importance

Grow a Key Inner Strength

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Your Wise Brain
Use these four questions help grow inner strengths. 1) What's the issue? 2) What psychological resource - inner strength - if it were more present in your mind, would really help with this issue? 3) How could you have experiences of this inner strength? 4) How could you help this experience of the inner strength really sink in to you?

Nobody Can Steal Spent Money

By Christopher Ryan on February 22, 2015 in Sex at Dawn
Can we stop acting as if not dying is an option? Listen carefully, and you'll hear people say things like, "If I die, I want it to be painless." If? There is no "if" about it.

The 'Journey' of Psychotherapy

The “Journey” of Psychotherapy: On a voyage with an eating disordered patient. By Hilary Maddux, LCSW

Witnessing an Abusive Relationship -- 'Whiplash': the Movie

By Barbara Schildkrout on February 22, 2015 in The Clinical Picture
This psychological review of the film "Whiplash" discusses one of the most powerful but least apparent dynamics in an abusive relationship -- the manipulation of truth. “Whiplash” was nominated for Best Picture 2015. J.K. Simmons won the award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role.

The Sound Of Silence

By Lynne Soraya on February 21, 2015 in Asperger's Diary
I have recently come face-to-face with a fact about myself: I have a problem with silence. I’m not really sure why.

Mindfulness for Chronic Pain

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on February 20, 2015 in In One Lifespan
There is a strong emerging body of evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches for a range of difficulties, including chronic pain. We tried to take mindfulness for chonic pain online. We called our programme Mindfulness in Action (MIA). The results of our MIA trial were interesting.

ADHD Medication Linked to Fewer ER Visits

By David Rettew M.D. on February 20, 2015 in ABCs of Child Psychiatry
A new study of 17,000 kids in Hong Kong finds a reduction of ER visits during periods when children with ADHD are taking medication.

Discussing Illness Without Alienating the Ill

By Julie K Hersh on February 20, 2015 in Struck By Living
The arts offer an unthreatening microscope and telescope to examine stories, which we can adapt to our own healing.

On Developing a C.A.L.M. M.O.

By Gregg Henriques on February 20, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
A C.A.L.M. M.O. is a stance of "Meta-cognitively Observing" our thoughts and feelings with a Curious, Accepting, Loving compassionate attitude that is Motivated to learn more and grow from a position of security.

12 Ways to Spot a Misogynist

The misogynists. You may have heard of them. But what you may not know is that they can be anywhere around you. They are notoriously hard to spot. They do not come with a label attached to them, and they may even come across as woman lovers.