What Is Psychotherapy?

Psychotherapy is the practice of spending time with a trained therapist to help diagnose and treat mental and emotional problems. Therapy can take various forms—cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, psychodynamic therapy, or a combination of these—but at the center of each is the caring relationship between a mental health professional and a patient.

Recent posts on Therapy

Translating Trauma: Foreign Language Interpreting in Therapy

Language is an essential part of cultural competence. Therapy with a foreign language interpreter can be awkward but help is available. Beverley Costa PhD offers tips.
Kristen Fuller

Eating Disorders: It’s Not All About Food

We often think if we lose those ten pounds, gain muscle or adopt that healthy skin glow then we will feel better to only soon realize our self-esteem is still in the gutter.

Family Dysfunction: How Therapists Get the Whole Story

Therapists have several useful techniques for getting shameful, protective, or guilty patients to open up and tell the whole story regarding dysfunction in their families.

How "Daily Uplifts" Can Counter Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
When we're depressed we tend to think that nothing will lift our mood. Results from a new study suggest otherwise.

Can You Lie to Your Lover?

For a relationship to work, must we always tell the truth?

The Self Illusion and Psychotherapy

The self is an illusion and, as I noted in a recent paper published in Australasian Psychiatry, we can tailor psychotherapy to highjack the mechanisms that create it.

Why We Care Whether the Earth Is Flat

Much of life is Jeopardy, not Family Feud. We want to know the actual state of affairs, not what the survey says.

You Are What You Think

Ways to change common negative thoughts and make positive life changes.

Time Spent in an Art Museum Can Be Good Therapy

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on March 20, 2017 in Minding the Body
Researchers Lisa and Jeffrey Smith have spent years studying how people behave in art museums and what they get out of the experience. Here's what the Smiths' latest study shows.

A Dietary Treatment for Depression

In a world first, Australian researchers have used a dietary change to successfully treat depression.

Recovering From Trauma and Its Obstacles

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on March 17, 2017 in The New Normal
The power of self-care.

The Therapist-Patient Alliance

By Lybi Ma on March 17, 2017 in Brainstorm
True stories of therapy.

Do You Worry?

Worry is an ordinary part of human experience: a protection from danger, a sign that we care, and a struggle to face the inevitable uncertainties of life.

Sensate Focus in Sex Therapy: The Illustrated Manual

By The Book Brigade on March 16, 2017 in The Author Speaks
For many people problems in sexual response arise from the inability to put aside their conscious, goal-oriented mind.

What It's Like on Both Sides of the Therapy Couch

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on March 15, 2017 in Singletons
Ever wonder what your therapist is thinking? Or what your patient is not telling?

Attending to the Unconscious in a Psychotherapy Session

By Karen L Smith MSS, LCSW on March 15, 2017 in Full Living
Lots of folks can offer counsel to our clients. Our job is to help them access clues from their unconscious about the turmoils of their soul.

For My Health. And Yours.

By Dean Olsher MA, MT-BC on March 14, 2017 in A Sound Mind
National Creative Arts Therapy week, the third week of March, recognizes young professions built around ancient human activities.

5 Major Differences Between REBT & CBT

Looking for an effective, efficient psychotherapy? Understanding the differences between REBT and CBT will go a long way.

Different Types of Trauma: Small 't' versus Large ‘T’

By Elyssa Barbash Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Trauma and Hope
Are you feeling stressed and unable to cope, but don't understand why? There may be good reasons for that.

Is There a Right to Grieve?

By Kenneth J. Doka Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Good Mourning
Some losses simply are not recognized by others. How can we enfranchise disenfranchised grief?

Generation X Uses Mental Health Care Services Differently

Changes in the use of psychotropic medications during a 5 year interval varied among individuals in different generational cohorts.

6 Ways That Tricks for Falling Asleep Can Backfire

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
Chronic sleep problems can be demoralizing. What are the potential downsides of tricks for falling asleep? And what's the best way to beat insomnia?

Admissions (and Job) Interviews in Clinical Programs

The selection process is a window into the program’s vision of what psychology is.
John Hain CCO Public Domain/Used with Permission

Why We Shouldn’t Fear Failure

Why We Shouldn’t Fear Failure. Sometimes success requires not getting it right the first time. By Philip J. Rosenbaum, Ph.D.

Why the Clinical Use of Psychedelics May Heal Sexual Trauma

Recent research indicates that psychedelics can assist in healing sexual trauma by increasing the personality trait of openness to new experiences.

Should I leave This Person?

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on March 12, 2017 in Fighting Fear
Frequently, a patient asks me if he/she should leave the person he/she is dating. Usually, that person's friends make that recommendation. I do not usually--for different reasons.

Does This Unrealistic Expectation Contribute to Your Anger?

One belief that may heighten destructive anger and an often neglected approach to move past it.

Fostering Independence In Your Child

Resisting the urge to rescue and over-assist can make a huge difference in your child's sense of self.

Five Forgiveness Exercises for Couples

Do you want a stronger relationship with your partner? If so, you might try these five forgiveness exercises.

The Power of Stories to Heal or Harm

Stories can help us heal from painful life events. They can also divide us from one another and lead to terrible violence.