All About Teamwork

Let's work together: On the playing field, at the office, raising children. Humans are social animals, and civilization is the result of pooled effort. So it pays to figure out what got us here, and how we can continue to join forces going forward.

Recent Posts on Teamwork

9 Things Only Passive-Aggressive People Do

While most people take the passive-aggressive approach once in a while, for some people manipulation and indirect communication become a way of life.

Do You Know Your Derailment Factors? Part One.

By Megan Dalla-Camina on August 31, 2015 in Real Women
Knowing your derailment factors is critical to your career success. In Part One of this two part series, business and leadership strategist Megan Dalla-Camina outlines 6 of the twelve factors you need to be thinking about to maximise your success.

Women's Sexual Fantasies - the Latest Scientific Research

It's important to note that while headline writers may focus on the fact women have sexual fantasies about coercive sex, this research finds it's an occasional daydream, not a preoccupation. It would be similarly unfair to tar men with the brush of an occasional fantasy they may have.

Can We Trust Psychological Studies?

By Mark van Vugt Ph.D. on August 28, 2015 in Naturally Selected
Failure to replicate many psychological experiments offers gloomy picture of our field. Yet it is not as bad as it looks and there are ways out of the replication "crisis."

The perils of our “on-call” work culture

By Craig Dowden Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in The Leader's Code
It may surprise you that we are all "on-call" and it is taking a toll.

4 Most Common Ways to Derail a Career

There are a variety of factors that can derail our careers, cause us to lose jobs or promotions, and lead to unending stress. Here are the most common career derailers.

Career Advice for Geniuses (Revised and Expanded)

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in How To Do Life
Smart people don't have it as easy as many people think. Help is here.

Amazon and Toxic Workplaces

By Ray Williams on August 26, 2015 in Wired for Success
A recent expose of Amazon’s work culture in a New York Times report brings into focus the growing problem of toxic work cultures in North America, one that will take a huge toll on long term productivity and employee well being.

When Should Your Young Athlete Specialize?

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in The Power of Prime
This question torments every parent who wants to support their children’s efforts as they pursue their own personal greatness in a sport. If you want your kids to stay healthy, stay motivated, and perform better, the experts and the research say that multisport participation is the way to go. But the messages from our culture tell parents something very different.

9 Subtle Habits that Could be Killing Your Career

Just one or two bad habits can prevent you from advancing your career.

How Introverts and Extroverts Can Make Professional Magic

By Sophia Dembling on August 21, 2015 in The Introvert's Corner
Introverts and extroverts can achieve extraordinary results when they learn how to work together, according to author Jennifer Kahnweiler.

This Is Your Brain On College Football

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on August 21, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Beyond Social Tribalism, BIRGing, CORFing, and Tailgating - the brain needs its football.

Collaboration, a Core of Humanity

By Lybi Ma on August 19, 2015 in Brainstorm
We can and do benefit from collaboration. A guest post by Mish Middelmann

Does the Impulse to Gossip Have a Silver Lining for Markets?

The urge to let others know when you've been taken advantage of, and instinctively knowing that almost all of us have it, may play a big role in helping markets to function well--most recently including ones relying on online reviews such as eBay, airbnb, and trip advisor. I describe a novel laboratory experiment that demonstrates the tendency to tell in its purest form.

When You're Not Supposed to Laugh

By Bernard L. De Koven on August 13, 2015 in On Having Fun
For some people, like people with autism, or people who think of themselves as rejected, isolated, alienated; Not Laughing games are probably more important than we could possibly guess.

Recovering from Injury and Illness

Getting past recovery and to empowerment is difficult, but necessary, work.

Can the Mystery of the Dog Be Solved?

By Mark Derr on August 10, 2015 in Dog's Best Friend
Dogs did not domesticate themselves in early human garbage dumps, despite what many believe.

Foolishness of Using Young Children as Bat Boys

By Stephen Greenspan Ph.D. on August 09, 2015 in Incompetence
The recent death of a nine-year-old bat boy for a Kansas amateur baseball team is a tragedy that has caused a reexamination of the appropriateness of using young children in a potentially dangerous role. In fact, Major League Baseball adopted a 14 year minimum age requirement after a near tragedy in a 2002 World Series game.

Grid Irony? Taunting Initiatives and the NFL

With taunting penalties on the books since the mid 1980's, the NFL has the opportunity to take on much more than jeers, derision, and game-related 'in-your-face' posturing. By modelling and showcasing what it already proclaims—that ridicule, disparagement and discrimination will not be tolerated—the league reinforces social, anti-bullying agendas.

Dogs: The Ultimate Team Players

By Jennifer Arnold on August 06, 2015 in Through a Dog’s Eyes
Creating a You + Me = We connection with your dog.

Student-Athlete...or Athlete-Student?

By Alexis Hatcher on August 05, 2015 in Psy-College-y Today
Despite what colleges claim, academics doesn’t always end up coming first. Here's an athlete's perspective on why that is.

To the Finish Line

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Mary Woods of WestBridge.

WOSPs, the Amalfi Coast, and Unstructured Play in Children

By John Tauer Ph.D. on August 02, 2015 in Goal Posts
Why Can't Kids Play on Their Own?

At the End of Life

When I was a third-year medical student rotating for the first time on a general medicine service inpatient ward, my team admitted a thirty-year-old woman in acute congestive heart failure. That a thirty-year-old was in congestive heart failure was unusual enough. Even more shocking was the cause: an echocardiogram revealed a tumor sitting on top of her mitral valve

Donald Trump and Our Obsession With Narcissistic Leaders

By Ray Williams on July 28, 2015 in Wired for Success
Americans are obsessed with narcissistic leaders, or at least they have an ambivalence between the ones they like and the ones they promote.

Memory, Body Language and Personality in Soccer

By Ben Lyttleton on July 27, 2015 in Twelve Yards
USA lost its Gold Cup soccer play-off to Panama on penalties - but could the team have avoided defeat?

Breaking The Bystander Effect in Sports Concussions

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on July 24, 2015 in Brain Trauma
We witness concussions frequently, yet from the sidelines and stands, we may gasp or cringe. But we definitely won't do or say anything, right? It's the dreaded "Bystander Effect," that has people stunned still when someone yells, "call 911!" However, I propose every youth sports team in the US empower a "Concussion Coordinator" to solve this problem.

Are You a Giver or a Taker?

Think you are a Giver? There's something to watch out for that could turn you into a Taker.

Get Real About Teamwork

When a team mate is uncooperative, you may be tempted to ignore it to maintain the harmony. But if you do this all the time, fake cooperation gets confused with real cooperation. You shouldn't have to choose between team work and reality. Here's a way to have both.

Penalty Shoot-Outs Are Not a Lottery

By Ben Lyttleton on July 23, 2015 in Twelve Yards
Why scoring a penalty-kick in soccer is more about the mind than the foot