Stress is simply a reaction to a stimulus that disturbs our physical or mental equilibrium. In other words, it's an omnipresent part of life. A stressful event can trigger the “fight-or-flight” response, causing hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol to surge through the body. A little bit of stress, known as “acute stress,” can be exciting—it keeps us active and alert. But long-term, or “chronic stress,” can have detrimental effects on health. You may not be able to control the stressors in your world, but you can alter your reaction to them.

Recent Posts on Stress

Teenagers Are From Earth

Our black-and-white thinking about adolescence is getting in our way.

9 Warning Signs of Burnout

Burnout has been described as the biggest occupational hazard of the twenty-first century. Educating busy professionals and workplaces about its warning signs is a big first step in reducing its impact.

Work-Life Balance is Dead

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Glue
Technology has made work-life balance obsolete. Here's why we should aim for work-life integration instead.

Genetics of Longevity

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 27, 2015 in iAge
There is a schism between lifespan and theoretical lifespan…human behavior.

Are You a Survivor of Sexual Assault and Afraid of Flying?

12 Air travel tips for sexual assault survivors who are afraid of flying

Balancing Your Stress Levels One Relationship at a Time

By Amy Banks on March 26, 2015 in Wired For Love
The capacity to feel calm in a healthy relationship is as natural and automatic as the ability to feel terrified watching Friday the 13th. It is how we are wired. However, a culture that teaches “self-regulation” and urges you to stand on your own two feet is sending the wrong message to your nervous system.

Somatic Experiencing

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is a powerful method of overcoming trauma via the mind-body connection, and often without medication. This piece by Saint-Laurent and Bird is a great introduction for those considering the treatment as well as for therapists interested in SE training.

Surprise

By The Book Brigade on March 26, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Surprise is good for the brain, great for relationships, and adds a certain frisson all around. Without it, life is lackluster. So why don't more people embrace the unexpected? They run from it or try to subdue it when they should instead roll with it.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

As uncomfortable as it is to accept, we now have to deal with the fact that a pilot locked his fellow pilot out of the cockpit and intentionally flew a plane filled with passengers into a mountainside.

4 Steps to End Emotional Eating

Is food your best friend and your worst enemy? It doesn't have to be this way.

Should Autism Be Diagnosed in Infancy?

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on March 25, 2015 in Child in Mind
Autism research is coming out from the shadows of the "refrigerator mother theory' to show the importance of working with parent and child together to promote healthy development

Are You on the Fence? 10 Questions to Help Set Yourself Free

By Peg Streep on March 25, 2015 in Tech Support
Are you someone who second-guesses every big decision to death? Do you find yourself unable to move one way or another? Here are some questions that can possibly help...

What to Consider When Adding to Your Four-Legged Family

Choosing a new canine companion can be daunting. Should you adopt a shelter pet or buy from a breeder? Would a puppy or adult dog be a better fit for your life style and family? In this blog Dr. Stepita discusses what to consider before bringing your next furry family member home.

When You Don't Have Time for Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Now that spring has sprung, it's a good time to focus on becoming healthier. For many, this may sound like an overwhelming task. But creating small, reasonable goals is the best way to make lifestyle changes.

How Drug Addiction Impacts Infant Care

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Me in We
Drug abuse short circuits neural connections between child and caregiver.

Resilience: 4 Ways to Move Forward After Time Stands Still

Resiliency is a gift, but in some ways it is an art that can be cultivated.

Research Backs Schools' Decision to Ditch Outdated Homework

By Rebecca Jackson on March 24, 2015 in School of Thought
Parents are not given any instruction on how to administer homework. It's assumed that they understand how—presumably based on their own experiences in school. That's ridiculous. Homework has changed dramatically over the past two decades! This article sifts through the current research to show why some homework methods are outdated.

We Really Do Die Alone

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Brick by Brick
When working to improve public health, there are often many things that we simply can't change. Social isolation has proven to be a robust and significant risk factor of poor health and early mortality. And there is something we can do about it.

Are You a Traumatized Woman?

By Rosemary K.M. Sword on March 24, 2015 in The Time Cure
When we peruse the landscape of our world half the women we see have experienced a life-altering traumatic event, perhaps a natural disaster like a tornado, or a human-made disaster such as a car accident. And 1 in 3 women will experience sexual assault in their lifetime. But this number is probably much higher because these are only reported cases.

10 Ways Musical Training Boosts Brain Power

A wide range of new research shows that playing a musical instrument can boost brain function throughout a person's lifespan.

The One-Minute Group Meditation

Of all the interventions available for facilitators, this one minute at the end of group has impressed me most.

10 Ways to Calm Your Interview Anxiety

It's normal to feel stressed or anxious before an important job interview. Your anxiety can motivate you but can also distract you, so here are 10 quick tips to tame it.

The New Adulthood

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in The Prime of Life
The challenge: To lead a life without well-define norms, roles, and expectations.

Why We Like (Or Don't Like) Comfort Foods

By Vinita Mehta Ph.D., Ed.M. on March 23, 2015 in Head Games
We all know that stress can affect your diet. But a new study finds that there's much more to the story.

Is A Bad MarrIage Dangerous To Your Health?

Is an alienated spouse a matter of life or death?

Addicted to Being Right!

I’ve found that even the best fighters – the proverbial smartest guys in the room – can break their addiction to being right by getting hooked on oxytocin-inducing behavior instead. Connecting and bonding with others trumps conflict. The more you learn about other peoples’ perspectives, the more likely you are to feel empathy for them.

The Politicization of Mental Health

By David J Ley Ph.D. on March 22, 2015 in Women Who Stray
Shootings, deaths and tragedies involving mental illness fill our news every day. Politicians are talking about mental health more than ever before. But, most political efforts to reform these issues ignore the deep underlying issues of funding, regulatory complexity and access which inhibit real reform.

Living Comfortably with Hypocrisy and Negative Evidence

By Warren W Tryon Ph.D. on March 22, 2015 in The Missing Link
How do people live comfortably with hypocrisy and negative evidence?

Coming Out as Polyamorous, Part II

This blog explores strategies for coming out to families, friends, and kids about being polyamorous.

Hello Spring and Good Thoughts

You can think good thoughts too....