Stress is simply a reaction to a stimulus that disturbs our physical or mental equilibrium. In other words, it's an omnipresent part of life. A stressful event can trigger the “fight-or-flight” response, causing hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol to surge through the body. A little bit of stress, known as “acute stress,” can be exciting—it keeps us active and alert. But long-term, or “chronic stress,” can have detrimental effects on health. You may not be able to control the stressors in your world, but you can alter your reaction to them.

Recent Posts on Stress

3 Ways to Boost Your Mental Strength

If you want a strong mind, you need to exercise it daily.

Smashing the Glass Ceiling: Women Rangers

By Michael D. Matthews Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Head Strong
Military psychologists have played an important role in the successful integration of women into combat and other non-traditional military jobs.

When Social Media Goes Too Far

At last count, the video depicting the tragic fatal shooting of a young news reporter in Virginia had garnered over 10 million views on social media. Despite warnings of its extremely graphic content- or perhaps because of that warning- as soon as the video was posted it went viral. Why is it that so many people were drawn to something so disturbing?

How Trump Trumps Pressure

What do Tom Brady and Donald Trump have in common?

Why Are We So Prone to Feeling Crazy?

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on August 27, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
How our nature nurtures feelings of insanity. If we’re not stressed out and feeling crazy right at this moment, we’ve probably paid a recent visit to that neighborhood – and are likely to return in the very near future. Our own thinking may twist us – but it can also uncrumple us again.

Another Mass Shooting

Yesterday the nation was shocked by another mass murder. How can parents talk with their children about these events? Here are some tips for parents as a guide to help kids deal with exposure to violent events.

The One Thing to Remember to Beat Insomnia

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBT-I, is a powerful non-drug treatment. Find out one of the main principles that underlies its effectiveness.

Dreams Can Help You Solve Problems

By Michelle Carr on August 26, 2015 in Dream Factory
Several authors have shown that current emotional problems are frequently incorporated into dreams, and further, dreaming may provide creative solutions to these problems.

Memories of Trauma

By David Myers on August 26, 2015 in Talk Psych
Imagine yourself as a traumatized passenger on a transatlantic flight that has run out of fuel and is seemingly destined to crash in the ocean. Such was the real life experience of psychologist Margaret MacKinnon, who, with colleagues, later compared passengers' memories with actual flight events. Their findings teach us a lesson about human memory.

Reducing Our Children's Stress During The School Year

By Allison Carmen on August 26, 2015 in The Gift of Maybe
As our children are heading back to school, they may already appear a little more stressed. Within weeks of school starting, our children can become irritable, sleep less and you may notice things getting out of whack with family life at home. Here are six tips you can use to help reduce your child's stress so they can feel more balanced and get their work done.

How To Manage Situations and Emotions of Acute Stress

By Garth Sundem on August 26, 2015 in Brain Trust
The ability to keep stress in a productive “Goldilocks zone” depends less on what you have to deal with and more on how you deal with it. Here's how.

Anger's Allure: Are You Addicted to Anger?

By Jean Kim M.D. on August 25, 2015 in Culture Shrink
Anger is becoming an epidemic; it's worth exploring the biological and psychological reasons why anger can become addictive for people, and alternatives to kick the habit.

More Evidence For Meditation

By Temma Ehrenfeld on August 25, 2015 in Open Gently
Chinese mindfulness practice can lower cortisol levels in a week.

Speaking Up for Yourself, Part 1

The idea of boundaries feels like I may be asking them to put up a wall, to keep others away or just be alone without anyone near them.If you are depressed the idea of creating boundaries that separate you would make you feel much worse.

5 Stress Resilience Strategies for Students

A recent APA Stress survey, reporting specifically on the stress levels of teens, found that during the school year many teens report stress levels higher than reported by adults. Teens often underestimate the potential impact stress has on their physical and mental well-being. Teens and college students can manage the effects of stress by building their stress resilience

Open the Windows!

Fresh from Nature air is good for body and mind.

What Mindfulness App Is Right for You?

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on August 22, 2015 in Urban Survival
New study reveals the top 4 mindfulness apps. Which one fits your personality best?

4 Ways to Keep Your Perfectionism from Getting You Down

Always wanting your life, and everything in it, to be perfect can become a thankless enterprise. In addition to the fact that perfection is almost impossible to achieve, striving for the ideal can cause your stress levels to mount. These 4 tips will help you keep perfectionism under control.

Dealing with an Intense Person

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 21, 2015 in How To Do Life
Hard-driving people can be invaluable...if you know how to bring out the best in them.

Walk in Nature: Good for Brain, Good for Spirit

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on August 20, 2015 in The First Impression
How can exposure to nature enrich our brain and mental health?

Employees Can’t Be Summed Up by a Personality Test

By Peter Bregman on August 19, 2015 in How We Work
“When with a group of people,” she read, “you enjoy being at the center of attention.” “No.” I answered. “I’d rather speak to one person.” “No way!” she replied, “You love being the center of attention. I’m checking a big YES.” She must have changed at least half my answers. I’m not saying she was wrong. Most of the time, I think we were both right.

How to Stop Irritating Thoughts in Seconds

By Steve Sisgold on August 19, 2015 in Life in a Body
To stop negative thinking on demand, I find it wise to step back and remember that you always have a choice when it comes to your thinking

8 Tips for Coping with the Stress of Trying to Conceive

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on August 19, 2015 in In Practice
How to stay sane while trying to get pregnant.

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on August 18, 2015 in Mental Wealth
By disrupting sleep, suppressing the brain's frontal lobe, raising stress hormones, and fracturing attention, daily screen-time is making children become the worst version of themselves.

Living with Type-A Behavior

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 18, 2015 in How To Do Life
You're a hurried, angry person. Now what?

Behavioral "Red Flags" in the Dog

Dogs show many different signs that they are stressed or scared. Understanding their body language can help an owner or caregiver understand the dog's mindset, avoiding being bit, and make events more pleasant for their dogs.

Evolutionary Mismatch

Neuroplasticity in action

How to Make the Best of a Bad Situation

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on August 17, 2015 in In Practice
Dealing with life's lemony moments.

The Imagery Edge

Imagery is one of the key psychological skills for optimal performance. In this story, a tennis player develops images to help cope with post-surgical pain.

Consider These Terms of Engagement Before Your Next Argument

Remember that it’s not the differences themselves that damage the fabric of trust and respect in relationships, but the unskillful ways in which we react to them that do the most harm.