What Are SSRIs?

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (or SSRIs) are a class of antidepressants prescribed for depression and anxiety disorders. They work by increasing the amount of the neurotransmitter serotonin. First developed in the 1970s, allegedly with fewer side effects than their predecessors, they continue to generate controversy. Like most antidepressants, the SSRIs are most effective when used in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy and other forms of therapy

Recent Posts on SSRIs

Antidepressants and Violence: A Link in Search of a Cause

A controversial study links higher youth crime rates with antidepressant use. Before making broad conclusions, however, it’s worth reading the fine print.

The Truth About "Study 329"

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on September 16, 2015 Side Effects
A major new study about a blockbuster antidepressant.

Apples, Oranges, and Metatheory

This article utilizes an example regarding the concrete existence of "apples" and "oranges" as compared to the concept of "fruit". Psychosis, like apples and oranges, has a visceral and immediate quality, and the actuality of brain chemistry regarding psychosis is a metatheory that subsumes the "theories" of psychotic individuals.

Coming Out of the Mental Illness Closet

By Eliezer Sobel on September 09, 2015 The 99th Monkey
I am mentally ill. It sounds a bit shocking to hear myself say that. Such a notion had never even occurred to me, until recently. My unexamined assumption was that mentally ill people were the ones living in institutions, ranting and raving and disrobing in public. They were schizophrenic, psychotic, and secured in lockdown wards.

Bad Science Creates False and Dangerous Beliefs

Science is what is used to justify psychiatry today. If it is science at all, it is bad science. Both the pharmaceutical industry and many of today’s psychological theories including those that support CBT, employ the hoax of evidence-based psychiatry.

Beware the Witch-hunt: Depression, Pilots and Air Crashes

Should pilots undertake regular psychological assessment? And how to make it accurate and reliable?

Psychiatry in Crisis

By Neel Burton M.D. on August 15, 2015 Hide and Seek
Is the medical model still helping?

Exercise Your Way Out of Anxiety and Depression?

When the stress hormones surge, learn how exercise can help you deal.

Psychiatric Drugs Are False Prophets With Big Profits

The underling theory of somatic psychiatry is that the source of human struggle is considered to be the brain itself, rather than the person. Treatments that follow from this simplistic, mechanistic, and reductionist notion have been to act directly on the brain, always with violating and destructive outcomes. This is now the tenet of the American Psychiatric Society.

Some Medications May Alter Childhood Brain Development

Medications that disrupt REM sleep may alter brain structure during critical phases of child development.

Nature’s Antidepressant: The Dog

How do dogs work their magic on our mood? Researchers believe a big part of the answer is found in the chemical oxytocin, also known as the “love hormone.” Dogs also affect our moods less directly, by being the catalyst of situations that help keep low spirits at bay, whether they spring from a diagnosed mood disorder or just a tough day at the office.

Can We Really Die of a Broken Heart?

Medical research shows that poets and songwriters are right--we can indeed die of a broken heart.

Who's Helping You Lose Weight From Your Antidepressant?

So many people gain weight from prescription drugs. Why isn't this more widely discussed?

Common Anti-Depressants Do Cause Weight Gain

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 06, 2015 Open Gently
Wellbutrin causes less weight gain than other common anti-depressants.

Mechanics of the Placebo Effect

A look at how the placebo effect works

Mindfulness Versus Antidepressants: Which Works Best?

Antidepressants don’t suit everyone, and side effects are common. Could mindfulness-based cognitive therapy be a viable alternative?

Pilot Suicide: A Likely Scenario

By Nassir Ghaemi M.D., M.P.H. on March 31, 2015
Suicide is unpredictable. It was depression. The antidepressants caused it. Why all these views are questionable, and why there is a more probable psychiatric scenario to explain the recent German pilot suicide.

Mental Health Screening Wouldn't Have Saved Germanwings 9525

By Jean Kim M.D. on March 30, 2015 Culture Shrink
Screening must balance concerns of rare high-risk cases versus the vast majority of functional people with mental illness trying to overcome stigma and judgment

Is Digital Life Risky?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 The Human Beast
Young people who grew up with digital technologies and cannot conceive of a life without the Internet, digital games, and social media are sometimes called “digital natives” whereas older generations who acquired these technologies as adults are “digital immigrants.” Digital natives have many advantages but “addiction” to screens has its critics.

Top 10 Ways to Get Over a Breakup

The time immediately following the shock of a breakup and the time of a mad obsession are driven by the overflow of stress chemicals released by your brain in response to what is happening to you. This is a time when you are likely to act crazy! Breakup chemistry is insanity chemistry. Temper your stirred-up emotions by sticking to these 10 pieces of breakup advice.

If an Antidepressant Makes You Thin While You Are Taking It

How can you keep pounds off after antidepressant therapy has served its purpose?

America's Top Selling Drug

There’s nearly no end to the money the U.S. health care system will spend on problems that can be addressed more economically.

How We Fall Out of Love

Though there has been extensive research looking at the psychology of romantic love, is it possible to learn what can cause people to fall out of love with their significant other? For that matter, how is it possible to move on after a relationship comes to an end? A new article published in Review of General Psychology raises some intriguing questions about this.

Hopeful Research for Stopping Suicides

Promising suicide research in military

Is Overprescription of Antidepressants Sexist?

A thoughtful editorial in today's New York Times, made me consider a new reason for concern about the overprescription of antidepressants: they are written disproportionately to females and may be suppressing women's natural emotionality.

Empty Man Syndrome

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 PreFrontal Nudity
For some people depression is a hole they can't ever seem to climb out of. Often there are several factors conspiring against them.

Healthy Relationships Overlooked in Search for a Quick Fix

By Amy Banks on February 28, 2015 Wired For Love
Simply thinking about your strongest relationships can change your brain chemistry in a positive way. Imagine the benefits of being face to face with the people you love!

Antidepressant Superstition

Why do people become dependent on drugs that are no more effective than sugar pills?

The Missing Link Between Psychology and Biology

By Warren W Tryon Ph.D. on February 10, 2015 The Missing Link
How does psychology influence biology? How does biology influence psychology? Read on to find an answer.