What Are SSRIs?

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (or SSRIs) are a class of antidepressants prescribed for depression and anxiety disorders. They work by increasing the amount of the neurotransmitter serotonin. First developed in the 1970s, allegedly with fewer side effects than their predecessors, they continue to generate controversy. Like most antidepressants, the SSRIs are most effective when used in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy and other forms of therapy

Recent Posts on SSRIs

Mechanics of the Placebo Effect

A look at how the placebo effect works

Mindfulness Versus Antidepressants: Which Works Best?

Antidepressants don’t suit everyone, and side effects are common. Could mindfulness-based cognitive therapy be a viable alternative?

7 Secrets to Hitting Your Reset Button

Dr. Michael Roizen, co-author with Dr. Oz on the best-selling YOU series, has just published a new book, “This is Your Do-Over.” The book provides 7 secrets to better physical health. Fortunately, these same secrets are the pathway to positive mental health, happiness, and well-being.

Faulty Reporting on ADHD

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on April 11, 2015 in Side Effects
Newspaper of record criticized for its tardy response to overmedicalization.

Pilot Suicide: A Likely Scenario

By Nassir Ghaemi M.D., M.P.H. on March 31, 2015 in
Suicide is unpredictable. It was depression. The antidepressants caused it. Why all these views are questionable, and why there is a more probable psychiatric scenario to explain the recent German pilot suicide.

Mental Health Screening Wouldn't Have Saved Germanwings 9525

By Jean Kim M.D. on March 30, 2015 in Culture Shrink
Screening must balance concerns of rare high-risk cases versus the vast majority of functional people with mental illness trying to overcome stigma and judgment

Say ‘No’ to the Fiction of Brain Diseases

During my lifetime I have witnessed the fall of Freudian psychiatry and the ascension of molecular psychiatry. Unfortunately, we have gone from the frying pan into the fire. We need to restore psychiatry where it belongs. The psychotherapy of character is an art and a science that bridges the old divide between psychotherapy and the brain.

Suicide or Mass Murder? : The Deliberate Downing of Flt 9525

By Stephen A Diamond Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Evil Deeds
What motivates suicidal mass killings like the deliberate downing of Germanwings Flt. 9525?

One Pilot’s Suicide Prompts a Call for Common Sense

By Julie K Hersh on March 29, 2015 in Struck By Living
The Germanwings crash causes a new look at regulations for pilots. Do current FAA regulations cause pilots to hide depression and bipolar disease, resulting in more severe illness?

Is Digital Life Risky?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Human Beast
Young people who grew up with digital technologies and cannot conceive of a life without the Internet, digital games, and social media are sometimes called “digital natives” whereas older generations who acquired these technologies as adults are “digital immigrants.” Digital natives have many advantages but “addiction” to screens has its critics.

Top 10 Ways to Get Over a Breakup

The time immediately following the shock of a breakup and the time of a mad obsession are driven by the overflow of stress chemicals released by your brain in response to what is happening to you. This is a time when you are likely to act crazy! Breakup chemistry is insanity chemistry. Temper your stirred-up emotions by sticking to these 10 pieces of breakup advice.

If an Antidepressant Makes You Thin While You Are Taking It

How can you keep pounds off after antidepressant therapy has served its purpose?

America's Top Selling Drug

There’s nearly no end to the money the U.S. health care system will spend on problems that can be addressed more economically.

How We Fall Out of Love

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on March 09, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Though there has been extensive research looking at the psychology of romantic love, is it possible to learn what can cause people to fall out of love with their significant other? For that matter, how is it possible to move on after a relationship comes to an end? A new article published in Review of General Psychology raises some intriguing questions about this.

Hopeful Research for Stopping Suicides

Promising suicide research in military

Is Overprescription of Antidepressants Sexist?

A thoughtful editorial in today's New York Times, made me consider a new reason for concern about the overprescription of antidepressants: they are written disproportionately to females and may be suppressing women's natural emotionality.

Empty Man Syndrome

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
For some people depression is a hole they can't ever seem to climb out of. Often there are several factors conspiring against them.

Healthy Relationships Overlooked in Search for a Quick Fix

By Amy Banks on February 28, 2015 in Wired For Love
Simply thinking about your strongest relationships can change your brain chemistry in a positive way. Imagine the benefits of being face to face with the people you love!

Antidepressant Superstition

By Jonathan Shedler PhD on February 10, 2015 in Psychologically Minded
Why do people become dependent on drugs that are no more effective than sugar pills?

The Missing Link Between Psychology and Biology

By Warren W Tryon Ph.D. on February 10, 2015 in The Missing Link
How does psychology influence biology? How does biology influence psychology? Read on to find an answer.

Is Yoga Really Good for Your Health?

The many benefits of yoga today.

Irrelationship's Performer—Human Antidepressants

The song-and-dance routine of the "Performer" is driven by the need to distance himself from his own anxiety and pain by taking care of his primary caregiver (usually a parent). He will often develop into the do-gooder, caretaker, rescuer or hero, but those are roles cultivated from childhood, usually emerging from a distinct relational—or irrelational—pattern.

Treating Parents Helps Kids

By David Rettew M.D. on February 04, 2015 in ABCs of Child Psychiatry
There is mounting evidence that mental health problems can run in families and that treating parents can improve child behavior. Putting this knowledge into practice, however, has been slow.

The Nation Seems Sadder...and How We Might Better Cope

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 04, 2015 in How To Do Life
Many factors in modern life are making happiness more elusive.

Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 03, 2015 in How To Do Life
How to use a light box for seasonal depression.

The Surprising Psychology of the Common Cold

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on February 02, 2015 in Urban Survival
What is the connection between depression, your immune system, and inflammation? When you are physically ill, why can it feel very similar to depression? Recent studies explain why when you come down the flu, it can also feel like you caught the winter blues.

Herbal Aphrodisiacs Excite More Than the Imagination

By Michael Castleman M.A. on February 01, 2015 in All About Sex
Do traditional herbal aphrodisiacs work? Quite possibly yes.

Potential of Psilocybin in Mental Health Therapy

Over the past 50 years, tens of millions of people have used entheogens, yet there just is not much scientific evidence on either positive or negative long-term effects of these substances. The classical psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, etc.) are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive.

Starting Antidepressants? About the Weight Gain

After the hectics of the holiday season and the reality of a New Year setting in, many become depressed and turn to a physician for help. Must the proposed cure cause a physical overexpansion?

Premature Ejaculation: Causes and 10 Tips for Treatment

By Lisa Thomas LMFT on January 15, 2015 in Save Your Sex Life
While it was once thought to be only psychological, doctors now know premature ejaculation is more complicated.