The Psychology of Social Networking

Expanding your social network beyond your familiar circle of friends can have surprising benefits. It's those weak ties that bring fresh ideas and unexpected opportunities: a job or an apartment or a mate. The Internet is providing new tools for cultivating and capitalizing on those networks; someone you've never met in person could change your life.

Recent Posts on Social Networking

Six Tips to Guide You in Sharing Your Feelings

We say that people have “no filter” when they let everyone know exactly what they’re thinking at any given moment. Although self-disclosure can promote intimacy, there are times when discretion trumps honesty in order to preserve your relationships. These 6 tips will help you develop that perfect filter.

A Social Network for Depression

It's become more common to question the good of technology we use every day. Are we glued to our devices to the detriment of our real-life relationships? Does our scrolling through Facebook help us feel more connected, or feel worse about our own lives?

Feeling Lonely Sometimes….

You may have 1000 friends on Facebook and still feel lonely

Do You Have the Personality of a Neanderthal?

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Almost all of us have some Neanderthal in us. What can that tell us about how these ancient cousins of ours thought?

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
Campaigns to stamp out workplace gossip overlook the fact that gossip is part of who we are and an essential part of what makes work groups function as well as they do. It is more productive to think of gossip as a social skill rather than as a character flaw, because it is only when we do not do it well that we get into trouble.

Are Babies Contagious?

We commonly consider fertility outcomes to be idiosyncratic or accidental. But parenthood spreads through social networks, passing between siblings, friends, and co-workers. Why might the baby bug be so contagious and how do prospective parents catch it?

Why Social Media Will Dominate the 2016 Campaigns

We should expect all candidates to be investing heavily in social media. Why? Because social media isn’t just the NEW way to campaign; it’s THE way to campaign these days. Here are four reasons why.

The Perfect Storm: Twitter, Marijuana and the Teen Brain

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Singletons
Young Twitter users favor marijuana. Teen Twitter chatter about “pot” is high and influential for the risk-prone teenage brain. Twitter, marijuana and the developing teenage brain create the potential for a perfect storm.

7 Research-Based Reasons Internet Dating Doesn't Work

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Love, Digitally
Be wary of online chat Online dating is not a quick fix We make bad decisions in online dating

Four Ways that Online Harassment Can Be Upsetting for Youth

By Michele Ybarra MPH, Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Connected
What factors make some incidences of online harassment more upsetting to youth than others? While most Internet-using youth do not get harassed online, a fraction of youth harassed online are upset by the experience. Knowing what to look for can help us assist youth in need.

Technology May Be Ruining Your Ability to Read Emotions

Research shows how our digital world may be taking a toll on our emotional intelligence.

Please Let Me Act out on My Sugar Addiction in Peace

By Anna David on April 21, 2015 in After Party Chat
Those who consider themselves sugar addicts but then quit never tire of lecturing other sugar consumers about the dangers of that white powder. Why can't they just let us leave us alone with our cookies?

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Language in the Mind
What accounts for the hullabaloo surrounding the publication of The Language Myth. Is Chomskyan linguistics a form of intellectual fundamentalism? And is language science in the throes of a paradigm shift? It's certainly beginning to look that way!

My Student Wants a Romantic Relationship

Romance, teachers, and students don't mix.

Congress Should Declare That Mice Are Animals - Now!

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Animals and Us
In 2002, Congress declared that mice and rats and birds are not animals. A new study by PETA shows why it's time to change Federal animal protection statutes.

Why I Can't..... or Why Can't I?

Our beliefs and thoughts impact our lives more than any relationship.It would be wise to evaluate how we came to them and whether they truly serve us.

Subliminal Messages Can Fortify Inner Strength

Subliminal messages have the power to fortify your inner strength and self-confidence on and off the court.

I'm Having An Impossible Time With A Break-Up

Breaking Up in The Age of Social Media

"Burn Book": An App for Bullying

For those over 30, or without teenage children, the term “Burn Book” may have no meaning. 0thers will recognize it as the iconic Treasury of Nastiness from the movie Mean Girls. Now it has become an app—one that enables anonymous bullying in specific, selected communities:

Will You Be Openly Secular?

By David Niose on April 19, 2015 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Openly Secular Day aims to encourage nonbelievers to be open about their personal secularity.

Motor Activity Improves Working Memory in Children with ADHD

A new study suggests that a majority of students with ADHD could perform better on classroom work, tests, and homework if they were allowed to sit on activity balls or exercise bikes while learning.

A serialistion of my book “Cancer Is My Teacher” – Part 1

By Lucy O'Donnell on April 18, 2015 in Cancer Is a Teacher
Do you ever have a niggling feeling that something isn't right medically? Are you chronically tired for no reason? Has your Doctor often ignored these complaints and put it down to the stress of modern day living? Well, if this resonates with you, then read on. You could save your life.

When Your Personal, Private Choices Enrage Others

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in Living Single
Why do perfect strangers react to some of our most personal choices with anger and attempts to stigmatize us for them? "Otherhood" author Melanie Notkin, historian Elaine Tyler May, environmentalist Bill McKibben, "Childless by Choice" project director Laura S. Scott, and I share our thoughts about the matter.

Why Do Rich Kids Have Higher Standardized Test Scores?

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University recently reported that the academic “achievement gap” on standardized tests between lower-income and higher-income children is reflected in brain anatomy.

What We Choose to Believe - The Power of Belief

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
Why are we more tolerant of our own fallibility than that of machines that operate on probabilities (algorithms)? What does this say about our confidence in science and scientific evidence? Does the entrepreneurial mindset offer a different perspective on how we learn and grow?

What Your Facebook Use Reveals About Your Personality

Research shows the way you interact on social media says a lot about your personality and your self-esteem.

Alpha Brain Waves Boost Creativity and Reduce Depression

Neuroscientists have discovered that increasing alpha brain waves through electrical stimulation or mindfulness can boost creativity and minimize depression.

The Shocking Truth of Gadget Use

With every two out of three Americans owning a smartphone, our digital diet has expanded exponentially. The average American spends 11 hours with electronic gadgets every day.

Cyberbullying? There’s an App for That

In the 2004 teen comedy “Mean Girls,” a central plot point is a notebook filled with vicious rumors and gossip — the “Burn Book,” it is called. Now the concept has been taken into the social media age with the “Burnbook” app.