The Psychology of Social Networking

Expanding your social network beyond your familiar circle of friends can have surprising benefits. It's those weak ties that bring fresh ideas and unexpected opportunities: a job or an apartment or a mate. The Internet is providing new tools for cultivating and capitalizing on those networks; someone you've never met in person could change your life.

Recent Posts on Social Networking

The Trouble With Facebook

How To Use Facebook

13 Steps to Better Relationships...And Peace of Mind

By Meg Selig on July 28, 2015 in Changepower
You can use mindfulness techniques to create a more peaceful mind. But good social relationships may be just as important.

How Are You Portraying Yourself When Using Social Media?

By Gregg McBride on July 25, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
When did vitriol become a national pastime and filling our social media feeds with hatred become de rigeur? Has initially greeting someone we don't understand (or even that we don't agree with) with kindness become a thing of the past?

The Loneliness of Social Media, Part Two

Social media is not always very social. Understanding why not can help us understand what is lacking in our lives.

Better Than Chocolate

By Elias Aboujaoude M.D. on July 24, 2015 in Compulsive Acts
A new parent-child reward-punishment dynamic centered on technology.

What Matters More? Size or Quality of Your Social Network

What's more important for your health, happiness, and well-being—the quantity or quality of your social network?

The Loneliness of Social Media: Part One

You may have seen "the baby whisperer" photo that went viral. What it teaches us about life and loneliness in the digital age is fascinating.

Is Social Media Harmful to Relationships? The Debate

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in Love, Digitally
Do you argue with your partner as a result of Facebook use?

17 Minutes a Day?

How many minutes is too many minutes to spend focused on your cellphone?

Screening Out Screen Time

We've become addicted to our screens, obsessively checking email, chomping at the Twitter feed, and buried in Facebook. The disquiet many of us feel turns to downright worry when we see our children growing up screen-saturated. Research suggests this may have serious consequences for development.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.

When Dating, Confidence Will Get You Far (But Only So Far)

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 14, 2015 in Social Instincts
Implications for you, and your online dating profile.

Facebook-Self vs. True-Self: Presenting Contrived Happiness

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on July 10, 2015 in Screen Time
The need to have the false-self visible on a digital platform in an unusual trend in parents that has taken shape over the last several years.

Let's Start a Community of Single People

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 09, 2015 in Living Single
Many single people (and singles activists) want to be in touch with other single people who like their single lives. Reporters are often looking for singles to interview. Professionals working with singles want enlightened resources. Let's create a community of single people that's not about dating.

Top Tips for a Digital Detox

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on July 09, 2015 in In Excess
Digital detox refers to refraining from using electronic devices such as smartphones or computers. This article provides some tips on how to cut down on technology use, even if it’s just for the weekend or a holiday.

Are Smartphones at the Playground a Dumb Idea?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on July 08, 2015 in Singletons
Texting, snapping photos, checking email—smartphones at the playground are as ubiquitous as strollers these days. But a new study finds cell phone use leaves parents and caregivers far more distracted than they realize or want to be. Should you be worried?

What Can You Learn About People from Facebook?

As anyone who uses Facebook knows, different people post updates about different things: Your high school friend sharing photos of her kids, your colleague opining on politics, your friend posting funny animal videos. But what drives people to post what they do? A new study examines how our personality relates to the type of content we present on Facebook.

4 Tips for Dealing with Unsolicited Health Advice

Despite our attempts to be honest with family and friends about not wanting advice, some may continue to give it. This calls for self-protection in the form of self-compassion. We can gently remind ourselves what a burden it is to add to our ongoing pain and illness the work of having to access how to skillfully deal with what others are telling us to do about our health.

Why We're So Hung Up About Facebook Stalking

By Lisa A. Phillips on July 01, 2015 in Unrequited
Your best friend tells you to “stop stalking” your ex on Facebook. You’ve probably told yourself the same thing. Even if what you're doing isn't "real" stalking, it's still not a good idea.

5 'Flaws' That Just Make You More Lovable

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in In Love and War
You may think that people love you despite your flaws, not because of them. But some of the traits that you see as flaws may be more attractive than you realize.

Five Tips to Get More Clients When Networking

We all get a bit nervous when networking. Learn 5 must have tips to expand your client base when networking from media coach Gina Rubinstein.

Facebook Rainbows

Rainbow colored Facebook images could help in some way to alter views towards homosexuality. At the very least, it shows support for a group of individuals who have been marginalized and made to feel less than for far too long. And I can imagine that that - even in such a small gesture as a colored profile pic- feels incredible.

The Truth Behind Your Rainbow Profile Picture

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on June 29, 2015 in Friendship 2.0
In a spontaneous and beautiful display of support, many people rainbow-tinted their profile pics to celebrate marriage equality. What many did not know was how much cold, hard data analysis goes on about their decision to do so.

How to Learn to Love Networking

We all want to connect at a deep level. The only question is, how do you find the magical portal to the deep stuff?

Can Subliminal Messages Create Feelings of Love and Lust?

Can a sexy picture in the background or a well-chosen romantic word, trigger automatic feelings of love and desire? Could the right situation or association make you seem more attractive, sexy, or alluring to a potential lover? See what the research has to say here...

The Non-Committal RSVP

Are you having trouble getting people to commit to showing up? I’m impressed with the two convicted convicts who escaped from a NY prison. I know they are horrible and dangerous. Still, I admire their ability to get a plan together and stick with it. Obviously, they are not from LA.

Your Old School-Days Bully Wants to Friend You

On the one hand, you can finally have your voice heard, even dish back a moment of—pain? Doubt? Regret? Humility? (while reminding him or her what a little shit s/he was). On the other hand, what’s the point? Reminding them of their cruelties may feel good, in the moment, but after hitting “Send” are you really able to move on? What is it you want?

Social Media in a Successful Psychotherapy Practice

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on June 24, 2015 in Meaningful You
Learning how to navigate the new terrain of social media in a professional manner is integral to the success of a psychotherapy practice.

Headquarters? What Headquarters? Behind Pixar's Inside Out

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on June 22, 2015 in The Pacific Heart
Inside Out is a fantastic movie, highlighting the inner life of a girl, with plenty of positive female role models in the form of emotions. Sadness is the unlikely hero. We learn a lot about childhood vulnerability, emotional regulation, and adaptation. But emotional regulation, and the idea of a “Headquarters” in our mind, bear a closer look.