What Is Social Learning Theory?

Social learning theory combines cognitive learning theory (which posits that learning is influenced by psychological factors) and behavioral learning theory (which assumes that learning is based on responses to environmental stimuli). Psychologist Albert Bandura integrated these two theories and came up with four requirements for learning: observation (environmental), retention (cognitive), reproduction (cognitive), and motivation (both). This integrative approach to learning was called social learning theory. 

One of Bandura's most famous experiments is the famous bobo doll experiment. Children observed as adults modeled either violent or passive behavior towards the doll, and this observation was found to influence the manner in which the children subsequently interacted with the dolls. Children who observed violent behavior behaved violently toward the doll and vice versa.

Recent posts on Social Learning Theory

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By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on August 17, 2017 in Screen Time
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"Signage 55 speed limit"/David Lofink/CC BY 2.0

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By Barb Cohen on July 27, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
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By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 20, 2017 in Ambigamy
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By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on May 03, 2017 in Play in Mind
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Gender-Based Interruption and the Supreme Court

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Does Watching Porn Promote Submissiveness in Women?

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What Bias Looks Like for Me

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 03, 2017 in Minority Report
Do you feel warmly or coldly towards white people? How about Black people? Foreigners? Muslims? Christians? As you can see, there will always be those we feel more comfortable.

The Head-in-the-Sand President

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 29, 2017 in The Green Mind
Ignorance may be bliss, but only for a moment. When Trump ignores or deletes climate data, he imperils the planet and all of us.

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How Temperament Impacts Entrepreneurship

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Social Learning: Eyes Provide a Window Into Primate Minds

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on January 25, 2017 in Animal Emotions
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Normalizing Drug Use

By Stanton Peele on January 17, 2017 in Addiction in Society
We have entered an era in which drug use is widespread and at the same it is viewed as unmanageable and uncontrollable. We need instead to accept and to regulate it.

113 Chinese "Shame" Terms

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on January 14, 2017 in Minority Report
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The Asian Scarlet Letter

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on January 08, 2017 in Minority Report
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Of Brothers and Dolls, or How Princess Leia Saved My Life

By Mark O'Connell L.C.S.W.- R. on December 29, 2016 in Quite Queerly
We can encourage our children to play, and to express themselves fully, without having to blame others when they don't get their way.

Why Women Spend So Much Effort on Their Appearance

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on December 22, 2016 in The Human Beast
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5 Things Adults Unlearn

By Emily S. Beitiks on December 21, 2016 in The Age of Biotech
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New Research Reveals Neural Roots of Social Anxiety

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Female Power And Why We Need It So Badly

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Stealth Voters Facilitate Trump´s Poll Vault to Victory

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 10, 2016 in Why Bad Looks Good
How could polls be so wrong? Momentum drove math. Undercover Trump voters were quiet about their political views, and quietly cast their votes this week—for the Donald.