What Is Sensation-Seeking?

Sensation-seeking, also called excitement-seeking, is the tendency to pursue sensory pleasure and excitement. It's the trait of people who go after novelty, complexity, and intense sensations, who love experience for its own sake, and who may take risks in the pursuit of such experience. Sensation seekers are "easily bored without high levels of stimulation," explains psychologist Sam Gosling. "They love bright lights and hustle and bustle and like to take risks and seek thrills."  

Recent posts on Sensation-Seeking

K. Ramsland

Day Pass for a Psychopath?

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on November 20, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Trusting a known killer with a preference for children to be on his own might be a mistake.

Why Do We Love (and Hate) Feeling Scared?

By Rob Henderson on October 30, 2017 in After Service
Why do we love feeling afraid, but also hate it? The paradox is simpler than you think.

Open Your Mind: Merging Psychedelic Therapy with Sex Therapy

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on October 24, 2017 in Standard Deviations
Psychotherapist reveals current advances in psychedelic research and sex therapy.

Unraveling the Teenage Mind

Adolescence can be a mystifying time for everyone. This new book can help.

Senseless Killing and the Need to Know Why

By Carrie Barron M.D. on October 04, 2017 in The Creativity Cure
Thoughts and research regarding the motivation for cruel, senseless crimes.

Big Shot

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on October 04, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
A wealthy gambler uses an arsenal and a casino hotel to kill 58 concert-goers and himself, wounding hundreds. His actions can help us understand what it means to be human.

Born To Be Wild: Why Teens Take Risks, and How We Can Help

What happened to that wonderful, even angelic child we knew before he or she turned teen? Did we do something wrong…
K. Ramsland

I Wanna Be a Serial Killer #3

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on September 24, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Some people believe that if they follow the example of an infamous serial killer, their aspirations guarantee success.

A Psychology of Rescue

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on September 08, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
A nurse gave patients lethal injections so he could dazzle colleagues by bringing the victims back to life. He may have been driven by "heroic rescue," one of our core motives.
K. Ramsland

Games Killers Play

A recent news report about coded letters from serial killer Ian Brady raises hope, but it might be just part of the games these offenders like to play.

Craving More Meaningful Trips?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on July 12, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Guest blogger and constant traveler Steven Barber reviews an unusual travel guide, one that helps you figure yourself out in order to plan and take better trips.

The Opioid Crisis

The latest information suggests the crisis may get worse before it gets better.
Praeger

Will This Angel of Death be Released?

With the approaching release of a suspected healthcare serial killer in Texas, old cases are being reexamined for possible new evidence against her.
K. Ramsland

Dangerous Things Kids Do

Adolescents seek out novelty and excitement as they explore their sense of identity, which leaves them vulnerable to dangerous trends and people.

Out of the Shadows: Shining Light on the Vampire Community

New research on modern day vampires sheds light on this misunderstood community.

Risky Business—Your Grandparents, Risk-taking and Falls

By Toby Ellmers on May 08, 2017 in Aging Brain, Aging Body
Can risk-taking explain the link between older age and increased falls? New research suggests so.

The Arguer

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 04, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story.

Killing Lions and Wooing Hearts

By David F Lancy Ph.D. on May 02, 2017 in Benign Neglect
Why do adolescent males engage in risky behavior and what can be done about it?

13 Reasons Why Men Cheat

Hey guys! Cheating is not the only option.
K. Ramsland

Erotica for Serial Killers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 10, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Despite debates over whether salacious imagery causes people to become violent, in some cases, it is clearly influential.

How to Avoid "Daring" Behavior

Unlike the innocent childhood game, playing "Truth or Dare" with sexual predators is a lose-lose proposition. Read this before accepting a challenge you will later regret.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month: Don't Play Truth or Dare

Playing "Truth or Dare," you either disclose personal information, or engage in reckless behavior you usually regret. Sexual predators target individuals who are willing to play.

Turning a Vice Into a Virtue Through Healthy Self-Soothing

There is nothing wrong with needing a little self-soothing so long as it is not detrimental to your health.

Rediscovering a Zest for Life

By John Sean Doyle on March 27, 2017 in Luminous Things
When we seek the strange or exotic that is just outside our door, we can rediscover who we really are and begin to live our lives more passionately.
K. Ramsland

The G-Man and the Serial Killer

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 25, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Writer who set out to learn the identity of Eliot Ness's secret suspect for Cleveland's Mad Butcher fictionalizes the tale.

What Happened to Risk-Taking in Science?

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in Curious?
Great strides have been made in psychology. No longer is it acceptable to run an experiment with 30 college students. But here we take a closer look at the questions being asked...
Permission: R. Parker

Close Call With a Killer

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on February 11, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
A crime historian pens an illustrated ebook about the cruel serial killer he once had encountered.

50 Shades Happier? The Truth About BDSM Participants

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on February 03, 2017 in Standard Deviations
With the upcoming release of "Fifty Shades Darker," groundbreaking new research challenges stereotypes about BDSM participants portrayed in the "Fifty Shades" trilogy.

7 Truths If Someone You Love Is Addicted

Addiction can be overwhelming, especially to those on the outside looking in. Knowing what you’re dealing with helps.

Do Extraverts Have More Children?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on January 24, 2017 in The Human Beast
Extraverts are more vulnerable to boredom. In the evolutionary past, they likely relieved the boredom by having affairs. Did this improve their reproductive success?