What Is Sensation-Seeking?

Sensation-seeking, also called excitement-seeking, is the tendency to pursue sensory pleasure and excitement. It's the trait of people who go after novelty, complexity, and intense sensations, who love experience for its own sake, and who may take risks in the pursuit of such experience. Sensation seekers are "easily bored without high levels of stimulation," explains psychologist Sam Gosling. "They love bright lights and hustle and bustle and like to take risks and seek thrills."  

Recent posts on Sensation-Seeking

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By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 10, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Despite debates over whether salacious imagery causes people to become violent, in some cases, it is clearly influential.

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By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in Curious?
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Permission: R. Parker

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Fountain pen, labeled for reuse, Pixabay

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AASECT, the national sex therapy certifying organization releases a groundbreaking position statement about the sex addiction model.
James Bond Wikia

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By Christopher Bergland on October 20, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
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Mugshot: public domain

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