Understanding Self-Harm

Self-harm is the deliberate infliction of damage to your own body and includes cutting, burning, and other forms of injury. While cutting can look like attempted suicide, it's often not; most people who mutilate themselves do it as a way to regulate mood. People who hurt themselves in this way may be motivated by a need to distract themselves from inner turmoil or to quickly release anxiety that builds due to an inability to express intense emotions.

Recent posts on Self-Harm

"Daddy, Can I Die and Make the Pain Stop?"

By Kevin D. Arnold Ph.D., ABPP on September 22, 2016 in The Older Dad
Some young children think about suicide, but adults often never hear the cry for help.
Pixabay, labeled for reuse

Why the Sex Addiction Model Is Not a Humanistic Approach

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Plenty of evidence suggests that harm reduction psychotherapy provides a more humanistic alternative to sex addiction treatment.

The #1 Predictor of Relationship Success No One Talks About

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Feeling It
How You Relate To Yourself Predicts Your Relationship Success With Others

The Terrorist Attacks of September 11 as Psychological Toxin

By Monica N. Starkman M.D. on September 11, 2016 in On Call
…and their long-lasting and serious side-effects.

Semicolon Punctuates Mental Health Awareness

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on September 07, 2016 in Talking About Trauma
This global non-profit movement is dedicated to providing support for those struggling with mental illness, suicide, addiction, and self-injury.

Equine Tourette’s Syndrome

By Nicholas Dodman on September 04, 2016 in Dog Days
Can horses have Tourette's Sydrome? This author belives they can.

Cognitive Rigidity: The 8-Ball From Hell

Cognitive Rigidity (difficulty changing mental sets) is a core feature of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and is commonly associated with a suite of challenging traits.

Selecting a President

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on July 12, 2016 in A Sideways View
How would you do a job analysis of the office of the President? What traits are basic requirements? What should you look for regarding dark-side traits that you don't want?
https://snippetstudios.com/2014/02/13/netflix-valentines-day/

5 Reasons Singles Should Stop Worrying

By Deborah Carr Ph.D. on June 04, 2016 in Bouncing Back
Are you worried about being single forever? Here are five reasons not to fret.
Stock photo, publicdomainpictures.net

Yes, It Is Time to Finally Move on From Sex Addiction

A new clinical model for the treatment of out of control sexual behavior appears to suggest that the sex addiction model is approaching its expiration date.

The Internet Suicide Minefield

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on April 27, 2016 in Media Spotlight
What makes some young people vulnerable to pro-suicide messages online? A new research study provides answers.

Why Do So Many Superstars Self-Destruct Like Supernovas?

Why has superstardom caused so many musical icons of the 1980s to die prematurely? This blog post explores the underbelly of fame and the quest for "Holy Grail" peak experiences.

What's Worse for Your Brain Than a Concussion?

By Meg Selig on April 12, 2016 in Changepower
Parents now know the possible harms from concussions. But this other common activity could also damage the brains of both young and old—yet it is widely accepted as "normal."

Three Steps To Getting Out of a Toxic Relationship

Toxic relationships destroy lives. Here are three empowering ways to move on.

Suffocation Roulette And Childhood Choking Games

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on March 23, 2016 in In Excess
The ‘choking game’ (known as the ‘fainting game’ and ‘suffocation roulette’) is an example of self-asphyxial risk-taking behaviour. But how prevalent is it and what do we know?

Guess What? Smoking Cigarettes Is Also Bad for Your Car

People who smoke in their cars end up polluting the interiors in ways that can't be cleaned or ventilated.

There’s No Such Thing as (Real) Self-Sabotage

By Adi Jaffe Ph.D. on March 21, 2016 in All About Addiction
When we talk about self-sabotage, we fool ourselves into thinking that some people purposefully disrupt their success in life. But that's just not true.

Taming Tween Texting and Tech Troubles

Tween technology usage is booming unlike any other generation. Such young users can run into many dangers. Read on for tips on taming their usage.

Beyond Columbine - A Conversation With Sue Klebold

I asked Sue Klebold: 1. Tell me about Dylan 2. When you think of "If only" what comes to mind 3. When you think of stopping school violence, "What if..."

Transhumanism Movement Wants to Eliminate Existential Risk

By Zoltan Istvan on March 12, 2016 in The Transhumanist Philosopher
As a 2016 US Presidential candidate, it amazes me that more attention is not dedicated to overcoming existential risk by the very thing humans are good at: innovating.

The Brain's Delicate Chemistry

What do sex addiction, self-harm and runner’s high all have in common? All three involve chemicals designed to help us survive.

Saving Lives at Suicide Hotspots

Many iconic landmarks are also suicide hotspots. Do on-site prevention efforts really work or do they just spoil the view and lead people to go elsewhere. A new study weighs in.

4 Truths About Power in Relationships (Including Yours)

Relationship power is not just a general idea, it can relate to specific aspects of your partnership.

The Metaphors of Eating Disorders

Learn about, and how to effectively treat, these life threatening symptoms that affect millions of people all over.

What Kind of Person is Besties With a Narcissist?

By Garth Sundem on February 23, 2016 in Brain Trust
It may not be that narcissists seek versions of themselves, but that they can't help but be stuck with themselves.

Ups and Downs

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 10, 2016 in How To Do Life
A very short story about a person with bipolar and his wife.

Risky Business: The Psychology of Facing Danger

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on January 27, 2016 in The Dolphin Divide
How we arrive at the willingness to take calculated risks. Specific components of mental conditioning are often required to face moments of grave danger.

Can You Be 'Addicted' to Water?

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on January 20, 2016 in In Excess
There are various accounts of individuals being aquaholics ("addicted to water). This article examines the literature on psychogenic polydipsia, hyponatraemia, and ‘aquaholism'.

Overcoming BPD - 9 New Years Resolutions

By Blaise Aguirre M.D. on January 18, 2016 in On the Borderline
In dealing with the 9 symptoms of BPD, a regular mindfulness practice can make a lasting impact. Here is a specific practice to target self-destructive thoughts and behaviors.

Teens and Self-Injurious Behaviors

Find out why teenagers self-injure and the warning signs to look for.