All About Resilience

Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to rise from the ashes. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that make someone resilient, among them a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback. Even after misfortune, resilient people are blessed with such an outlook that they are able to change course and soldier on.

Recent Posts on Resilience

When Going “Home” Makes You Crazy or Depressed

By Carrie Barron M.D. on November 28, 2015 The Creativity Cure
Returning to the family home is a taxing experience for many people. Here are some thoughts about how to deal with it.

Is Failure the New Black in Parenting?

By Richard Rende Ph.D. on November 28, 2015 Inside Parenting
Telling parents to back off and let their kids fail may sound very hip, but there's a hitch in the daily experience of being a kid. It's called a grade.

Building Cognitive Reserve

It's never too late to build cognitive reserve

5 Ways Mentally Strong People Overcome Rejection

Learning how to bounce back after rejection could be the key to reaching your greatest potential.

A Quick and Easy Guide to Surviving the Holidays

No matter how functional your family is you are guaranteed to be disappointed by the holidays in some way, and also to disappoint. But you can get ahead of all this with my help; forewarned is forearmed. Here are some easy do's and dont's to help you navigate through the Helliday minefields and to even possibly have a good time.

Going Home for the Holidays — Tragedy or Comedy?

If a family’s drama can’t be handled or the dysfunction runs too deep or lies too close to the surface, keeping your distance may be the only choice. In other cases, do what you can to show how well you’ve turned out — because of, or in spite of, the family that raised you.

Causes of Students’ Emotional Fragility: Five Perspectives

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on November 25, 2015 Freedom to Learn
The high and apparently increasing rates of emotional disorders and problems of everyday living among college students have generated great concern on campuses throughout the nation. Here I present a sample of views expressed by K–12 teachers, professors, employers, parents, and students about the sources of students’ emotional and coping difficulties.

The Rise and Rapid Reduction of 'Rowdy' Ronda Rousey

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on November 24, 2015 Black Belt Brain
Even though we enjoy watching the best athletes demonstrate their skills, we also like to see skillful, but super-confident athletes get beaten. Is it because we cannot identify with them?

Why Resilient Leaders Need To Embrace Gratitude

Does gratitude play a role in resilient leadership? A growing body of research offers surprising insights.

The End of Rural Communities: Why Young People Leave

Research shows that young people prefer to remain in their rural communities if they have access to education and employment opportunities. It will take governments and the private sector to build resilient rural spaces that stop out-migration.

3 Things to Do When You're Not Sure About Your Relationship

Ambivalence is common in long-term relationships because it’s easy to drift apart over the years, but you stay because leaving is too complicated. And yet ambivalence is a stressful place to park. Is your marriage really worth saving? Here are some reasons to set yourself free from indecision and tips for moving toward a more peaceful, fulfilling existence.

7 Questions to Get You Through Any Challenge

If stress is a given, how can you build your resilience to it? How can you evaluate the challenge in a flexible and accurate way? Whether you’re dealing with a minor adversity or going through a big life crisis, these seven questions will give you some perspective and build your resilience.

12 Easy Ways to Shrink Annoying Problems Down to Size

By Meg Selig on November 20, 2015 Changepower
Got a problem? Shrink it! These 12 techniques will relieve stress by shrinking annoying problems down to a more manageable size.

Gift Giving as a Remedy for the Holiday Blues

By Steven Schlozman M.D. on November 20, 2015 Grand Rounds
The winter holidays are descending and it fills many of us with dread. Want to know a secret? Giving feels better than receiving. It's not just a cliche—it's science.

How to Live With Terrorism: Empowering Bystanders

By Renee Garfinkel Ph.D. on November 20, 2015 Time Out
What can we learn from a week of terror in Paris, Marseilles, Tel Aviv, Beirut and Yolo, Nigeria?

Building Core Value Narratives

When personal narratives persist over time, they develop a support structure of highly reinforced habits.

RID Yourself of Psychological Distress

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 In Control
When correcting any problem, the way in which the trouble is understood will have a large bearing on how effective and efficient the remediation efforts are.

An Epidemic of Suicides

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 Hidden Motives
Why are suicide rates rising so rapidly in the U.S.?

Parental Pressure Takes a Toll on Young Athletes

Emphasizing whether a child wins or loses in a sport harms self-esteem.

Be Thankful

Have you hugged yourself yet today?

Student Protests and Omnipotent Control

By Carrie Barron M.D. on November 19, 2015 The Creativity Cure
College student protests, anger, power and tearing down the holding environment.

9 Mantras That Keep You Mentally Strong During Tough Times

The things you tell yourself during tough times play a major role in your ability to overcome hardship.

5 Tips to Help Children Cope with Threats of Terrorism

Our country has constantly been on alert of terror threats and many families have to find the best way to talk with their children about potential crisis.

Why Did ISIS Do It?

By Clark McCauley Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 Friction
ISIS has a strategy. Our reaction to Paris is part of it.

Book Review: Restoring Resilience

An illuminating new book shares strategies for helping your clients regain their resilience.

How to Feel Safe When Bad Things Happen

After devastating national or international tragedies, we all find ourselves living in a world that is materially the same but psychologically altered. Finding a way to feel safe is essential to living well and thriving. Follow these four steps to help you and your family feel secure in times of tragedy.

How Depression Prepared Me For A Death In The Family

By Tom Wootton on November 17, 2015 Bipolar Advantage
If I did not understand how to function during depression or, worse yet, still clung to the notion that it is not possible, I would have been a burden to my family instead of an asset. Most people fear they will break down and become a burden on those around them or that their bipolar loved ones will break down and add to the already difficult situation.

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 The Power of Prime
Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

Who Should Help Pay for Yoga?

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on November 17, 2015 Urban Survival
Here are four reasons why health insurers should pay attention to yoga programs and help us pay for them.

The Curious Grit of Loni Love

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 Brick by Brick
Loni Love shares her inspirational story of overcoming barriers to reach success.