All About Resilience

Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to rise from the ashes. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that make someone resilient, among them a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback. Even after misfortune, resilient people are blessed with such an outlook that they are able to change course and soldier on.

Recent posts on Resilience

4 Ways to Stop Putting Your Joy on Hold

By Susan Biali M.D. on September 30, 2016 in Prescriptions for Life
Do you complain a lot about your life, or frequently wish that it could be different? Shift your perspective and discover how to enjoy your life now, no matter what's going on.

You CAN Stay Strong, Sane & Centered in Times of Stress

By Traci Stein Ph.D., MPH on September 30, 2016 in The Integrationist
These 7 tips can help you become more emotionally resilient in general and maintain perspective during times of strife

Staying Physically Active Promotes Self-Reliance as You Age

By Christopher Bergland on September 30, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Yale University reports that staying moderately physically active is key to maintaining mobility and a state of independence as people get older.

Self Care 101: You Can’t Pour From an Empty Cup

By Susan Biali M.D. on September 28, 2016 in Prescriptions for Life
If your life has felt too busy for a while, you're probably running on empty. Avoid the inevitable disaster by heeding warning signs in your body, before it's too late.

Stop Waiting for the Right Moment to Meditate

By Marty Babits on September 28, 2016 in The Middle Ground
Too frenetic to sit for meditation? There are alternatives. Here are some of the most useful action-oriented meditation practices.

Happy Birthday Albert Ellis PhD !

By Debbie Joffe Ellis on September 27, 2016 in Tried and True
Albert Ellis PhD - Pioneer, maverick - creator of unique wit and know-er of wisdom, changed the lives of millions through his innovative works, huge body of writings, and example.

Expressive Arts Therapies and Posttraumatic Growth

Arts expression and expressive arts therapies are changing personal narratives of posttraumatic stress to ones of posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic "possibility."

What to Do When You Feel Annoyed by Your Partner

By Deborah L. Davis Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Laugh, Cry, Live
When you’re feeling annoyed by your partner, what can you do in the moment that will make things better, not worse? Here are 5 winning tips for soothing the flames of indignation.

9 Things Highly Sensitive People Do

Studies estimate 15 to 20 percent of the population meet the criteria for being highly sensitive people. Here are a few telltale signs you might be one of them.

Will Your Gamer Survive College?

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on September 26, 2016 in Mental Wealth
If you're concerned about your son's video game habits spinning out of control when he goes to college, you're right to be worried—but here's what parents can do.

The Blessings and Challenges of Having “A Protector’s Brain”

We must move young people beyond blaming themselves for having "an anger problem." Shifting their identity towards having "a protector's brain" is a start.
Ken Ginsburg

I Do Not Have an “Empty Nest,” My Children Are “In Flight”

Are you in mourning because your child is growing up? Are you wondering what life looks like after your teen leaves home? Let's celebrate both independence and interdependence.

Marrow: A Love Story: Sitting Down With Elizabeth Lesser

By Mark Matousek on September 23, 2016 in Ethical Wisdom
Author Elizabeth Lesser, talks about her new book, Marrow: A Love Story. It's a sister's tale of becoming a donor and what it taught her about the meaning of love.

Trying to Explain the Inexplicable

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in What the Luck?
We are tempted to look for psychological explanations for successes and failures, when the more convincing explanation is simply that people get lucky—and luck is fleeting.

The Importance of Family Dinnertime: Part One

By Robyn Fivush Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in The Stories of Our Lives
Families that eat dinner together have adolescents who do better, and family storytelling is part of the reason why.

Is Your Partner Annoying the Crap Out of You?

By Deborah L. Davis Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in Laugh, Cry, Live
Petty annoyances are inevitable in any partnership, but you needn’t drive each other insane. Here are 5 approaches that can help you get off the train to Crazytown.
Public Domain, PIxabay

Infertility and Miscarriage: Emerging From the Shadows

By Monica N. Starkman M.D. on September 21, 2016 in On Call
Open, compassionate discussion of reproductive failure is necessary in order to combat the social stigma that surrounds it.

Small Bits of Bravery to Accomplish Anything

By Susan Harrow on September 21, 2016 in The Body Blog
Bravery comes in many forms. What if you can do one brave act a day, no matter how small to build your bravery?
By John Snape (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The Art and Science of Mistakes

To err is human, but...how human do we have to be?

8 Ways to Overcome a Blow to Your Ego

It’s tough to lose at something that matters to you, whether a race with hundreds of strangers or a bet with your best friend. These 8 tips will help you bounce back from defeat.

Three Keys to Healing Shame

To heal our shame, we need to be: truly seen, witnessed with compassion, and have our feelings and deepest truths believed.

Helping After Terrorist Attacks? Know Your Limits

By Jamie D. Aten Ph.D. on September 19, 2016 in To Heal and Carry On
Are you starting feeling overwhelmed and worn out from helping after the recent attacks? A little self-care can go a long way.

Shift the Sadness of Losing Summer

Our brain brain is good at scanning for negatives, but you can wire yourself to focus on positives.

Listen To Your Heart

By Gaby Pfeifer, Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Mind Growth
Our ability to listen to internal bodily signals, such as our heartbeat, is known as interoception. How does interoception contribute to our emotional experiences?

Tune Up Your Therapy with Healing Song and Support

By Lisa Aronson Fontes Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Invisible Chains
Feeling stuck or shy and lacking joy? Singing in a supportive group can help bring your groove back.

Understanding Shame: Symptoms and Prevention

Shame is insidious, corrupting our self-knowledge, inhibiting our self-love. What are shame's consequences? What can we do to prevent it's toxic bite?

This Simple Leadership Behavior Also Increases Resilience

By Madelyn Blair Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Resilient Leadership
Are you doing this simple behavior that grows your leadership and your resilience? Learn more in this final next-level leadership article.

Resilience: The Divorcées Secret Superpower

By Wendy Paris on September 13, 2016 in Splitopia
Resilient people make conscious choices every day to put aside time for practices that energize them, enliven them or strengthen them." Here's how.

Butterfly Professions: Handling the Ending Edge

Coping at an early age with the end of a career that's defined who you are--for athletes and dancers--offers challenges and solutions.

Showing the World Her Wabi-Sabi Humanizes Hillary Clinton

By Christopher Bergland on September 13, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Is it possible that having pneumonia could end up being a blessing in disguise for Hillary Clinton by making her seem more human and relatable?