All About Resilience

Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to rise from the ashes. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that make someone resilient, among them a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback. Even after misfortune, resilient people are blessed with such an outlook that they are able to change course and soldier on.

Recent posts on Resilience

Marital Infidelity: Existential Uncertainty in Spades

By Susan Rako M.D. on February 18, 2017 in More Light
"How can I ever trust my husband/wife again?"

A Teens Journey of Their Own

By The Resilience Regiment on February 17, 2017 in Voices in Recovery
The Resilience Regiment speaks with Paradigm Malibu

Seeing the Whole Picture

By The Resilience Regiment on February 17, 2017 in Voices in Recovery
The Resilience Regiment speaks to Evolve Treatment Centers

Dogs: Love, Rejection, Dominance, Training, and Breeding

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Dogs are in the news a lot and here's a summary of what's "hot." Dogs fall in love and suffer from rejection, dominance should not be used in training, and they're awfully smart.
Jens Maus

Brain on Fire

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 16, 2017 in Decisions Teens Make
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been called one of the “best known but least understood” mental health conditions. Why is it so well known?
Krystine I. Batcho

When Your Heart is Breaking

When you lose someone you love, it can feel like your heart is breaking. Attending to emotional suffering is as important as taking care of physical pain.

How to Make Your Relationships More Resilient

Developing high-quality relationships is critical to a happy, healthy and resilient life.

Rethinking the College Mental Health Crisis

By Kristen Lee Ed.D., LICSW on February 14, 2017 in Reset 24/7
Do bubble wrap and special snowflake myths distract us from the realities today's students face? A biopsychosocial lens can help us find ways to cultivate agility and resilience.

Divorce in Middle Age

The dissolution of a marriage is usually a major life stressor. Yet, it's up to you whether your new life is aimed toward fulfillment and growth or one of regret and stagnation.

Seeking Success and Patrolling Failure

By Rob Henderson on February 13, 2017 in After Service
What can sleeplessness, stress, and sexist attitudes tell us about how our minds work?

Are You Always Busier Than Everyone Else? Do You Want to Be?

Instead of enjoying our time, we learned to manage it. We pass the day checking off tasks from lists as is if having to prove to Life's Parking Attendant we were here legally.

Can We Really Have a Happy Valentine's Day This Year?

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Worry Wise
Even in a crisis, even in an emergency, we work in shifts. Some of us always need to be on love duty. We need to put the oxygen masks on our relationships first.

Women Who Stay Single or Get Divorced Are Healthiest

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on February 11, 2017 in Living Single
Women 50+ who got married got fatter, drank more, and had higher blood pressure than when they were single. Women who divorced got healthier than they were when they were married.
Damian Boeselager/Shutterstock

Hope and Hopelessness in Trump's America

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on February 09, 2017 in Supersurvivors
Not only does hopelessness feel bad, it’s associated with inaction, making it a recipe for disaster in a democracy. So how do those in the political opposition remain hopeful?

Failure to Launch: What do we (mom & dad) do now?

By Jeffery S. Smith M.D. on February 08, 2017 in Healing and Growing
Helen and Bill were at their wits end with their son, Josh, 22. What can parents do to help young people struggling with adult life?

Why You Need to Fire Your Inner Monday Morning Quarterback

By Kristen Lee Ed.D., LICSW on February 06, 2017 in Reset 24/7
Does your inner critic get the best of you? Your best move might be to fire your obnoxious voice of unreason, and rehire a more rational, compassionate guide.

A Life Lesson from LI

99 percent probability does not make it 100 percent definite. Don't give up!

Grief Is Another Word for Love

By Sophie Sabbage on February 06, 2017 in The Cancer Whisperer
Are you waiting for grief to bring closure? That's not its job.
Alessandra Pigni

Preventing Burnout in the New Era

By Alessandra Pigni on February 06, 2017 in The Idealist
How do you keep sane and avoid burnout while engaging in activism and social change? Here are the ABCs of burnout prevention in the new era.

Five Secrets to a Stress-Proof Brain

You may want to get rid of stress, but you can’t! But you can learn to accept your stress and transform the way you think about it so you can benefit from its positive aspects.
Maintien et Actualisation des Compétences de SST (MAC)

Do You Feel Victimized?

What to do when you're feeling a victim.

5 Essential Facts About Children and War

If we want to help children exposed to armed conflict, we would do well to heed the findings of recent studies.

Research Suggests How to Declutter the Mind

Do the same thoughts keep rummaging through your mind, and not in a productive way? New research shows how to mentally declutter these troubling distractions and feel better.
Used with permission: Worcester Telegram & Gazette November 18, 1995

Word Matters

Mind and body are connected; both hateful and compassionate speech affect our bodies, our immune and cardiovascular systems and our brains.

Life with a Mentally Ill Parent

By Mitch Prinstein Ph.D. on February 02, 2017 in The Modern Teen
A riveting new book chronicles one woman's experiences with a mentally-ill parent, and offers remarkable inspiration for coping as an adult

Acceptance: What Does It Mean?

Do you accept or tolerate your LGBT child? Lean the difference so you can resolve the conflict.

How Do You Deal With Disappointment?

Your choices make a difference.

Finding Purpose or Chasing Rainbows?

Chasing rainbows is not necessarily a bad thing nor is contemplating the meaning of your life a waste of time.

How The What-The-Hell Effect Impacts Your Willpower

The what-the-hell effect describes the cycle you feel when you indulge, regret what you’ve done, and then go back for more.

Self-Compassion, Growth Mindset, and the Benefits of Failure

By Christopher Bergland on January 30, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A groundswell of new research reaffirms the importance of believing that intelligence is never fixed, practicing self-compassion, and embracing the hidden benefits of failure.