All About Resilience

Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to rise from the ashes. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that make someone resilient, among them a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback. Even after misfortune, resilient people are blessed with such an outlook that they are able to change course and soldier on.

Recent Posts on Resilience

Declare Your Independence from That Which Shackles You

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 04, 2015 in How To Do Life
Is it finally time to start throwing off your chains?

Near Misses Are Motivating

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 03, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Modern slot machines are fascinating devices. Most of them are not mechanical, they are electronic. That means that you pull the lever (or press a button) and the machine draws a random number that determines whether you have won. After that, the machine displays a show on the screen that ultimately lets you see whether you won.

Can You Stay Married But Have Your Independence Too?

Perhaps the institution of marriage is failing society rather than all of those unhappily marrieds or divorcing men and women being the failures. Why not explore some new alternatives?

Depression Army™ Strong

I’m telling you that if I was able to talk about my depression, you can talk about yours. It feels good to finally drop the mask

Are You A Strengths-Based Parent?

When it comes to parenting your kids do you spend most of your time pointing out what they’re doing wrong or what they’re doing right? If you’re like most time poor parents the chances are you’re quicker at identifying the things your kids need to improve upon, but is this the best way to raise kids who are resilient and able to cope with stress?

5 Phrases Mentally Strong People Don't Say

If you find yourself saying any of these phrases, consider it a warning sign that you could be making a bad decision.

Bouncing Back From Getting Dumped in 3 Easy Steps

It’s normal to need to re-validate your potential as a lover and a partner, but remember that every relationship is not meant to last forever and that every new relationship is a new beginning that does not have to yield to the self-same ending.

Eight Ways to Move on From Failure & Disappointment

Failure and disappointment are an inevitable part of life, yet they can be challenging and difficult to deal with. Research shows that persistence and determination are just as or more important to success than natural talent. Here are 8 tools to help you get back out there and keep putting your best self forward.

Why Are People with Disabilities the Targets of Violence?

Why do offenders target people with disabilities? Are there links between types of disability and type of victimization? The Data Doctor answers a question from the aunt of a former student.

Coping with Adversity from "Inside Out"

This film effectively and hilariously shines a light on the inner workings of our emotional brains and why we struggle at times. Most powerfully, its metaphor of "Emotions at Your Central Control Panel" offers a useful way to reflect on our own feelings and how they can push us to react, sometimes to our disadvantage. Required viewing for anyone operating a human brain.

Treatment in the Balance

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Ronald D. Sager, M.D., of Balance Treatment Center

On the Horizon

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Burr Cook of Balboa Horizons

Anxiety and Overcoming Failure to Launch Syndrome

When overcoming debilitating anxiety in young adults, what matters most is not just an improvement according to a diagnostic manual (known as “syndromal improvement”) but also functional improvement. In essence: Has the young adult’s life improved in ways that he or she now has more hope, feels happier, and has a sense of real, meaningful connection to the world?

Ending the Torment

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Ken Chance, founder of the Arrowhead Lodge.

Digging Deeper Into Recovery

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Kevin Granich at Morningside Recovery.

Do You Forgive and When Should You?

From our partner not doing their share of the chores to infidelity, brutal mass murder and everything in between, there are many times in life when we are called on to forgive (or not). Consider these psychological facts before making your personal decision about forgiveness.

How John Steinbeck Convinced Me to Start a Writing Diary

For years I resisted keeping any sort of diary or journal, but reading the writing diary of John Steinbeck made me look at keeping one in a different light.

This Is Your Brain on Stress

Hey man, don’t stress me out! We’ve all experienced stress from threats (physical, social, and financial), fears, and uncertainty, Stress isn't just in your mind—it's in your brain. Stress changes your brain structure—and not in a good way. Click here to find out how to change it back!

Rwandan Stories of Change

The Genocide Archive Rwanda helps to preserve history, educate and promote peace building

Gay Marriage, Racism, and Obamacare: The Challenge of Caring

The gay marriage struggle, modern racism, and the disregard for the poor shown in the opposition to Obamacare all have a common root. We are wired for empathy, but not for a sense of common humanity and emotional openness. The challenge is not that we do not care: it is that we do.

Pushing Through Trauma

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Sean Walsh, of The Meadows.

An Honest, Heartfelt Portrayal of Bipolar Disorder

Hollywood depictions of mental illness usually are far off the mark. In Infinitely Polar Bear, Mark Ruffalo gives a rich, three dimensional, and deeply sympathetic performance as the bipolar father of two young girls.

Will Kennedy LeRoy’s Suicide Have Been in Vain?

By Izzy Kalman on June 25, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
I recently suggested that our anti-bullying efforts are failing LGBTQ kids. The truth is that they are failing all bullied kids. Sixteen-year-old Kennedy LeRoy committed suicide in the hope of preventing other bullied kids from doing the same. But the suicides won't cease until we stop trying to protect kids from bullying and start teaching them to handle it on their own.

The Impact of Cyberbullying: 3 Strategies to Help

Cyberbullying is a general term used to describe a form of bullying that takes place via electronic technology, such as blogs, chat rooms, emails, and other social media sites. It’s such a devastating form of bullying because it can happen literally at any time—24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Interpersonal Mistreatment as a Work Demand

Interpersonal mistreatment may be one of the demands that an employee faces at work. This post explores possible causes and consequences of interpersonal mistreatment, and discusses opportunities for thriving in the presence of this work demand.

When Bipolar Disorder Moved Into the House

By Hara Estroff Marano on June 24, 2015 in Brainstorm
In this new film, a bipolar father learns to take care of his two daughters Or did they take care of him?

The Data Doctor on Researcher-Practice Communication

A researcher asks the Data Doctor about the best ways to make share her work with practitioners, who live in a rather different universe despite some overlapping training in graduate school. Poor communication between researchers and practitioners is one of the biggest problems in the field today (and, I think, mostly the fault of researchers).

Why You Should Embrace Your Insecurities and Not Mask Them

Overcompensating for failure could be your downfall.

Bite Your Tongue, Silence Is Often Delicious

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Ambigamy
The talking cure doesn't always cure. We psychology fans can be slow to learn the power of silence—safe, sound non-response to provocation, letting things pass rather than processing.

Powerful Way to Raise Kids Focuses on the Strong

By Jason Powers M.D. on June 20, 2015 in Beyond Abstinence
Strength-based parenting is a powerful way to raise children. It involves identifying and fostering their positive personality traits, which provides them with the inner resources to deal with the stress of everyday life. The field of positive psychology calls these “signature strengths.”