All About Relationships

Love is one of the most profound emotions known to human beings. For some, romantic relationships are the most meaningful element in their lives, providing a source of fulfillment outside of ourselves. But the ability to have a healthy, loving relationship is not all innate. Failed relationships happen, and most of us have to work consciously to master the skills necessary to make them flourish. The good news is that with effort and perseverance, you can learn what you need to know to make your relationship last.

Recent Posts on Relationships

The 6 Worst Relationship Habits and How to Overcome Them

We typically think of habits as bothersome behaviors that affect us as individuals. However, there are habits that couples develop which can be just as bothersome, if not more so. By keeping us from getting the most we can out of our closest bonds with others, they can stand in between us and true relationship happiness.

Why Do Brain Injuries Look Like ADHD?

What you should know about the similarities and differences between brain injury and ADHD.

Do You Feel Like a Failure? 4 Things You Should Do

By Peg Streep on October 06, 2015 Tech Support
Taking a close look at why some people recover from failure, and others don't, and what you can do to help yourself.

Textual Relations

In Reclaiming Conversation, Sherry Turkle reprises her concerns about the downside of technology on family life, romantic relationships, friendships, education, work, and the public square. By "reclaiming conversation," she maintains that we can restore our capacity for self-reflection, empathy and genuine intimacy. But it won't be easy.

The Golden Rule in Love Relationships

By Stan Tatkin Psy.D. on October 05, 2015 The Puzzle of Love
Practicing the Golden Rule can transform a relationship. Couples who treat each other as they would like to be treated create a bedrock of security that will serve them well.

Criticizing Personal Autonomy

The free person is not the angry loner, willfully standing apart from those who would sap his energies. Nor is she the enthusiastic manager of others, who directs and controls their behaviors - and reaps the satisfactions of her manipulations. Free people are those who recognize the legitimacy of other people’s participation in their own lives

Friend or Foe?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on October 05, 2015 Your Wise Brain
Being friendly can make you feel confident and happy, have a positive take on other people, and move toward the world instead of backing away from it.

My College Daughter Hates Me

What to do when your college child distances herself.

Do You Say This One Word That Can Destroy Your Relationship?

This word creates a toxic, judgmental and controlling dynamic in loving relationships!

Preventing Regret

What people tend to regret the most near the end of their lives is that they have not been more compassionate, loving, and supportive to those they love. A presage of this kind of regret comes with the untimely death of a loved one. The common self-doubt, even in relationships that were very close and loving, is something like: “Did she really know how much I loved her?”

"Is Adolescence Really Necessary?"

In their disenchantment with some early adolescent changes in their child, parents wonder if this transformation really need be? The answer is: Yes, so the process of redefinition for growing up can get underway.

Face-to-Face Social Contact Reduces Risk of Depression

Having limited face-to-face social contact can nearly double someone's risk of depression, according to a new study.

Phubbing: How our Cellphone Obsession Harms Relationships

The term “phubbing” has been used to describe the act of interrupting or ignoring an in person conversation in order to attend to one’s cell phone. New research suggests that phubbing your romantic partner could be a sign, or even a cause, of discontent in your relationship.

Work, Love, Play: Do You Have a Healthy Inner Balance?

Do you have a healthy inner balance between work, love, and play? If not, this blog post offers some clues on how to create more inner balance inspired by theories of Erik Erikson and the insights of Doris Kearns Goodwin based on her extensive knowledge of former American presidents.

We Want to Accept Our Feelings, But How Do We Do It?

Focusing was developed through research into psychotherapy effectiveness. Eugene Gendlin found that those clients who were attending to their bodily felt experience in a caring, gentle way were making the most progress in psychotherapy. This article describes Focusing as a path of befriending our experience just as it is.

Yes, It Really Is Possible To Avoid Arguments. Part I.

When faced with a threat to our ability to influence or control our place in an important relationship, ancient fears can be activated that awaken memories or trauma from previous experiences in which others who possessed greater authority than ourselves may have exploited our vulnerability or dependency on them in ways that were hurtful or damaging to us.

The Hidden Trait that Predicts Being Attractive

Finding love is a tricky game. New evidence suggests that others' interest in you might be tied to your dispositional mindfulness.

Why Women Don't Make the First Move

In the traditional world of dating, men ask and women wait to be asked. A new dating app is changing the rules, but what makes women wait in the first place?

Connection: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

By Amy Banks on October 02, 2015 Wired For Love
No matter who you are or where you live, when you are in healthy relationships you increase the chance of living longer and dying happier.

Fear of Damage to Children in Polyamorous Families

Because polyamory is stigmatized in conventional society, many poly parents or other adults who love children being raised in poly families are concerned about how growing up in a polyamorous family might affect children. In this blog I include a question from a concerned mother and my response to her concerns about how her relationships might impact her kids.

When Getting Close Equals Getting Hurt, Part Two

Six key questions to consider to help your clients begin to take healthy risks towards seeking and sustaining closeness.

Five Fighting Words That Hurt Your Relationship

Do you fight dirty? These five words are hurting your relationship.

How Gratitude Builds (and Busts) Relationships

It was the email equivalent of the middle finger. I recently referred a friend of mine to a business coach colleague of mine, and days later I received a thank you, not from him, but from his assistant. Part of the reason why this encounter rubbed me the wrong way is because I am a gratitude junkie.

The Difference between Sadness and Depression

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on October 02, 2015 The Squeaky Wheel
Because we associate depression with its primary symptom of pervasive sadness, many of us struggle to tell the difference between these two common psychological states. And that is a huge problem.

10 Ways Coupling Has Changed Over the Past 75 Years

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 02, 2015 Living Single
In some significant ways, over the past three-quarters of a century, couples have been acting more like single people.

Brian Austin Green: Ringing in a New Start?

By Jane Greer Ph.D. on October 01, 2015 Shrink Wrap
Taking off your wedding band?

Are You Here? The Importance of Being Present

An instant efficiency fix in work and play.

Love and Fear With Liam Wilson of The Dillinger Escape Plan

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on October 01, 2015 Brick by Brick
Liam Wilson shares how he came to understand the power of questioning.

Trumpism: Daily Examples of a Stunning Lack of Compassion

Is one-upmanship, or Trumpism, becoming more prevalent than empathic or compassionate responses in our day-to-day lives?

Detection and Management of Depression and Bipolar Disease

By Julie K Hersh on October 01, 2015 Struck By Living
On September 1, 2015, the Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care at UT Southwestern under the direction of Dr. Madhukar Trivedi was officially launched. Dr. Trivedi, an internationally recognized expert in depression and mood disorders, received the 2015 American Psychiatric Association Award for Research, the Association’s most significant award for research.