Understanding Race and Ethnicity

Race and ethnicity play a pivotal role in our lives, informing how we see ourselves and the world. Communities built around racial and ethnic identity can offer internal sources of resilience. But these parts of our identity may also have adverse social implications, influencing our chances of receiving quality medical care, getting a job offer or a loan, or being wrongly stopped by the police. Despite the social significance of race, the clusters of common physical characteristics and the labels we use to describe it can change greatly over time. Ethnicity, meanwhile, may correspond with cultural practices such as the foods we enjoy, the languages we speak, and how we worship.

Recent posts on Race and Ethnicity

“Get Out:” From a White Woman’s Perspective

By Madelon Sprengnether on April 25, 2017 in Minding Memory
“Get Out” not only analyzes our nation’s history of dividing racial reality into either/or categories but also reveals the price we pay socially and culturally for doing so.

Report From NYC Satellite March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
The Satellite March for Science was 99% about Science, Not "Social Justice"

#MarchForScience, Social Media, Diversity and Identity

UCSF showcased a panel of scientific leaders at their Stand Up For Science day. What does this tell us about diversity in science, and about social media?

Why Hitler Did Not Use Chemical Weapons on the Battlefield

By Gordon Hodson Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Without Prejudice
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer recently stated (incorrectly) that Hitler did not use chemical weapons on his own people. How can psychology inform this discussion?

Why I am Marching in the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
Two reasons to march in The March for Science.

Familismo

Familismo is a Latinx cultural value. But it can facilitate mental health for people from any cultural background.
National Center for Education Statistics/U.S. Department of Education. Retrieve from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cnb.asp

Why Do Students of Color Feel Like an Imposter in School?

Do students of color have perceptions of intelligence? Some thoughts on feeling like an imposter

Can Religious Identity Inspire Pro-Environmental Action?

Religious identity can shape worldviews, build community, and provide networks of communication. So why is it so hard to motivate adherents to take pro-environmental action?

Working While Black

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 06, 2017 in Minority Report
We've heard of African-Americans being racially targeted while driving, a.k.a. "driving while black," but few are aware of another kind of bias.

Life as a Banana

Assimilation can be good for Asian Americans' mental health. But there may be hidden benefits of being Asian in the United States.

What Bias Looks Like for Me

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 03, 2017 in Minority Report
Do you feel warmly or coldly towards white people? How about Black people? Foreigners? Muslims? Christians? As you can see, there will always be those we feel more comfortable.

Dropping the Ball

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 02, 2017 in Minority Report
Whippings, lynchings, and killings of African-Americans are outlawed in this country but white NFL owners are showing us how they can operate like 19th century plantation "masters"

Bias isn't Bad

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 01, 2017 in Minority Report
Having candid conversations about race is very difficult as Caucasians may equate bias as being racist. As an Asian-American I can admit to having bias but the difference is....

Refugees Make Great Neighbors

Over time, refugees outperform native-born citizens academically, use health services less, and are less likely to commit crime. Inviting them into our communities is a win-win.

Child Abuse and Neglect: Why Prevention Is Important

Facts and resources for National Child Abuse Prevention Month.

On Interpreting Islamic Terror

We tend to see outgroup members as all alike to each other. But this simply isn't the case.

On Race and the Internet

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on March 30, 2017 in Media Spotlight
While the Internet has long been seen as the last bastion of free speech where anyone could post comments without fear, the dark side of this freedom is also apparent

The Trump Effect Part 1

Since the 2016 presidential campaign, increased bullying incidences in our schools have spread to include violent acts across our nation spurred by the rhetoric of one man.

Dear White People?

Use of group stereotypes should not only be offensive to you when aimed at a group with whom you identify. All bigotry is the same.
Dawn Henderson

Race-Related Trauma in the Public Education System

Are we missing an important dimension of trauma?

Prejudice Toward Relationships

By Holly Parker, Ph.D. on March 27, 2017 in Your Future Self
Relationships can face prejudice too, as society also passes judgment on couples whose pairing falls outside the lines of what it defines as customary and appropriate.

Translating Trauma: Foreign Language Interpreting in Therapy

Language is an essential part of cultural competence. Therapy with a foreign language interpreter can be awkward but help is available. Beverley Costa PhD offers tips.

Science Is Not Political

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
Nonetheless, science is embroiled in politics. Why is science so controversial, and why are the scientists planning a big march?

Safe Spaces and Free Speech

Find out what students think about this polarized issue, and give us your own thoughts on the matter.

The Continuing Importance of Jackie Robinson

By The Research Lab on March 20, 2017 in The Fundamentals
The 70th anniversary of Robinson’s debut. Where we are now. By Michael Cramer.

Lady Justice Is Not Color-Blind

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on March 19, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
The massive U.S. prison population does not mirror the demographic profile of U.S. society. There is a stark pattern of racial disparity in the prison population.

Sometimes Bigotry Is Just Bigotry

Has all the talk about white privilege been effective in weakening the attractiveness of President Donald Trump’s anti-group rhetoric toward some of our fellow Americans? No.

A Nose Away From Beautiful

Besides its critical function in smell and breathing, the cartilaginous protrusion we call nose has long been crucial in considerations of human beauty. How could this not be so?

Go Back to Your Country

Are your biases literally causing other people to suffer from mental health issues?

Cultivating Smarter Prejudices

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 10, 2017 in Ambigamy
An exploration of what prejudice really is, why we need it, how prejudices go wrong, and how to argue for better prejudices.