All About Psych Careers

In a sense, every career is a psychology career. Whether you're a salesman, a schoolteacher, or a sports coach, to be effective—and especially to advance in your career—you often need a fine-tuned understanding of what motivates people. 

Psychology itself is hardly a monolithic field. Careers that require formal training in psychology are incredibly varied: Providing clinical psychotherapy is very different from conducting research in a laboratory. People who work in psychology-related fields may be trained as psychologists, social workers, school counselors, researchers, or medical doctors. 

Recent Posts on Psych Careers

5 Reasons This Isn't Your Grandfather's Psychoanalysis

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on September 03, 2015 in Meaningful You
The image that many people have of psychoanalysis is from the 1950's or even earlier. Times change. And so has psychoanalysis.

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

What Extracurriculars Will Help Me Get into Grad School?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on September 01, 2015 in The Web of Violence
What are the best ways to spend your time outside of class to beef up your grad school applications? The Data Doctor responds.

Ten Academic Commandments for College Students

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on September 01, 2015 in Head of the Class
What are some straightforward strategies for academic success that any student can try? Here is a list of ten basic ones that are a great place to start, whether you are a new or a veteran student.

How Counselors and Coaches Can Stand Out From the Crowd

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in How To Do Life
With a counselor and coach under every rock, providers must stand out without being cheesy

Can We Trust Psychological Studies?

By Mark van Vugt Ph.D. on August 28, 2015 in Naturally Selected
Failure to replicate many psychological experiments offers gloomy picture of our field. Yet it is not as bad as it looks and there are ways out of the replication "crisis."

Student Questions: The Good, the Bad, and the Interesting

Lots of professors love it when students ask questions. At best, questions reflect activity and engagement. As a way to encourage students to ask questions, professors might say something like, “There’s no such thing as stupid questions.” I agree. But I would consider some questions to be “bad.”

Read Any Good Psychology Books Lately?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on August 25, 2015 in The Web of Violence
The Data Doctor gets asked about reading recommendations from a former student.

Psychologist vs Psychiatrist & More—What's the Difference?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on August 18, 2015 in The Web of Violence
The Data Doctor answers a question about the differences between the alphabet soup of all the psychology degrees--Ph.D., M.D., PsyD, Ed.D., DSW, DPH, etc.

Advice for Applying to Graduate School in Psychology

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on August 11, 2015 in Curious?
Over 10 concrete suggestions for getting into graduate school in psychology. Perfect for professors to send to students. And for students, this is a resource to help you with the "insider knowledge" I wish I had when I applied.

The Crucial First Week of College Classes: Get a Good Start

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on August 11, 2015 in Head of the Class
Freshmen or first-year college students can adjust to college and university life by developing good habits and routines for going to class and preparing for class. Such advice is obvious and helpful, but often ignored. If you are a freshmen or know one, read this advice. Why not give it try?

The ICD-10 Transition: You’re Probably Doing it Wrong

By David J Ley Ph.D. on August 07, 2015 in Women Who Stray
On October 1, 2015, healthcare providers in the US go through a major change to billing and diagnosing. This change has huge implications, and frankly, many providers aren't ready. This blog is intended to share some of my lessons learned, in hopes of helping others to minimize impacts on their agencies and patients.

Treating Sad Counselor Syndrome

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 06, 2015 in How To Do Life
It's not easy being a therapist, counselor, or coach. These ideas may help.

Art Therapy: It’s Not Just an Art Project

Are there circumstances where art itself is the proverbial therapist? This is a question that continues to rankle the profession called “art therapist” as well as those who are trying to establish a clearly defined scope of practice for the field.

5 Steps To Choosing Torture: Psychologists Breaking Bad

If you think the leaders in the American Psychological Association would interpret "Do no harm" broadly enough to mean: "Do not torture people," you are wrong.

The Meaning of the APA's Dealing With the Torture Scandal

After years of deception, and opposing strong and clear dissent from within its very ranks, the APA finds itself in a particularly awkward position. What does a professional organization which has lost its moral compass do when the news breaks? What does its reaction to the current controversy tell us about the APA’s organizational character?

5 Positive Lessons from Negative Comments

The media have been going wild this week covering Donald Trump's extreme and negative comments, focusing on how negative the comments were. My advice: Look at the substance of Trump's remarks--see what you can learn from them! Today I'm going to follow my own advice--not with Trump's comments, but with some negative comments I've received.

Deals, Divorce, Direction: Off-Label Uses for Psychoanalysis

By Wednesday Martin Ph.D. on July 16, 2015 in Stepmonster
The future of psychoanalysis and talk therapy might look like this....

Some Advice for First-Time College Students and Parents

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on July 13, 2015 in Head of the Class
It's normal for first time college students and their parents to be a little jittery about this exciting transition and there are things to think about and to do that can make it a good one.

Psychology Can Explain Why Psychologists Failed Their Ethics

By David J Ley Ph.D. on July 11, 2015 in Women Who Stray
It is the theories, research and findings of psychology itself, which can help us to both understand, and heal the wounds created by the ethical failings of the American Psychological Association's role in torture.

Training Reinvented

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 05, 2015 in How To Do Life
A radically different approach to training mental health professionals.

The Sexism in Science Controversies

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on July 02, 2015 in Rabble Rouser
Are scientific claims of sexism in science overstated?

10 Best Career Advice Websites

By Brad Waters on July 01, 2015 in Design Your Path
Need career advice? Here are 10 of my favorite career websites for 2015.

Conceptual Chicks & Experiential Eggs: Teaching Philosophies

Last spring I helped design a training program for aspiring college teachers. I had great fun being on the small planning committee; our disagreements were especially enlightening. My favorite disagreement was about whether we should have our students develop and write their teaching philosophy.

When to Sue Your Psychiatrist for Malpractice

By Ruth Lee Johnson J.D. on June 24, 2015 in So Sue Me
Many cases of psychiatric malpractice are never reported because the victims are already emotionally unstable. What exactly does it mean for a psychiatrist to commit malpractice?

Social Media in a Successful Psychotherapy Practice

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on June 24, 2015 in Meaningful You
Learning how to navigate the new terrain of social media in a professional manner is integral to the success of a psychotherapy practice.

23 Mental Health Professionals Interviewed About Their Jobs

By Brad Waters on June 24, 2015 in Design Your Path
Going behind the scenes with 23 mental health professionals to gain insight into the pros and cons of the industry.

Preparing to Serve

All sub-disciplines of psychology are represented in the general field of military psychology. Thus, the field offers opportunities for psychologists with interest in clinical practice, teaching, basic and applied research, and consulting.

Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Teaching Psychology

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Head of the Class
Fewer students enjoy reading for reading's sake—we need to integrate literary fiction and good non-fiction into the classroom. Doing so can bring psychological ideas alive but also help students appreciate reading for pleasure and insight into behavior.

Reflections on Therapeutic Mastery, Part 2

Excerpts from a personal interview, continued