All About Pregnancy

About four million women will give birth in the U.S. this year. Pregnancy and its attendant hormonal changes have varying effects on moms-to-be and their mental health. And a wave of research on the importance of the fetal environment shows its long term impact on physical and psychological development.

Recent Posts on Pregnancy

Five Common Myths about Miscarriage

Women and men alike have been found to have many misconceptions about miscarriages. In order to understand this experience and be able to support one's self and others going through such a loss, greater awareness of the truths about miscarriage is needed.

Makings of a Child

What is a father? How does assisted reproduction reshape how we think of fathers and mothers, and what are the consequences for children's genetic, epigenetic and cultural legacies?

Choosing to Be Child-free

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in A Sideways View
More and more people in the west are choosing not to have children. Is this a puzzle for evolutionary psychologists? What does the research say on this topic?

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

Pregnant? Easier to Be Fired Than You Think

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in Singletons
Pregnant or thinking of getting pregnant? More women are working while pregnant and working longer into their pregnancies than in previous decades, especially among those having their first child. In spite of laws to protect them, employers find ways to discriminate, circumvent the laws and dismiss them.

Worrying

By Joann P. Galst Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Fertility Factor
Uncertainty is one of the certainties of life. While difficult to cope with, there are ways to help yourself as you traverse your path to parenthood.

Should Elective Surgery Be Delayed for Very Young Children?

Accumulating evidence supports the possibility that general anesthetics have adverse effects on brain development in very young children. A recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial suggests that parents and doctors consider the risks and benefits of delaying elective surgery until children are 3 years old or older.

Are Men or Women More in Demand?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in The Human Beast
Men generally want to have sex earlier in a relationship than women. This is consistent with the pattern for other species where males are more eager to mate whereas females invest more in young and are more discriminating. How does this pattern play out in modern environments?

Vitamania! 15 Vital Facts About the Vitamins We Love

By Meg Selig on April 07, 2015 in Changepower
Are you a "vitamaniac?" 15 vital facts about vitamins and supplements, plus 5 questions to ask yourself before you take a vitamin or other supplement.

Shaming Women: Sex, Toys, and Cosmetic Surgery

Stigmatizing women continues. But let us be grateful to women's advocates -- those who expose the finger pointers.

Birth Your Way

By Sharon Praissman on March 28, 2015 in Beyond the Egg Timer
Women over 35 are more susceptible to birth interventions. However, training for labor, finding providers who meet your needs, and good fortune can lead to a happy birth experience.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Pregnancy Loss Etiquette

If approximately one million expectant parents per year experience a pregnancy loss, why do people struggle on how to act towards them? Most people are well intended and want to be supportive, but have no idea how to approach it.

What Parents Can’t Do

More than twice as many states required parental consent for mental health treatment than for substance abuse treatment.

Prenatal Drug Exposure and Disruption of Attachment

By Ira J. Chasnoff M.D. on March 20, 2015 in Aristotle's Child
For successful attachment between caregiver and infant to occur, the caregiver must be able to read and respond to the infant's cues and the infant must be able to read and respond to the caregiver's cues.

What the MTHFR Is Up with this Fancy Folate?

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on March 16, 2015 in Inner Source
How do you know if a common vitamin is actually harmful for you? Learn about the differences in folic acid and find out.

How the Menstrual Cycle Affects Women's Libido

By Michael Castleman M.A. on March 15, 2015 in All About Sex
Unlike dogs and cats, women don't experience "heat," but studies show a libido spike around ovulation.

Give Sorrow Words

Grief is the emotional response to the loss of a loved one, one of the most painful and confusing times in one’s life.

The Borderline Father

Women are more likely to have Borderline Personality Disorder, but men can be impacted as well. Here's how a Borderline father can affect you and some tips about what you can do about it.

Womb for One

By Robert D. Martin Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in How We Do It
The single-chambered womb of women is rare among mammals, which mostly have two separate womb chambers. Through developmental accident, a double womb occasionally recurs in women, but surprisingly does not stand in the way of successful pregnancy. Reduction from two chambers to one in evolutionary has some connection with single births, but there are twists in the story.

5 Must-Ask Questions When Your Doctor Prescribes Painkillers

So what’s a patient to do when they’re on the receiving end of an opioid painkiller prescription? Talk. It may not feel natural to question your caregiver—they are the one with the medical degree after all—but healthy skepticism is in order when opioids are recommended.

The Book That Changed My Life

By Sheila Kohler on March 09, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
I first encountered Proust’s work in what might be considered rather adverse yet somewhat Proustian circumstances. He was a favorite writer of my ex-husband and his southern mother who had discovered Proust on her own in the library in Kentucky where she had taken out Scott Montcrieff’s translation of Remembrance of Things past, and read it by chance.

Should Men Have a Voice in the Abortion Debate?

By Jesse Marczyk on March 07, 2015 in Pop Psych
It was recently suggested to me that men are not allowed to have opinion about abortion - even ones that happen to agree with the speaker. Naturally, I have some reservations about such a proposal

Fifty Shades: Glamorizing Abuse or Harmless Escapism?

The Fifty Shades Trilogy has provoked controversy because the story revolves around an abusive relationship. A group of researchers has argued that the books may harm women by glamorizing abuse. However, the authors' findings are inconsistent with their claims. Whether the books have a harmful influence or are simply titillating fantasy remains to be demonstrated.

Time for Sex? Or Time to Focus on Survival?

By John Launer M.D. on March 06, 2015 in Sex versus Survival
Everything we do – everything – is aimed directly or indirectly at reproduction. How on earth could it be otherwise?

Valerian for Sleep and Weaning Off Anxiety Medications

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on March 05, 2015 in Inner Source
Which herb may be the best for sleep, and also help avoid withdrawal from anti-anxiety drugs?

Are Pregnancy, Marriage, and Divorce Contagious?

We think our relationship decisions are decisions we make: but are we being influenced by our friends?

Where No Woman Has Gone Before? Empowerment in Prometheus

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Intersections
In the sci-fi future, gender stereotypes persist, and opportunities exist.

An International Adoptee's Need to Connect to Her Roots

An adult adoptee from India seeks funding for a documentary film about a search for her cultural roots.