All About Pregnancy

About four million women will give birth in the U.S. this year. Pregnancy and its attendant hormonal changes have varying effects on moms-to-be and their mental health. And a wave of research on the importance of the fetal environment shows its long term impact on physical and psychological development.

Recent Posts on Pregnancy

Stars, Bars, and Embryos

By Elliot Hosman J.D. on July 28, 2015 in Genetic Crossroads
The ideas of "choice" and "intent" have arisen in debates about both the confederate flag and prenatal genetic testing. But are these concepts insufficiently nuanced for these tough topics?

Pregnant and Anxious?

A woman who feels anxious during her pregnancy might think this is just what it feels like to be pregnant.

Managing Pregnancy Jealousy During Infertility

Feeling jealous of another woman’s pregnancy is common and normal when you are experiencing infertility. Instead of feeling guilty, try these 6 ways to give yourself a break.

Hormonal Changes that Trigger Depression in Women

One in four women will experience an episode of depression at least once in their lives.

Brace Yourself

By Joann P. Galst Ph.D. on July 12, 2015 in Fertility Factor
While egg freezing can offer a woman the possibility of extending her fertile years, it is a procedure that is far from benign in its psychological ramifications.

Policy Responses to Teen Pregnancy

The United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate in the Western world, and most of these pregnancies are unintentional. Importantly, teen mothers are less likely to finish high school and more likely to receive public assistance as compared to women who delay childbearing until after their teen years

The Motherhood Safety Net

By Juli Fraga on June 13, 2015 in The Birth of Motherhood
Expanding mental health screening for maternal mental health

Eating for Two: Is It Good For You?

By Nicole Avena Ph.D. on June 10, 2015 in Food Junkie
New book focuses on what to eat (instead of what to avoid eating) when pregnant.

Depression During Pregnancy Requires Detection and Treatment

Depression during pregnancy requires treatment.

Miscarriages: Conception Without Birth

By Robert D. Martin Ph.D. on June 02, 2015 in How We Do It
Miscarriage is a rarely discussed, almost taboo topic. Couples hit by pregnancy loss are usually unprepared and left alone to cope with grief and imagined guilt. Popular belief has it that miscarriage affects only 5% of pregnancies, but 15-20% are reported. Far greater losses occur before pregnancy is clinically recognizable, and only 25% of conceptions lead to birth.

Five Common Myths about Miscarriage

Women and men alike have been found to have many misconceptions about miscarriages. In order to understand this experience and be able to support one's self and others going through such a loss, greater awareness of the truths about miscarriage is needed.

Makings of a Child

What is a father? How does assisted reproduction reshape how we think of fathers and mothers, and what are the consequences for children's genetic, epigenetic and cultural legacies?

Choosing to Be Child-free

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in A Sideways View
More and more people in the west are choosing not to have children. Is this a puzzle for evolutionary psychologists? What does the research say on this topic?

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

Pregnant? Easier to Be Fired Than You Think

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in Singletons
Pregnant or thinking of getting pregnant? More women are working while pregnant and working longer into their pregnancies than in previous decades, especially among those having their first child. In spite of laws to protect them, employers find ways to discriminate, circumvent the laws and dismiss them.

Should Elective Surgery Be Delayed for Very Young Children?

Accumulating evidence supports the possibility that general anesthetics have adverse effects on brain development in very young children. A recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial suggests that parents and doctors consider the risks and benefits of delaying elective surgery until children are 3 years old or older.

Vitamania! 15 Vital Facts About the Vitamins We Love

By Meg Selig on April 07, 2015 in Changepower
Are you a "vitamaniac?" 15 vital facts about vitamins and supplements, plus 5 questions to ask yourself before you take a vitamin or other supplement.

Shaming Women: Sex, Toys, and Cosmetic Surgery

Stigmatizing women continues. But let us be grateful to women's advocates -- those who expose the finger pointers.

Birth Your Way

By Sharon Praissman on March 28, 2015 in Beyond the Egg Timer
Women over 35 are more susceptible to birth interventions. However, training for labor, finding providers who meet your needs, and good fortune can lead to a happy birth experience.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Pregnancy Loss Etiquette

If approximately one million expectant parents per year experience a pregnancy loss, why do people struggle on how to act towards them? Most people are well intended and want to be supportive, but have no idea how to approach it.

What Parents Can’t Do

More than twice as many states required parental consent for mental health treatment than for substance abuse treatment.

Prenatal Drug Exposure and Disruption of Attachment

By Ira J. Chasnoff M.D. on March 20, 2015 in Aristotle's Child
For successful attachment between caregiver and infant to occur, the caregiver must be able to read and respond to the infant's cues and the infant must be able to read and respond to the caregiver's cues.

What the MTHFR Is Up with this Fancy Folate?

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on March 16, 2015 in Inner Source
How do you know if a common vitamin is actually harmful for you? Learn about the differences in folic acid and find out.

Give Sorrow Words

Grief is the emotional response to the loss of a loved one, one of the most painful and confusing times in one’s life.

The Borderline Father

Women are more likely to have Borderline Personality Disorder, but men can be impacted as well. Here's how a Borderline father can affect you and some tips about what you can do about it.

The Book That Changed My Life

By Sheila Kohler on March 09, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
I first encountered Proust’s work in what might be considered rather adverse yet somewhat Proustian circumstances. He was a favorite writer of my ex-husband and his southern mother who had discovered Proust on her own in the library in Kentucky where she had taken out Scott Montcrieff’s translation of Remembrance of Things past, and read it by chance.

Should Men Have a Voice in the Abortion Debate?

By Jesse Marczyk on March 07, 2015 in Pop Psych
It was recently suggested to me that men are not allowed to have opinion about abortion - even ones that happen to agree with the speaker. Naturally, I have some reservations about such a proposal

Fifty Shades: Glamorizing Abuse or Harmless Escapism?

The Fifty Shades Trilogy has provoked controversy because the story revolves around an abusive relationship. A group of researchers has argued that the books may harm women by glamorizing abuse. However, the authors' findings are inconsistent with their claims. Whether the books have a harmful influence or are simply titillating fantasy remains to be demonstrated.