What Is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychological reaction that occurs after an extremely stressful event, such as physical violence or military combat. Those suffering from PTSD have recurring memories of the stressful event and are anxious or scared even in the absence of danger. Flashbacks and nightmares are common symptoms as well. 

Recent posts on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Barriers Prevent Soldiers From Seeking Psychological Help

Soldiers might face consequences for speaking up about mental health challenges.

Obstacles to Mental Health Care in Auto Accident Cases

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in The New Normal
Battlefront Michigan for quality of life
National Institute of Mental Health

Have You Lost Your Mind?

Scientists and journalists make claims that stress and trauma are toxic to the brain, but the claims are based on flawed studies.

Identifying Challenges Effecting Veteran Mental Healthcare

Why are veterans continuing to struggle?

How You Can Use Self-Talk to Step Forward

By Reid Wilson Ph.D. on July 27, 2017 in All about Anxiety
“Whatever it takes, I’m going to finish this.” When you face a daunting task, that message doesn’t instruct you; it encourages you to push through resistance and continue on.

Resilience: Saying Yes to Life

How the right attitude can become a powerful resilience strategy.

How to Talk to a Vet

By Robert Dingman Ed.D. on July 18, 2017 in Mind Matters
So many veterans feel distance and alienation from their civilian compatriots because they conclude that we really don’t want to know or can’t understand how they feel.

Six Ways To Beat Childhood Trauma & Stop Self-Sabotage

Recovery from trauma and growing beyond it can seem challenging and even impossible. Here are some potentially useful tools to begin to take the first steps.

New Study Links PTSD with More Gray Matter in Right Amygdala

Last year, scientists found that specific regions within the amygdala process positive or negative emotions. Now, a new study finds that PTSD is linked to a larger right amygdala.

Trauma Nation

By Stanton Peele on July 07, 2017 in Addiction in Society
The cultural movement of recovering trauma is actually a psychological disaster of its own making. The answers—forward planning and community building—are nowhere apparent.

Peace: The Best Prevention for PTSD

By Alice LoCicero Ph.D. on July 03, 2017 in Paradigm Shift
The best approach to reducing PTSD and suicide among military and veterans is to promote peace.
Wikimedia Commons

What is PTSD Exactly?

Back to the basics for understanding PTSD.

Loving Someone with an Anxiety Disorder

By Barbara Markway Ph.D. on June 29, 2017 in Shyness Is Nice
Here's a to-do list for when you love someone with an anxiety disorder.

Maggie's Story: The Many Reasons Why Not

Maggie Nelson wanted desperately to end her life, to end the pain. But she gave hope a chance and found her way to flourishing.
Shutterstock ID 127688339

Raising the Awareness of Child Traumatic Stress

By Amber A. Hewitt Ph.D. on June 27, 2017 in You, Empowered
Did you know that June 27 is National Post-Traumatic Stress Awareness Day?
Trauma dissociation

Cops and PTSD

By Ellen Kirschman Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Cop Doc
It's National PTSD Awareness Day; do you know a cop with PTSD?

The Connection Between Migraines and Psychological Trauma

By Jean Kim M.D. on June 26, 2017 in Culture Shrink
Migraines may have a neurobiological connection to the same systemic pathways that affect trauma and mood, and can occur more frequently in people with a history of abuse.

Some Advice on Coping Following Trauma

If you, a loved one or friend, has recently been through a traumatic and upsetting event, it may be worth considering some of the following ways of coping

Are Your Medications Giving You Nightmares?

By Gary L. Wenk Ph.D. on June 19, 2017 in Your Brain on Food
Given how widespread the use of many of these medications has become, it is amazing that most of us do not experience a nightmare every night.

National PTSD Awareness Month

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on June 16, 2017 in The New Normal
June is a time to celebrate a psychiatric revolution.
Boulder Crest Retreat

Finding Their Way Home: Posttraumatic Growth in Veterans

The same skills forged in battle can be leveraged to thrive at home.

How to Start Healing After Personal Trauma

Do you feel too fragmented after a traumatic event? A few lifestyle adjustments can help you feel whole again.
Wikimedia Commons

Stress Is Not Trauma

If you experienced a stressful event, is that the same as a traumatic event? The distinction is important, and one's beliefs about it may depend on one's motivations.

What are the Common Psychological Reactions to Trauma?

It is normal to experience various psychological reactions in the days following a traumatic event. But if these reactions persist for several weeks it may be time to seek help

Accompaniment: An Ethic Beyond Accidental Fences

By G.A. Bradshaw PhD, PhD on June 03, 2017 in Bear in Mind
Liberation psychologists and Wild Turkeys show us how to transform from an anthropocentric "them" to a trans-species "us" worldview.

Sometimes Amazing Things Happen

An estimated 15% of these incarcerated men and women will have a serious mental illness, and approximately 50% have an active substance use disorder, or both.

How Common Is PTSD In Primary Care Settings?

New data suggests that PTSD is common in primary care settings. Are patients getting the attention they need for this condition?

The Road to Recovery Is Paved With...Music?

During the 2017 Memorial Day concert, singer Renee Fleming shared four ways music therapy can help injured soldiers. Here's an explanation.

Desensitization of Terrorism

Has society become desensitized to terrorism?