What Is Positive Psychology?

Positive psychology is the study of happiness. Psychology traditionally focused on dysfunction: people with mental illness or other psychological problems and how to treat them. Positive psychology, in contrast, is a relatively new field that examines how ordinary people can become happier and more fulfilled.

Recent Posts on Positive Psychology

16 Breaking up Tips and How Journaling Eases Heartbreak

Even if ending the relationship was your wish,prepare for an empty feeling inside. When you have had the talk, instead of recounting feelings of anger, wish your partner joy. Research tells us that writing about the positive aspects of the relationship has healing value.

3 Reasons You Need Mental Strength to Thrive

Building mental strength will help you reach your greatest potential, despite whatever challenges you face.

Good Faith

By Russ Gerber on April 22, 2015 in Our Health
Materialism or spirituality? Which way should you go? Which way can you count on?

Making a Change? Remember the Key Ingredient!

When I listen to people speak about changes they are making, they often speak as if they have no control. They say things like “I’ll have to wait and see what happens” or “I just hope things go back to the way they were.” These statements indicate a passivity—a sense of inaction. They forget they have core internal qualities that give them some control.

Dreaming Makes New Connections

By Michelle Carr on April 15, 2015 in Dream Factory
Research shows that REM sleep integrates recent emotional memories by forming broad associations to past experience. Could your dreaming style steer the connections your mind makes during sleep?

Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning

What makes children want to learn? Curious children often spend a great deal of time reading and acquiring knowledge because they sense a gap between what they know and what they want to know—not because they are motivated by grades.

7 Secrets to Hitting Your Reset Button

Dr. Michael Roizen, co-author with Dr. Oz on the best-selling YOU series, has just published a new book, “This is Your Do-Over.” The book provides 7 secrets to better physical health. Fortunately, these same secrets are the pathway to positive mental health, happiness, and well-being.

Happiness, Meaning and Taxes

By John Sean Doyle on April 11, 2015 in Luminous Things
Sometimes we find the meaning in our lives only when we set aside those things that are the best and most beautiful about us... Sometimes for our lives to matter we must delay our dreams and passionate engagements and instead do our duty.

Do the Brain Dance

Dancing stretches the mind and exercises the heart making us physically and emotionally stronger. Dancing communicates deep feelings and connects us to others in intimate ways. Dancing imparts meaning and a sense of accomplishment. Dancing is positive psychology in action. Put it to work in your classroom.

Happinesses

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 10, 2015 in One Among Many
I found 26 blog posts on happiness in my blog archive. Here’s a list of them with a brief statement of contents for each. Peace and happiness!

The Cerebellum, Cerebral Cortex, and Autism Are Intertwined

Neuroscientists have identified a new marker for autism based on abnormal connectivity between specific regions of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex.

The Zen of Love

What propels a person to leave the beaten path and try something new? We seem to be predetermined by our early experiences, especially when it comes to abuse and neglect. Yet, some people free themselves of their conditioning and leap into something they have never encountered: love. Little do we comprehend when it comes to leaps, but what we know may just be a good start.

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

The positive psychology movement has started to ask "what is healthy," "what is working," and "what are a child’s strengths" as central—and often more important—than what is wrong or what disorder or illness does a child have... and this can change lives.

Black and Yellow: Blasian Narratives

These “Blasians” are creating something new, testing how much unity there is in such diverse experiences of Blackness and Asian-ness.

The 7 Secrets of a Happy Brain

How do educators help wire the naturally curious and optimistic student's brain? How do they activate the executive functions essential to learning in nurturing and not harsh ways? Unlocking the secrets of the happy brain is the key to happy classrooms.

Want To Be A Hero? Embrace Suffering and Sacrifice

The wisdom gleaned from theology and psychology reveals six ways that suffering and sacrifice are beneficial to human beings.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 3 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on April 04, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute, in 1,000 words or less, the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." In a three-part blog post, I explain why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

What Constitutes Psychological Health?

By Gregg Henriques on April 03, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
Psychological health is often a vague notion that is characterized in terms of the absence of psychopathology. This blog briefly reviews some frames for thinking explicitly about what constitutes psychological health.

The Fake Sanity Clause*

By Hal Mathew on April 03, 2015 in Unagoraphobic
If you can look this content you can feel this content

What Kind of Angry Are You? (Part 2)

In order to get the important message that anger is trying to deliver, you need to steer clear of your old, unhealthy avoidance habits and let your inner communication come through.

Language

Language represents a huge developmental leap. Think of all the things we can accomplish with our words and language. We can enhance relationships with our children. We can share feelings and ideas.

Commit to Self-Compassion

By Wendy Paris on March 31, 2015 in Splitopia
Self-compassion is a powerful force when it comes to getting through a divorce and getting on with your life.

It's Time to Take the "Positive" Out of Positive Psychology

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on March 30, 2015 in Between You and Me
What is the prescription for optimal living? The burgeoning field of positive psychology appears to have many of the answers: We should be kind to others, forgiving of transgressions, gracious and compassionate in our daily lives, and optimistic about the future. Following this simple plan should keep us happy and healthy. It turns out the answer might not be so simple.

7 Secrets of Happy Couples

We all want loving and successful relationships but we don't all know how to achieve them! Research shows that certain ways of being together can create the glue that holds your relationship intact for the long haul. Read about some things you can do right now to make your relationship happier and healthier.

Crossing Borders with Humor

I'm amazed to realize that he did those crazy things to connect with people

Posttraumatic Growth in Northern Ireland

Little is known about post traumatic growth in conflict situations

Surprise

By The Book Brigade on March 26, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Surprise is good for the brain, great for relationships, and adds a certain frisson all around. Without it, life is lackluster. So why don't more people embrace the unexpected? They run from it or try to subdue it when they should instead roll with it.

The Quiet Advocate Behind Thriving Youth

All youth need supportive adult relationships beyond their parents—mentors who believe in them and their potential. Are you a mentor to young people? Learn how to foster their success.

Rescue the Mangroves, Rescue Ourselves?

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Listen Up!
A small, dirt-road fishing village on the Pacific coast of Mexico organizes to restore their threatened ocean environment and provides hope for all of us. They remind us of the powerful hunger to take care of the natural world and "our animal relatives."

Research Backs Schools' Decision to Ditch Outdated Homework

By Rebecca Jackson on March 24, 2015 in School of Thought
Parents are not given any instruction on how to administer homework. It's assumed that they understand how—presumably based on their own experiences in school. That's ridiculous. Homework has changed dramatically over the past two decades! This article sifts through the current research to show why some homework methods are outdated.