The Psychology of Politics

The world of politics reflects human nature in all its rational and irrational glory. How we govern ourselves and make decisions, use and often abuse power, reflect our deepest fears at least as much as our aspirations and ideals. Because many of the world's biggest problems are behavioral in nature, policies, to be successful, must grapple with our innermost attitudes.

Recent posts on Politics

De-crazifying Crypto, Part II: An Open Letter to Wall Street

By Moses Ma on September 19, 2017 in The Tao of Innovation
Bitcoin may end up a bubble, but the total market cap for all blockchain ventures in a decade could be in the hundreds of billions. So focus on blockchains, not bitcoins.

A Profile of North Korea’s “Dear Respected Comrade Leader"

The Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics has developed a personality and leadership profile of Kim Jong Un.
Wikicommons

Mundus Novus (The New World)

By Chris Kutarna Ph.D. on September 18, 2017 in Age of Discovery
Overwhelmed by the pace of change? Some conscious map-making helps us navigate a new world.
Pixabay

Trauma-Informed Approaches: The Good and the Bad

By Michael S. Scheeringa M.D. on September 17, 2017 in Stress Relief
Trauma-informed lens, toolkits, and approaches are all the rage. But how do these improve our lives, and how have they overreached into the undesirable sphere of truthiness?

Conservatism Predicts Lapses Back to Meat Consumption

By Gordon Hodson Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Without Prejudice
Although those on the right eat more meat in general, some nonetheless attempt to quit. New research provides insights into why they may struggle.

Courage and Conscience in Today's America

By Brenda Berger Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Hearts and Minds
Whatever happened to the home of the free and the brave?
U.S. Government photo, public domain

Ignorance Isn't Bliss—It's Frightening

By David Niose on September 14, 2017 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Survey numbers show Americans lack knowledge of basic civics. What does it mean?

Moving from Fault to Cause

By Miki Kashtan Ph.D. on September 14, 2017 in Acquired Spontaneity
I am confident that fighting back, name calling, shaming, denouncing, and other similar tactics recently are feeding rather than quelling this upsurge of white supremacy.

A Snapshot of America in 2017

A new poll about Americans' attitudes about race suggests cause for concern and raises some tough questions.

Would a Woman's Party Boost Well-Being?

Need a boost after seven months of Trump? Try a National Woman's Party.

Fighting the Normalization of Post-Truth Politics

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on September 13, 2017 in Intentional Insights
We should be deeply concerned with the normalization of post-truth politics. Fortunately, psychological strategies provide a way to combat this problem.

Gaydar Goes AI and Populism Comes to Science

An upcoming study on a computer program that categorizes sexual preference from photos has come under fire.

Obverse Psychology: A Better Response to Know-It-Alls

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on September 12, 2017 in Ambigamy
How to respond to someone who reverses or deflects every challenge, always claiming the "correct" side of the coin for themselves? You expose how we're all dealing with both sides.

This Is What Happens When Science Is Rejected

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in The First Impression
What are the connections between the recent weather catastrophes across the globe and the Trump administration's policies regarding science and climate change?

The Root of All Hypocrisy

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on September 08, 2017 in Ambigamy
In a pinch, we pull out bogus one-size-fits-all moral rules that we can't, won't, and shouldn't try to live by.

Taking Risks to Move the Culture Forward

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on September 07, 2017 in More Than Mortal
Chatting with the founder of a new online magazine dedicated to publishing diverse views in politics, science, culture, and the arts.

Can Brain Imaging Teach Us Anything about Racism?

Confused and exasperated over recent events in Charlottesville? Here's a look into what neuroscience can and can't tell us about racism.

Facebook Unfriended: A Wake Up Call for Whom?

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D., LMFT on September 05, 2017 in Intersections
Being unfriended presents an opportunity to explore concepts like white fragility, misplaced nostalgia, courage, and authenticity in the FaceBook universe.

Trump's Transgender Gaslighting

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Intentional Insights
Is the Trump administration's spin around the transgender directive gaslighting the transgender community?
ibtimes

Did Trump Create A Moral Panic To Get Elected?

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
Is it possible for influential individuals or groups to achieve their goals by either creating or exploiting widespread public fear?

Misremembering American History

Do you know your American history? Your reaction to current events may reveal some surprising blind spots.

Polarization Of Groups Never Ends Well

We live in difficult times with extreme polarization of groups resulting in divisiveness everywhere. Research in psychology informs us that this never ends well. So, push back!

Hate Mail as Data

I published an analysis of Trump voters & soon the hate mail started to arrive. Social scientists should look at this as data as an opportunity to study those who reject science.

Biased Algorithms?

Algorithms govern most aspects of our lives with secret, biased methods. A data scientist turned activist gives us tips to uncover these biases and demand accountability.

Five Things Transgender Kids Want Adults to Know

By Jack Turban MD MHS on September 03, 2017 in Political Minds
Adults on both sides on the aisle have argued passionately about how trans youth should be treated. Lost among these voices are those of the children themselves.

Lumping and Splitting: Balancing Connection and Safety

We live in an age of political splitting. From left to right, differences are highlighted, commonalities submerged. Individual and cultural health instead demands a balance.

Democratizing Play

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on September 01, 2017 in Play in Mind
“Social leisure” that once enriched American life has declined as Americans have forsaken group play (bowling leagues and bridge nights, for instance) for more solitary amusement.

Bargain Life:

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on August 31, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
The Houston disaster fascinates us because the conflicts reflect storms within us.

Should You Donate to Disaster Relief?

Disasters capture our attention and emotions, but we may do more good by ditching empathy as a moral guide.

The Psychology of Political Violence

Political violence has its roots in anger, contempt, and disgust; three emotions familiar to all of us. Maintaining our civic values requires avoiding the impulse to dehumanize.