New findings in psychology and neuroscience are pushing philosophers to rethink such big questions as the relationship between mind and body, the meaning of free will, just exactly what faith is, the nature of consciousness, and what constitutes happiness. There's some evidence that issues such as free will itself reflect temperament and personality. There's even more evidence that we are terrible at predicting what will make us happy, which is why we have such a hard time finding durable happiness.

Recent posts on Philosophy

We're All Artists

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 29, 2017 in Minority Report
"Aren't we all artists?" was the response I received when I asked a Parisian shop owner if he was an artist or if he just sold art. This experience redefined how I saw "artists".
Image by Pixabay

I Got Hacked! Fibs, Fantasies, and Techo-Lies

By John Nosta on April 27, 2017 in The Digital Self
Is technology the newest excuse for being late, lazy and lackadaisical?

Religious and Rational?

Can you be religious and rational? A United Methodist minister provides his answers to that question!

If People Only Knew

So many of us fear what we - and others - will find at our core. Why is there such an epidemic of shame in our culture?
Image by Stocksnap.io

Why You Just Might Fall in Love With a Robot

By John Nosta on April 25, 2017 in The Digital Self
Thoughts on human compassion and a bag of bolts.

Struggling With Temptation?

By Katherine Hawley Ph.D. on April 25, 2017 in Trust
Is it better to battle temptation, or to never be tempted at all?
C.M. Coolidge, A Friend in Need / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Are You a Good Critical Thinker?

A proposal about what it is to be a good critical thinker. And a totally unscientific quiz to test your critical thinking skills.

Is Alex Jones a Conspiracy Theorist or a Performance Artist?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on April 23, 2017 in Psych Unseen
If Jones isn't delusional, what about his followers?

Why Do People Cherry-Pick Which Science They Accept?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in Ambigamy
By not explaining why anything matters, science becomes dubious enough that we can easily escape its inconvenient truths.

Why it Pays to Be Rich (in More Ways Than One)

Rich Americans continue to live longer. And this means they collect more government benefits. What should we do about it?

The Science of Religion for Everyone

Why insist that religion is immune from scientific study when cognitive and evolutionary theories have already made great strides in explaining a wide array of religious phenomena?

Before Adam and Eve

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on April 19, 2017 in The Secular Life
Biblical myths are just that: myths.

Of March and Myth: The Politicizing of Science

What differentiates science from other disciplines is a focus on testing of hypotheses. Is science now struggling with a 'crisis of confidence'? Is a March for Science the answer?

The Secret of Handling Anger and Aggression

Why is anger such an accelerator of aging?
Hma with Permission

Little Gestures

Language and its roots in gestures.

Why I am Marching in the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
Two reasons to march in The March for Science.

Rabble Rouser Goes Twitter

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
Scientific psychology, social psychology, scientific dysfunction, the psychology of scientific integrity, science reform, in a nutshell, on a daily basis.

How to Choose a Long-Term Romantic Partner

There are probably “50 ways to leave your lover,” but far fewer ways to choose the one who will stay with you for the long term.
Jenny Kaczorowski (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

I Did the Best Thing I Could. So Why Do I Feel Bad?

By Lisa Tessman Ph.D. on April 12, 2017 in I'm Only Human
Moral values come in many different kinds, and they can come into conflict with each other, sometimes creating situations in which anything we do will involve violating some value.
Hana Chramostova / Public Domain Pictures / CC0 Public Domain

Can You Be Happy in The Matrix?

Two people have exactly the same experiences. One's trapped in the Matrix. The other's in the real world. Who's happier? And what evidence is supposed to decide this issue?

Face-it Versus Escapist Coping Strategies

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 10, 2017 in Ambigamy
Do you reduce stress in ways that increase or decrease your peripheral vision?

A New Big Five for Psychotherapists, Part II

We can transcend the paradigms in psychotherapy by thinking in terms of systems of character adaptation.

A New Big Five for Psychotherapists (Part I)

Psychotherapists should not think in terms of paradigms, but five systems of character adaptation: 1) habits; 2) emotions; 3) relationships; 4) defenses; and 5) justifications.
Tyler Seeberger/Creative Commons

It's Not Whether You Win or Lose But How You Tell Your Story

Although we can't always control the plotline of our lives, happy endings are often a matter of choice.

You Use "You" to Make Meaning Out of Misery

A recent study shows that a perennial pet peeve of English teachers actually serves a useful psychological function.

Consciousness in Other Animals

This post discusses the challenge of determining whether or not the experiences of other organisms have the same phenomenal quality of our typical conscious experiences.

Growing Old in Ancient Greece and Rome

Is past prologue? Part 2 of our exploration of aging in past cultures.

How Paradoxes Populate Our Lives

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on March 31, 2017 in Excellent Beauty
Have you ever experienced something that was too sad for words? Then you have also experienced a paradox. And paradoxes make our lives beautiful.

Addiction and Self-Deception

Why do addicts hold on to false beliefs about their use?

Life and Death in Every Moment

When I embrace life and death in every moment it makes life richer.