How to Persuade

How do you get people to think and behave a little differently? Persuasion is an art—If you push too hard, you will risk being aggressive. If you nudge too lightly, you may turn into a pest. A thoughtful, persuasive argument can lead you to getting what you want. Here's how.

Recent posts on Persuasion

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How the News Media Make Monsters

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
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In Mediation, Is Empathy Enough or Even Necessary?

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Seeking Common Ground 3: Reasserting the American Commitment

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DFID - UK Department for International Development/WikiCommons

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Foss and Griffin’s invitational rhetoric describes a foundation for therapy and what ought to be a foundation for marital spats and diversity dialogues.

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By Rob Henderson on May 24, 2017 in After Service
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The United States Navy and The Communist Manifesto

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The Arguer

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 04, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story.

How and Why Societal Elites Manipulate Public Fear

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on April 30, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
Public fear over an alleged social problem is mutually beneficial to state officials—that is, politicians, law enforcement authorities and the news media.

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The Hidden Tug of Marketing

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Shouldn't Lawyers Understand the Art of Persuasion?

Lawyers could more effectively represent their clients if they understood the art of persuasion.
Emily Morter/Stocksnap

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By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on March 17, 2017 in A Swim in Denial
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