All About Personality

Questions of personality have vexed mankind from the dawn of personhood: can people change? How do others perceive me? What is the difference between normal and pathological behavior? One's personality is so pervasive and all-important that it presents a clinical paradox of sorts: it is hard to assess our own personality, and impossible to overlook that of others.

Recent Posts on Personality

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) And Addiction

The core feature of BPD is impulsivity and poor emotional regulation.

The Trouble With Facebook

How To Use Facebook

Can't Stand Your Self-Absorbed Parent?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on July 30, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Got an aging parent or in-law who's a narcissist? They're arrogant, have a sense of entitlement, are always ready to instill guilt, they insist rules don't apply to them, and they fly into a rage if challenged. There's help for you.

Do Dog Owners Make Better Lovers? Some Scientific Answers

By Peg Streep on July 30, 2015 in Tech Support
Some studies have shown that dog owners like to dominate but that they're also more sociable than people without pets or people who prefer cats. But did you know that the presence of a dog changes how we assess someone, even a stranger? That and more....

The Surprising Shadow Side of a Narcissist

Like the boy Narcissus in the Greek tale, narcissists are in love with their own appearance. They expect others to be mirrors of themselves.

Creative Concerns

At first glance, the notion that creativity perturbs us is oxymoronic. We live in an age in which we are encouraged to prize all things ingenious. However, novelty also brings risk and uncertainty.

Donald Trump and Our Obsession With Narcissistic Leaders

By Ray Williams on July 28, 2015 in Wired for Success
Americans are obsessed with narcissistic leaders, or at least they have an ambivalence between the ones they like and the ones they promote.

What Narcissists REALLY Want, and Can Never Get

Among other things, narcissists typically come across as arrogant, manipulative, entitled, and woefully lacking in empathy. But if these defining features are understood at a deeper level—as powerful psychological defenses to protect them from experiencing a truly frightening vulnerability—a quite different picture of them emerges. . . .

Childhood Sexual Abuse Taken Out of Context

Child sexual abuse is a big risk factor for a wide variety of psychiatric disorders. But why do some victims turn out one way, others a different way, and still others turn out without any disorders at all? So called empirical studies of child abuse are limited to such variables as who the perpetrators were, what did they do, and how often. There's a lot more to the story.

How Do You Handle Your Insecurities?

It’s natural to feel insecure from time to time, but these feelings can get in the way of your happiness. Figuring out where those insecurities come from is the first step to overcoming them.

Why Your View of the Future Can Make You Depressed

Most people assume that if you're depressed, that colors your view of your future. New research turns that thinking on its head, showing that, for many, if your view of your future is negative to begin with, that can actually make you depressed. The flip side is that a positive view of your future stimulates greater mental health.

Resolving the “Conscientiousness Paradox”

Conscientious individuals generally have good outcomes, but countries with high national levels of conscientiousness generally have poorer levels of human development. What does this apparent "conscientiousness paradox" mean?

Memory, Body Language and Personality in Soccer

By Ben Lyttleton on July 27, 2015 in Twelve Yards
USA lost its Gold Cup soccer play-off to Panama on penalties - but could the team have avoided defeat?

News stories with the power of empathy

Depicting physical pain and discomfort may make for compelling journalism, but it also could undermine audiences' empathetic responses and perpetuate what neuroscientists call the 'empathy gap.' Instead, efforts to capture people's emotional suffering may be more likely to evoke empathy, even though that's much trickier for reporters trained to 'show, don't tell.'

Cheating Yourself? I Hear the Advice, I Do What I Want

Real behaviour change is not about willpower, or stages of change, but about satisfying wants and dealing with needs along the way.......it is about coherence at all levels of the person......

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.

10 Signs You’re Dating a Narcissist

The Mayo Clinic research group defines narcissistic personality disorder as “a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance and a deep need for admiration. How do you know when you’re dating a narcissist? Here are ten telltale signs...

Are You a Giver or a Taker?

Think you are a Giver? There's something to watch out for that could turn you into a Taker.

"Should I Believe What the Internet Says About Borderlines?"

"I have read things on the Internet and I am worried that being my boyfriend or family member is a form of torture (although my current boyfriend assures me he likes being with me). Am I really like those people?"

Does Your Prospective Boss's Personality Suit You?

Compatibility with your prospective boss is the one factor that will likely have the most profound impact on job satisfaction, and maybe your career. Yet it’s remarkably neglected in the job interview. It's the elephant in the room that not enough job seekers dare to uncover. If you ask the right questions, however, you'll greatly increase your odds of success.

I, Me, Mine

Americans, as a group, are becoming more individualistic. But what about people in other countries? In collectivist China, for example. Do they also have a Generation Me?

How To Become More Resilient

Resiliency is the way in which someone copes with life's adversities. You might assume that some people are simply more resilient than others. The fact is that resiliency may be more of a lifestyle choice than anything else. While some might be innately more resilient than others, resiliency can be a learned behavior resulting in a healthier outlook on life.

Why Changing My Name Was & Wasn't the Worst Thing I Ever Did

By Anneli Rufus on July 21, 2015 in Stuck
I changed my name, regretted it for decades, then did something about it.

Finding a Secure Base and Rewiring Your Personality

One way to change your insecure attachment style to that of having an “earned” secure style is to find and nurture your own secure base in adulthood. Learn what to look for and how to create for yourself the experiences that naturally instill mental health and well-being. It is never too late to rewire your personality in a way that works better for you and leads to more h

Confirmation Bias and Stigma

Confirmation bias confirms not only expectations about the percept, but also those relating to the kind of world we live in and our role in it.

Do You Ever Pretend You’re Somebody Else?

I decided I couldn’t live in a world without Robby. The only thing to do was to take his place. I’d have to become Robby. No, not “become Robby.” I’d be Robby.

The Deafening Silence of Passive Aggressive Behavior

Has a relative, colleague, or friend ever gifted you with a passive aggressive present or backhanded compliment as their way of trying to prove a point or express their hostility wordlessly?

Personal Intelligence: Are You Using Yours?

You've heard a lot about emotional intelligence. Now there's a new kid on the block.

A Deeper Look at the Evil Within

By Guest Bloggers on July 17, 2015 in Brainstorm
When ordinary people took on roles of prisoners and guards, even the researchers were shocked at what happened. With the release of a Stanford Prison Experiment movie, here's a look at the research surrounding the study people are still arguing about decades later.

Men Systemize. Women Empathize.

An important variable that we can use to differentiate between users is gender. Research has provided evidence that there are inherited differences between the cognitive style of men and women—in other words, the way men and women think, perceive, and remember information.