All About Personality

Questions of personality have vexed mankind from the dawn of personhood: can people change? How do others perceive me? What is the difference between normal and pathological behavior? One's personality is so pervasive and all-important that it presents a clinical paradox of sorts: it is hard to assess our own personality, and impossible to overlook that of others.

Recent posts on Personality

Severe Mental Illness Does Not Preclude Legal "Sanity"

A mental illness does not necessarily preclude choice.

Charles Manson: The Cult Of Personality Surrounding A Killer

Micael Dahlén and Magnus Söderlund from the Stockholm School of Economics propose that murderers can be idolised and found attractive precisely because of their homicidal behaviour

Measurement Validity Explained in Simple Language

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Cui Bono
How do we know that a test that allegedly measures shyness actually measures shyness?

Are Psychopathy and Heroism Two Sides of the Same Coin?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on November 16, 2017 in Media Spotlight
A new research study looking at first responders suggests that heroes and psychopaths have more in common than you might think.

Roadblocks to Intimacy & Trust X: Breaking the Silence

I know of no relationship that improved without conversation.

Block the Pop-Ups: Think Less, Think Better

By Nicole F. Bernier, Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Ripening With Time
Imagination is used in a positive way whenever it brings peace. Imagination is used negatively whenever it brings unnecessary agitation.

Stars Who Sexually Harass and Fans Who Love and Hate Them

How do we deal with it when someone we love does something we hate?

Borderline Personality Disorder and Ability to Read Emotions

Being unable to decode emotions seems to be an inherent feature of borderline personality disorder but new research shows it’s not as inevitable as you might think.
eric maisel

What You Can Expect From an Authoritarian, Part 2

Based on research on authoritarian wounding, learn what you can expect from authoritarian contact and how you can heal the wounds inflicted by that contact.

Do Optimists Live Longer?

By David Rosen on November 14, 2017 in Health 2.0
Do optimists live longer? Research into how optimism influences our response to health threats and our attitude to risk-taking behaviour throws up some fascinating insights.

The Vices of Conspiracy Thinking

By Katherine Hawley Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Trust
Trying to argue with conspiracy theorists can be distressing. Instead, philosophers suggest we should talk about intellectual character, virtue, and vice.

Why Do We Have an Empathy Deficit?

Have you been feeling an empathy deficit? If so, here's how to deal with it.

Mass Public Shootings Are on the Rise

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
There are powerful social forces today that promote mass murder, including financial fears, distrust of government, prejudice and racism, terrorism and constant war.

Parenting Strategies Are Largely Ineffective

By Michael Karson Ph.D., J.D. on November 13, 2017 in Feeling Our Way
5 Ideas: Will parents use them? 1. Childhood is not all preamble.

Why We Might Feel Lonely Around Narcissism

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on November 13, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Experiencing an unstable sense of self is a challenging experience on many levels. Empathy in narcissism is shaped by sense of self, as researchers are exploring.

Are Racial Microaggressions on College Campuses Harmful?

A new study of college students finds that psychological harm due to racial microaggressions are real and not explained by the personality trait called neuroticism.

Self-Sabotaging Emotional Intelligence

When looking for the negative becomes married to poor self-perception or negative self-talk, it creates a cascade of emotions, dragging us down a rabbit hole of our own making.

Walking the Tightrope of Change: When Virtue Becomes Vice

How to keep transitions from spoiling your best qualities.
Library of Congress

Lead or Follow? An Introvert Weighs the Challenges

By Sophia Dembling on November 08, 2017 in The Introvert's Corner
After year one of political activism, I'm wondering if I have the will to be a leader.
eric maisel

What You Can Expect From an Authoritarian

Based on Dr. Maisel's primary research on authoritarian wounding, learn what you can expect from authoritarian contact and how you can heal the wounds inflicted by that contact.

How Sports Can Make You Healthier and Build Character

Go outside and play! How sports and play provide your child with higher motivation, self-confidence, and social skills.

Five Types of High-Conflict Personalities

Understanding five high-conflict personalities can help us to be more careful and effective with those around us.

Practice, Hard Work, And Giving Up

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on November 05, 2017 in Pop Psych
When it is is good to give up

The Eight Basic Qualities in All Personality Disorders

Personality disorders are complex and some believe they defy classification. A recent study shows eight interpersonal qualities that can provide new understanding.

Can You Turn Sucking Up On and Off?

The monster within: How habitual toadying transforms you.

Machiavellians: Self-Made or Born that Way?

Are master manipulators genetically programmed that way, or do they become Machiavellians over time?

The Characteristics of the Conspiracist

The desire to feel special can result in some poor decision-making.

Why You Should Smile in Your Online Photo

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 01, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
When selecting a handsome photo to augment your witty dating profile text, consider that photo selection can quickly define your desirability—or lack thereof.

The Most Attractive Trait Displayed During First Impression

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 01, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
First impressions are best formed in person because emotions matter. Responsive strangers are found to be attractive and desirable.