All About Parenting

Parenting is the ultimate long-term investment. Be prepared to put far more into it than you get out of it, at least for some time. Given the stresses of contemporary American culture, the happiness of couples plummets the minute they become parents. And it gets worse before it gets better. In the long run, it is the most rewarding job of your life.

From talking and reading to infants to making values clear, parents exert enormous influence over their children's development. They are, however, not the only influences, especially after children enter school. It's especially important that parents give children a good start, but it's also important for parents to recognize that kids come into the world with their own temperaments, and it is the parents' job to provide an interface with the world that eventually prepares a child for complete independence. In a rapidly changing world parenting seems subject to fads and changing styles, but the needs of child development as delineated by science remain relatively stable. 

Recent Posts on Parenting

All Electronic Devices Should Be Off the Thanksgiving Table

These are kids for whom it is not unusual to make a quick leap from the first awakening of sexual awareness to the first consummation of sexual experience. They haven’t had to wait for anything else--why wait for that?

Eating Disorders and Parenting at the Holidays

The holidays can be a triggering time for anyone who has struggled with an eating disorder. It can be difficult to maintain (or achieve) a healthy relationship to food at this time of the year. And if you're also a parent, you must manage these challenges as you support and nourish your children. It's no easy task.

Why and How to Practice Gratitude

Do you find yourself losing sight of what the holidays are all about? Check out these few tips on how to get back to practicing gratitude.

4 Steps to Prevent a Bad Divorce

By Wendy Paris on November 24, 2015 Splitopia
While we've all heard horror stories of expensive, nasty divorces, there are steps we can take to help ensure our own break-up does not follow that model.

9 Signs Your Child Has Entitlement Issues

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on November 23, 2015 Singletons
If you are an overly involved or protective parent, you probably feed into your child’s sense of entitlement with realizing it. Here, ways to measure the extent of your child or teen’s “Me, Me, Me” problem and turn the tide of entitlement.

Will Your Child Be Part of the Collateral Damage of Divorce?

Rather than looking at the negative consequences of divorce as fixed, we need to examine the origins of the problem – the so-called pathogenesis – to recognize that these consequences are the results of symptoms acquired over the course of a child’s lifetime.

Want Your Kids to Start Listening to You? Stop Doing This!

A new, healthier way of looking at discipline.

Going Screenfree: Sheer Madness or Sheer Genius?

Whether a parent senses screen-time is having a negative impact on a child or simply feels there's way too much of it, constantly managing electronics use can drive parents crazy. Here are three tips to help parents go from thinking "something needs to change" to taking decisive action.

The Unparented Child

Wrong child/wrong parent: how to heal a mismatch and champion your neglected inner child

Why Are Media Beauty Ideals Toxic for Our Daughters?

It is important for parents to know that there is a direct relationship between the amount of time that girls spend viewing media images and whether or not they will have negative body image. And we know that negative body image is related to many other problems like low self-esteem, depression, excessive dieting, and eating disorders. Some practical strategies to try.

Teaching Tolerance in a Time of Terror

It may seem easy to counteract chaos and unrest resulting from terrorist attacks by pointing fingers at entire groups. We need to be clear about what such stances communicate especially to our children.

Rethinking John B. Watson's Legacy

Should Watson be taught to students as a cautionary tale? In tracing his research, it becomes clear that in addition to ethically questionable studies, Watson was promoting problematic and dangerous assertions regarding child rearing without legitimate support for any of his claims.

Best Interests of the Child: Standards & Parental Alienation

Best Interest of the Child Standards do not protect children from parental alienation.

The Social Side of Touch

By Lydia Denworth on November 19, 2015 Brain Waves
What's in a mother's caress? A set of specialized nerve fibers may help to explain why holding babies builds attachment.

Parental Pressure Takes a Toll on Young Athletes

Emphasizing whether a child wins or loses in a sport harms self-esteem.

The New Date Night: Dinner and...Therapy?

With date nights occurring so rarely, many couples want to take advantage of their limited time together. They may want to talk, but forget how. Therapy can provide a safe, sympathetic and constructive environment where couples can express their wants and needs within a relationship, relieving the expectation to tackle each issue while they are in a more social setting.

5 Tips to Help Children Cope with Threats of Terrorism

Our country has constantly been on alert of terror threats and many families have to find the best way to talk with their children about potential crisis.

Teen Sexting vs. Child Pornography

The simple truth is teen sexting is relatively common — a fact that really shouldn’t surprise anyone. I mean, weren’t we all teenagers once upon a time, with raging hormones and bad ideas and weird thoughts about what is and isn’t appropriate sexual behavior?

How to Help Our Children Deal With the Terror of Terrorism

For all children, regardless of age, parents must offer support and reassurance in the wake of the terror of terrorism.

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 The Power of Prime
Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

Why Are Kids Sexting?

By Leonard Sax M.D., Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 Sax on Sex
Why do girls and boys send sexy photos? The answers for girls are different from the answers for boys.

Should We Let Kids Study What Interests Them?

By Garth Sundem on November 17, 2015 Brain Trust
Does a child's intrinsic motivation increase math scores? Of course it does! That is, unless you look at the science.

How to Persuade Defiant Teens Without Aggression

Certain types of beliefs promote or hinder access to solution-focused thinking, and a commitment to a non-aggression principle is a belief that promotes greater access to peaceful and effective solutions during conflicts.

Family Background, Creativity, and Genius

Is the intense motivation of creative persons and geniuses, as manifested by months- or years-long devotions to a project in science, art, or other fields, due to inheritance or other family background factors? I describe a controlled empirical study of 435 Nobel laureates in science and 215 literary prizewinners.

Terror on the Tube: Background Television & Little Ones

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on November 16, 2015 Screen Time
Recently, Paris came under attack to a horrific set of events. While most young children are not sitting down to watch the evening news, a fair set of households do keep television news on in the background. Encourage children to talk about what they have viewed either in the foreground or the background can help.

Some Parenting Practices With Your Adolescent to Consider

The approaches parents use to stay meaningfully and influentially connected to their adolescent are numerous, and necessarily so in a relationship that never stops growing in complexity.

Three Words We Must Tell Our Kids Other Than, "I Love You!"

Scoring a goal in sports, getting great grades or having a wonderful dance recital alone will not give your child a lasting sense of value!

Our Families: What's Missing?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on November 15, 2015 Living Single
In this guest post, sociologist Joshua Gamson takes a look at the beautifully produced Tylenol ads celebrating family diversity, and explores what's missing or hidden.

Your Child's Brain on Books

By Elaine Reese Ph.D. on November 14, 2015 Tell Me a Story
Reading books to young children is an everyday activity in many households. New research offers clues on how picturebook reading is important for your child's brain development.

Fathers and Daughters

By Nick Luxmoore on November 14, 2015 Young People Up Close
Growing older, daughters need their fathers differently.