All About Neuroticism

Self-deprecating comedians and complainers wear their neuroticism as a badge of honor. In truth, the negatively biased are more prone to depression, anxiety, self-consciousness and hypochondria, to name just a few behavioral tripwires. Neuroticism is no fun for anyone. The good news: all personality traits, including emotional instability, exist on a continuum, in this case from the very neurotic to the implacably stable. If you can laugh at your hang-ups, you're probably not that neurotic to begin with.

Recent posts on Neuroticism

On the Malignant Nature of Narcissism

By Stephen A. Diamond Ph.D. on August 07, 2016 in Evil Deeds
Should presidential candidates be required to undergo a psychological evaluation?

How Your Personality Traits Predict Your Love Life

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on August 02, 2016 in Insight Therapy
In love and sex too, character is destiny.

Time Alone Saps the Willpower of People Who Are Neurotic

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Living Single
For some people, time alone is rejuvenating. New research shows that for neurotic people, just thinking about spending time by themselves can instead undermine their motivation.

How to Get Over an Ex (and 2 Major Mistakes to Avoid)

When faced with the loss of a relationship we tend to vilify or idealize our ex. There is a way out of this obsessive thinking that will help you to heal faster.

How Symptoms are Solutions

By Susan Rako M.D. on May 25, 2016 in More Light
Worrying seems to be purposeless suffering. It's actually a solution to existential pain.

The Myth of the Addictive Personality

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on May 11, 2016 in In Excess
The concept of 'addictive personality' is often used to explain addictive behaviour. This article argues that the concept of addictive personality is a complete myth.

Social Anxiety: Mapping Its 7 Key Components

These key elements help us understand social anxiety.

Just How Different Are Cat People and Dog People?

The commonly held belief that cat people and dog people differ in fundamental ways, put to the test in earlier research, may need to be revisited.

How to Not Pass Along Our "Stuff" to Our Children

By Abigail Brenner M.D. on March 30, 2016 in In Flux
We go through life dealing with our own anxieties, neuroses, issues, and problems.What happens when we don't fully deal with our own issues? Do our children "inherit" them from us?

Victimology: The New Way to Play the Blame Game

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on March 29, 2016 in Memory Medic
The need to walk on eggshells in social interactions makes us isolate ourselves into enclaves of like-minded people.

Clarifying the Nature of Anxiety and Depression

This blog clarifies some points following the first principle that anxiety and depression are symptoms of threats to or losses of core psychological/relational needs.

Why Is Neuroticism So Toxic?

By Christopher Bergland on February 03, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroticism is widely considered the most toxic of the "Big Five" personality traits. Read this blog post for some easy tips on how-to become less neurotic.

5 Ways to Get out of the Indecisiveness Trap

We are constantly making decisions but for some people, these come harder than for others. Find out what to do when you're stuck in the indecisiveness trap.
Wikimedia Commons

Personality Profiles of Great American Presidents

A study finds that presidential greatness is associated with a mix of bright and dark traits. Great presidents have been compassionate yet also knew how to manipulate people.

How Scary Are the Mental Health Risks of Vegetarianism?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on December 15, 2015 in Animals and Us
While most vegetarians don't have histories of psychiatric disorders, some studies have linked meat-avoidance with mental illness. But how strong is the link and why does it exist?

Choosing a Therapy and a Therapist

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on December 14, 2015 in A Sideways View
How do you go to when you have a problem? Why do some therapies and treatments seem to work so much better than others? Are there some ingredients that are common to nearly all?

Personality's 'Big One' and the Enigma of Narcissism

Narcissists can be charismatic yet also alienate others. Narcissism combines adaptive and maladaptive traits. This makes it difficult to reconcile narcissism with the theory that all personality traits express a single underlying dimension such as a general factor of personality.

This Is the Key to Getting Over Worries

For most of us, there’s plenty to worry about in our lives. However, some people seem to figure out how to keep their worries down to a minimum.

Always Reward Your Writing Brain

By Susan Reynolds on October 30, 2015 in Prime Your Gray Cells
When you feel good, your brain releases and bathes itself in what are called the feel-good chemicals—dopamine, endorphins, serotonin, oxytocin, and others—which is so pleasurable for your brain that it eagerly awaits new opportunities to repeat this experience.
Diane Dreher

Why Don’t We Feel Safe?

Are you feeling anxious and isolated? You may just need more human contact.

Meet the Femme Fatale

By Rebecca Coffey on September 09, 2015 in The Bejeezus Out of Me
According to research from the University of Liverpool, narcissistic women often use emotionally manipulative tactics like threatening blackmail or vowing to harm themselves.

Ten Tips For People Who Second-Guess Themselves

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on August 19, 2015 in Ambigamy
"Why do I second guess myself so much?" Oops. There you go again.

Study Decodes the 5 Types of Facebook Status Updates

Want to know your personality type? A new study says your Facebook page says it all.

The Trouble With "Shame On You! You Shouldn't Feel That!"

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Ambigamy
Some people shun negative emotions to purge them. It doesn't work.

Wanting to Feel Good, Familiar or Useful?

But what about familar emotions? Do people like, and seek out, familiar emotions more than unfamilar ones? Or, do people merely seek out emotions that feel good?
The Independent

Regional Differences in Personality: Surprising Findings

Individual personality traits and the geographic region where one lives are correlated with important social outcomes. Research has found that personality traits are also geographically clustered in ways correlated with these same outcomes. Some of the results are surprising as the individual level and societal level correlates of personality can differ strikingly.
Piotr Marcinski/Shutterstock

The Psychology of Delusions

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in A Sideways View
What different types of delusions do people suffer from?

Choosing to Be Child-free

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in A Sideways View
More and more people in the west are choosing not to have children. Is this a puzzle for evolutionary psychologists? What does the research say on this topic?

What Your Facebook Use Reveals About Your Personality

Research shows the way you interact on social media says a lot about your personality and your self-esteem.

Are Women More Emotional Than Men?

Is There Evidence of Women’s Greater Negative Emotionality All Around the World?