The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

The Blue/White Black/Gold Dress Controversy: No One Is Right

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in A Logical Take
The Blue/White Black/Gold dress controversy reveals more than meets the eye.

Schizophrenia and Violence, Part II

By Betsy Seifter Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Schizophrenia Diary
The insanity defense fails again, but mentally ill offenders need treatment, not punishment.

Does Neuroimaging Provide the Ultimate Answers?

By Daniel Voyer Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Perceptual Asymmetries
Does the state of knowledge and methodology on neuroimaging warrant the confidence we have on results obtained with these methods?

Social Intelligence and Nonverbal Communications

By Joe Navarro M.A. on February 27, 2015 in Spycatcher
Why exercising social intelligence matters and why it can dominate a news cycle

Born to Gossip

By David Ludden Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Talking Apes
Since our brains are finely tuned for coordinating our relationships with others, it’s not surprising that language is structured to convey social information.

Why the "Eat Less, Move More" Approach Often Fails

Why the "Eat Less, Move More" Approach Often Fails. Not all calories are the same, By Susan Kolod, Ph.D.

3 Fascinating Ways To Improve Your Wellbeing

When it comes to improving your wellbeing, what would you be willing to try? With studies suggesting, more than seventy percent of people around the world report they are struggling or suffering, as they face into each day ahead it’s clear many of us need a little extra help when it comes to thriving. So where does the science suggest starting?

Should We Fan the Romantic Flame?

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in In the Name of Love
All human experiences, including romantic ones, can be boring. The remedy for boredom is often change and novelty. Should we then change our romantic partners in order to fan our romantic flames? Although change is indeed essential to emotional intensity, there are several types of changes, and emotional intensity is far from being the whole story when it comes to romance.

They Talk, We Listen

By G.A. Bradshaw Ph.D., Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Bear in Mind
"I don’t know what happened, my Sweet Girl is gone. Yesterday she left in the morning and didn’t even say good-bye. She just left. I waited all day yesterday and she never came home, and today she’s still not home. I am really, really sad. I don’t even know what I am going to do with myself."

Does Science Really Say That Hot Guys Are Jerks?

There have been many recent media stories—with titles like "Science Says: Hot Guys Are A-Holes"—about a new study on attractiveness and behavior. I was lead author on this study, and I'll clarify here what our study really showed.

A Mother's Love: Myths, Misconceptions, and Truths

By Peg Streep on February 26, 2015 in Tech Support
Commonly held ideas about motherhood shape the dialogue we have culturally, get in the way of understanding parent-child conflict, and affect each of us individually by setting a high and sometimes impossible standard. Why it's time to banish some of the myths that animate the discussion and start a new conversation.

An Integrative Approach to Wellness Really Works

I had a cerebral bleed causing me to black out resulting in a serious automobile collision. Months later I had brain surgery. I was told by my doctors I was permanently brain damaged. Determined to get better, I set out on my journey to regain my life. So I experimented with a variety of different approaches to treatment, and got better!

The Psychology of Wonder

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Statistical Life
Who we are is a consequence of our internal model, and when we change that by learning something new, we change our understanding of ourselves.

Coping With Traumatic Brain Injury

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Talking About Trauma
Tricia Williams, a clinical neuropsychologist at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, explains how to improve child development and mental health for individuals coping with a TBI.

Is Sadomasochism a Uniquely Human Form of Sexuality?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Animals and Us
From an evolutionary point of view, the enjoyment of pain would seem to be maladaptive. Is there an animal analog of finding sexual satisfaction in being whipped, poked with needles, or having hot wax dripped on your skin?

Are People Naturally Scientific?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Hot Thought
Some social and developmental psychologists have claimed that people—even children—naturally think like scientists. I find this claim implausible because: people are naturally religious rather than scientific; everyday thinking frequently deviates from scientific reasoning; and science is a relatively recent cultural development.

You Can't Be Mad at Your Mind - Part 2

By Elizabeth R Thornton on February 25, 2015 in The Objective Leader
How often do you do this? You have the power to do this less by learning to be more objective!

What Do Scientists Know About Finding a Purpose in Life?

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on February 24, 2015 in Curious?
Providing information on the science of a purpose in life. heavy, beautiful, and of paramount importance

When Love Brings Pain - #3

Love is letting down your guard, and defensiveness is snapping it back up. You have good reason to be on guard sometimes, but defensiveness doesn’t get you what you want. Your partner quickly pulls up their guard too, and seconds later a good relationship is off the rails. Here are three alternative strategies.

What Makes it Easier to Be Kind to Strangers Than Loved Ones

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on February 24, 2015 in Off the Couch
Ann and Bob have been married for five years and, after trying to get pregnant for two years, have just had their first baby. Their friends and family are all thrilled for them. And while they are both excited to be parents at last, they are also exhausted, anxious and miserable.

Malignant Narcissism and the Murder of a Parent

By Carrie Barron M.D. on February 24, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
This blog explores Malignant Narcissism and the damaging impact that it can have on family members and others.

3 Myths About Eating Disorders Debunked

By Nicole Avena Ph.D. on February 24, 2015 in Food Junkie
Eating disorders can be very difficult to understand. In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, take some time to learn a bit more about these disorders and the truth behind a handful of myths that surround them.

Dogs Don't Believe Information From Liars

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 24, 2015 in Canine Corner
Dogs keep track of whether people lie or tell the truth, and they use these memories to determine whether they can trust particular humans and any new information that they get from them.

Empire: A New Model for Bipolar Disorder on TV

By Ruth C. White Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Culture in Mind
Empire is a new hit TV show on the Fox Network that not only breaks ground as a black family drama based in hip-hop culture, but it shows a rare character with bipolar disorder who is not falling apart at the seams. Andre, the eldest son of a family music dynasty, has a degree from an elite school and (so far) successfully runs the family's multi-faceted business empire.

Oliver Sacks and Creative Arts Therapies

Many colleagues in the fields of creative arts therapies were sad to read Oliver Sacks’ recent and poignant essay in the Op-Ed section of The New York Times about the return of his cancer and his thoughts about death. And here's why his body of work continues to impact the fields of art therapy, music therapy, and other expressive therapies.

Traveling Through Time

By Dr. Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Our ability to mentally travel back and forward in time gives us our sense of self and enhances our lives and coping abilities in many ways.

How to Encourage Non-Liberal Students in Psychology

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Rabble Rouser
How do you encourage non-liberal students to pursue careers in the social sciences? It is simple. Stop being hostile to them and their ideas. What a shock. If one creates an environment safe and supportive for all students, regardless of their politics, non-left students become interested in psychology.

What Is the Best Diet for Mood?

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on February 23, 2015 in Inner Source
Which diet is the healthiest for your brain and mood?

How Technology is Tricking You Into Tipping More

By Nir Eyal on February 23, 2015 in Automatic You
Digital payment systems use subtle tactics to increase tips, and while it’s certainly good for hard-working service workers, it may not be so good for your wallet. Here's the hidden psychology of why you unconsciously pay more.