The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

Are We Over Simplifying Our Wellbeing?

Do you struggle sometimes to maintain your wellbeing? Does it feel like circumstances around you just seem to keep pulling you down?

3 Ways Millennials Can Manage Their Ambition-Related Stress

By Caroline Beaton on May 28, 2017 in The Gen-Y Guide
Though responsible for great success and progress, ambition can also cause feelings of worthlessness, mania and anxiety. Neuroscience now explains why.
Rob Schofield, Flickr

Can You Hear What You See? More So Than You Imagine

Perception may be due for a redefinition. Our eyes see, but vision can apparently also hear. Tactile receptors can also taste. We may all have a bit of synesthesia in us.

Beyond the Veil: Synchronicity and Near Death Experiences

How the perspective gained from NDEs helps to explain some coincidences.

This Is What Happens to Your Brain When You Fail

By Caroline Beaton on May 25, 2017 in The Gen-Y Guide
Not only is this kind of failure spiral common; it's biological.
Paul Nunez

What Makes the Human Brain “Human?” Part 2

How do “small world” connections contribute to brain complexity and a healthy mind?

Animal Anger

Anger is the impulse to go toward a threat instead of running from it. A surge of testosterone overrides the cortisol. Here's how to relieve those threatened feelings.

Are Dogs Self-Aware?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on May 24, 2017 in The Human Beast
The standard test of self-awareness is being able to recognize ourselves in a mirror. Although chimpanzees pass this test with flying colors, dogs flunk.

A Summer Project: Improve Your Handwriting

Learning any new skill changes your brain. Want a new project for the summer? Improve your handwriting. It will help your math and make you a more effective learner.

Twenty Billion Fails to "Move the Needle" on Mental Illness

Former NIMH Head with remarkable admission: $20 billion in taxpayer dollars fails to move the needle on mental illness.

What Does Prayer Do? What Does Love Do?

The two aspects of human consciousness that must be experienced and their psychological significance personally understood if one is to become psychically whole.

The Price of Being a Loner

By Barb Cohen on May 21, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Without a social brain, imperfection is never “normalized;” the soothing mantra “Everybody feels this way sometimes” cannot be internalized.

Anxious? There Are Two Ways To Go

Some believe the way to deal with anxiety is to replace uncertainty with certainty that what is feared can't happen. That is not the way the brain is supposed to work.

Forever Now

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2017 in Memory Medic
The usually benign herpes simplex virus is not always so benign.
unsplash.com/pexels.com

Rest for Success

It's not what you do—it's how you actively rest.

Narrative Expressive Journaling Could Help Your Vagus Nerve

A new study found that "narrative expressive journaling" (in which you create a storyline with self-distancing) reduces stress better than extremely emotional "expressive writing."

Chris Cornell: When Suicide Doesn’t Make Sense

What might have been happening inside the rock star's mind.

Negotiating with Your Teenager

Your child is not your enemy. You have to be willing to negotiate and prepare your own thoughts and reasons for why you say what you do and to share those reasons with your child.

Face-to-Face Connectedness, Oxytocin, and Your Vagus Nerve

A new study reports that oxytocin "love hormone" levels surge during a romantic crisis. These findings reaffirm a link between the vagus nerve and our need to "tend-and-befriend."

Is a Vegetarian Diet Always Healthy?

My advice would be to limit everything from a cow (and any other red meat source) and be very careful about obtaining a balance of the nutrients.

Tonic Levels of Physical Activity Stimulate Your Vagus Nerve

Moderate physical activity is a guaranteed way to engage your vagus nerve and create a "relaxation response" that counters the panic and anxiety of fight-or-flight responses.
pixabay.com

Required Summer Reading

In a landmark study of why human beings believe what they believe and do what they do, Robert Sapolsky demonstrates that brains and cultures evolve; genes don't determine anything.

I Have Seen Your Brain and It Might Not Be So Pretty

Can a specialized scan of your brain tell us if you are awake and aware? If you are a nice person or a psychopath?

Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercises and Your Vagus Nerve

Diaphragmatic breathing is one of the easiest ways to engage your vagus nerve and create a "relaxation response" that counters the panic and anxiety of fight-or-flight responses.

Yoga Lifts Depression & Helps You Flex when Wound Too Tight

Controlling your breath can open the space that allows you to control your mood without any conscious effort on your part.

Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome: Subclinical Version

Can cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome be inherited? Do subtle versions live among us?

Brain Abnormalities In Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

New research on white matter alterations in adults with OCD

A Vagus Nerve Survival Guide to Combat Fight-or-Flight Urges

The vagus nerve's ability to lower stress and reduce inflammation has been underutilized for too long. This post offers nine easy "vagal maneuvers" to stimulate your vagus nerve.

Let’s Make an Effort to Be More Reflective and Less Reactive

We cannot be reflective while in a reactive state, because it interferes with our listening abilities and lends itself to misleading accounts and impressions.