The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

Methylfolate and Resistant Depression

The evidence mounts that methylfolate can be an effective augmenting agent for depression. What do we know about this vitamin, and what are the questions and possible pitfalls?

The New Science of Empathic Accuracy Could Transform Society

Contrary to popular belief, new research shows that the ability to interpret other people's emotions accurately requires more cerebral thinking and less intuition.

Who is That Big, Green Judging Machine?

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on July 23, 2016 in Wander Woman
Judging and criticizing can be exhausting. So why does your brain thrive on hurling insults? Learn why and what you can do to gain peace of mind and better relationships.
pixabay.com/pexels.com

Is the Brain Like Muscle?

Grow your legs, grow your brain.
K. Ramsland

Packing Heat: Writing about Sex

Writing a sex scene is like playing jazz: you shut down lose self-censorship.

Teach Your Brain to Like the Job Search

By Katharine Brooks Ed.D. on July 22, 2016 in Career Transitions
If we can help our brains tap into our natural curiosity and desire to learn, we can find ways to quiet the lizard.

Why Your Brain Hates the Job Search

By Katharine Brooks Ed.D. on July 22, 2016 in Career Transitions
The job search process is fraught with psychological landmines— fears of rejection, bouts of procrastination, self-esteem challenges, and attacks of perfectionism.

Can You Teach Someone to Love Their Job?

Confucius advised: “Choose a job you love and you will never work a day in your life.” Steve Jobs agreed, counseling: “The only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

What Is the Best Path Forward After Terrorism?

Our mind makes intuitive mistakes about how to deal with terrorism in the best manner. This article uses insights from neuroscience to show the best path to deal with terrorism.

Just Being Near You Is Rewarding for Dogs

A new study suggests that dogs find merely being near humans to be rewarding even without any social interactions.

How Couples Misunderstand Each Other

A heart-breaking experience of counseling couples is seeing good people suffer due to the entirely avoidable illusion of sameness.
stocksy.com

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

Is grit over-rated? As Angela Duckworth's new book Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance dominates the best-seller charts some interesting questions are starting to be asked.

A 60 Second Journey Deep Into Your Unconscious

Venture into the unknown...if you dare!

Sitting Is the New Smoking and Mindfulness Is the New Black

The Aspen Brain Lab convenes experts on living life to its fullest

What's All the Anger About?

Taking that first step toward "healthy anger"

Stronger Drugs, Stronger Placebos

By Peter D Kramer on July 19, 2016 in In Practice
New research is elucidating the biological underpinnings of the placebo response. The results might enhance our appreciation of real—inherently effective—medications.

Epigenetic Mechanism in the Cerebellum Drives Motor Learning

New research pinpoints how we learn new motor skills such as riding a bicycle, playing the piano, driving a car, etc.

What Do You Think About When You First Wake Up?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on July 18, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
When waking from sleep, try to be aware of your deep purpose, or aspiration, or guiding light. Find refuge in things that support you by taking a moment and letting it sink in.

Future Thinking and False Memories

Have you ever had a vivid memory that turned out to be false? New research suggests that false memories may actually be associated with a number of positive psychological traits.

Bird Brains: Size Doesn't Matter But Number of Neurons Does

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 16, 2016 in Animal Emotions
New research shows that "large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence."

Dad's Psychological Well-Being Impacts His Kids' Development

New research illuminates the impact a father's stress levels and mental health have on his children.

The Opioid Epidemic and Our Children

The opioid addiction crisis is laying waste to families and communities. Children inevitably become victims. Research on treatment and child protection is just catching up.

The 4 Stages of Unplugging a Child's Brain

By Garth Sundem on July 15, 2016 in Brain Trust
We've all seen research on kids and screen time. Here's what it really looks like to unplug.

The Psychology of Scientific Advancement

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 15, 2016 in How To Do Life
An interview with Michio Kaku

How to Change Unhealthy Habits

Are you tired of your unhealthy habits? If you're ready to make a change, here are 10 clear steps to changing old habits that aren't serving you.

Another Look at Psychiatric Diagnosis

Have you or anyone you know been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder? Peer behind the curtains of this system.

Which Emotions Do We See in Dogs and Cats?

New data looks at the basic and complex emotions that pet owners observe in their own dogs and cats.
pixabay.org

Creating Fictional Worlds That Feel Real

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Rethinking Thought
When you read a novel, do you know what color hair each characters has?

The Anti-Psychologists

By Stanton Peele on July 13, 2016 in Addiction in Society
Psychology has been engaged in a decades-long battle for its soul—is it really a field independent of brain psychology? I sometimes view myself one of psychology's last advocates.