The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

What Are Migraines, Exactly?

By Jordan Gaines Lewis, Ph.D. on October 24, 2016 in Brain Babble
What exactly are migraines, and how are they different from headaches?

Personality and the Brain, Part 8

Knowing how the brain works, how it specializes for certain tasks and what triggers changes in the brain’s structural connections can help you change your personality.

When Anxiety Means Suffering, Can Therapy Really Help?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 23, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Some therapists intuitively help clients develop right brain self-regulation. Therapists who are not relationally intuitive apply "paint-by-numbers" therapy learned in grad school.

"Help Me Stop Thinking About My Ex Girlfriend"

"She’s all fine and dandy, and I struggle with this every day," Jim said after his girlfriend of several years broke up with him. Read on to find out how people like Jim can cope.

Personality and the Brain, Part 7

After his injury, music literally draws Derek Amato's attention away from other tasks he has to perform.

Can Novels Influence Our Beliefs About Reality?

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in Trouble in Mind
Joyce Carol Oates’s depiction of an amnesiac, loosely based on HM, perpetuates negative stereotypes about women scientists.

Election Stress Disorder

By Stan Tatkin Psy.D. on October 22, 2016 in The Puzzle of Love
Americans are suffering emotionally due to the caustic nature of the election, and our brains offer both the explanation and the solution.
Pixabay are released under Creative Commons CC0

Why Is It Impossible to Not Judge People?

It is impossible to meet someone and make zero internal judgments about them. Just like it is impossible to look at a word and not read it.

Psychopaths Can Actually Be Creative People

Psychopathy, a trait associated with antisocial qualities, may show up in a prosocial form among creative people. New research shows the physiology supporting this intriguing link.

Personality and the Brain, Part 6

After his brain injury, Derek Amato became more agreeable and empathetic, suggesting that personality is not set in stone.

Personality and the Brain, Part 5

People's psychic abilities can be explained by a peculiar crossing of the senses.
By Nogas1974 (Own work), via Wikimedia Commons This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

Biology Determines Every Thought, Feeling, and Behavior

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Cui Bono
Psychologists say behavior results from the interaction of biology and environment, yet argue about their relative importance. Read why the importance of biology is always 100%.

The Ageless Inspiration of Activity

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
Ever thought you were too old for something? Aging doesn't mean we have to get old. Getting old comes with all sorts of baggage that isn't a requirement of aging.

You Have Power Over Your Brain Chemistry

Your brain has an operating system inherited from earlier animals. It rewards you with "happy chemicals" when you step toward meeting needs and alarms you with "unhappy chemicals.

Can You Come Home to Yourself?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
Meditation is the quintessential training of attention. Getting better control of your attention is the foundation of changing your brain, and thus your life, for the better.

Risky Teenage Behavior Linked to Imbalanced Brain Activity

By Christopher Bergland on October 20, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Dartmouth pinpoints the brain mechanisms linked to risk-taking and impulse control during adolescence. This discovery explains why teenagers are often reckless.

Personality and the Brain, Part 4

When the bossy left hemisphere is “shushed” and the creative right brain is allowed to “speak,” artistic talent proliferates.

Why Community Support Is Important With Orphan Diseases

A community comes together for brain tumor research.

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” to improve cognitive skills. But does it work?

Sexual Assault Stories Flood the Internet—Now the Next Step

By Marty Babits on October 19, 2016 in The Middle Ground
Many thousands of women are giving voice to painful experiences of traumatic assault. Many are mobilized now for more intensive healing. Find out how they can follow through.

Personality and the Brain, Part 3

When the connection between the emotional brain and the front of the brain is damaged, people have trouble interpreting or feeling their emotions.

Groundbreaking Study Roots Out Signs of Depression in Brain

By Christopher Bergland on October 18, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
This pioneering discovery could lead to more effective treatments for depression.

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Personality and the Brain, Part 1

One evening on October 11, 2009, life took a dramatic turn for 41-year-old Leigh Erceg.

Your Amygdala May House Both Positive and Negative Memories

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Positive and negative memories may be housed in specific regions of the amygdala, according to a new mice study. These findings offer many clues for overcoming negativity and fear.

Why We Fear

By Nathan H. Lents, Ph.D. on October 17, 2016 in Beastly Behavior
Researchers have found that it is easier to train humans and other primates to fear snakes than other dangers, indicating a genetic predisposition for the fear of snakes.

A Drug to Improve Performance and Creativity

If study drugs give you a significant cognitive advantage, do you "cheat" if you take them? Do you become a different person?

Claustrophobia: Cause and Cure

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 16, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
On top of a building, the most direct escape is to jump, a thought that can trigger panic and make stairs and elevators seem impossible to navigate. The answer: alarm attenuation

What Is Positive Psychology?

How do you explain what positive psychology is to others?