The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

Repression of Women: What Does Biology Tell Us?

The origins of gender inequality go way back into our biological history. The evolution of the human brain has enabled us to develop increasingly effective ways of dealing with it.

Digital Distraction: Internet and Smartphone Addiction

The Internet and smartphones have been adopted in the U.S. at a faster pace than any technology since the start of the Industrial Revolution, and we can't seem to stop using them.

A Case for Neural Augmentation

By Eric Leuthardt M.D. on October 20, 2017 in Mind Blender
In an era when information is expanding exponentially, we may have to modify our brains to keep up.

Tap Into the Inner Genius You Didn’t Know You Had

Research show that genius is inside each of us, but how can we access it?

Killing Your Performance Rankings? How to Ensure Success

By David Rock on October 19, 2017 in Your Brain at Work
Want to kill your performance rankings? These tips, rooted in neuroscience, can help you do it the right way.

A Political Prescription for Donald Trump's Brain

By Hara Estroff Marano on October 18, 2017 in Brainstorm
Mental health experts go beyond warning of the dangers of Donald Trump's presidency to take political action.

Why Do Dogs Have Cold, Wet Noses?

A dog's wet nose can improve his scenting ability but it also does more than that.

The Loneliest Neuron

By Mark D. Humphries Ph.D. on October 17, 2017 in Neural Processing
Why doesn't every neuron know about everything?

Move Over, Gray Matter—White Matter Is Taking Center Stage

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
One of the largest studies of white matter (which enables communication between brain regions) ever was published today by scientists from the University of Southern California.

Stress Makes It Harder to Recognize Danger

By Lydia Denworth on October 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
Sometimes stress heightens our awareness, but more often, it dulls our ability to respond to new threats. Recognizing the risk and reducing sources of stress can help.

Nessa's Sense of Machines

By Maureen Seaberg on October 16, 2017 in Sensorium
Through history, people have strongly related to the inanimate. But in this generation, that's machines.

Vagus Nerve Facilitates Guts, Wits, and Grace Under Pressure

By Christopher Bergland on October 15, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There are dozens of easy ways to engage your vagus nerve that can inhibit "fight, flight, or freeze" stress responses, lower anxiety, and give you enough guts to seize the day.

Consciousness: How a Squishy Brain Connects to Make You, You

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Animal Emotions
How do 90 billion neurons interconnect to produce a wide variety of experiences? Your Conscious Mind, a new book for a general audience, covers what we know about consciousness.

Strange Sound Sickening Cuban Diplomats? Don’t Believe It.

By Robert Bartholomew Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in It's Catching
Mysterious "sonic attacks" on U.S. diplomats in Cuba are mass hysteria.

Unraveling the Teenage Mind

Adolescence can be a mystifying time for everyone. This new book can help.

Psilocybin May "Reset" Brain Circuitry of Depressed Patients

By Christopher Bergland on October 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Psilocybin may help "kick-start" recovery from treatment-resistant depression by "resetting" neural mechanisms, according to new fMRI brain imaging study.

Enhancing Athletic Performance With Brain Stimulation

New research shows that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves endurance performance and decreases perceived exertion among cyclists.

Getting Sentimental Could Increase Your Savings

By Brad Klontz Psy.D., CFP on October 12, 2017 in Mind Over Money
How can we harness positive, emotionally charged memories to develop a deeper incentive for saving?

Does Raising a Dog's Excitement Level Improve Performance?

Attempting to generate higher levels of motivation and excitement may be detrimental to the performance of some dogs based upon their personality or temperament.

Risk, Fear, and the Rise of Demagogues

By George Michelsen Foy on October 11, 2017 in Shut Up and Listen!
Politicians have traditionally appealed to our fight-or-flight reflex to save their political bacon. Donald Trump looks set to do the same.

Self-Soothing Skills Learned in Childhood

Here are some curious childhood stress relievers that will help you identify your own. Your early habits are pathways in your brain that you can build onto today.

When You Love or Hate An Addict You Can Recover, Too

"Talking to a loved one before it's too late could make such a difference and prevent decades of unnecessary malevolence toward a person who cannot help himself."

How to Train Your Brain to Think Differently

Studies show you can physically change your brain by changing the way you think. Here are three strategies that will train your brain to think differently.
Anthony/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

How Your Brain Takes Good Ideas and Makes Them Better

By Guest Blogger on October 10, 2017 in The Guest Room
Bending, breaking, and blending are enduring tools for innovation.

The Art of Nostalgia

Nostalgia is an aesthetic form of memory, and our relation to our nostalgic memories is much like that of a painter to a work of art.

How to Deal with Takers at Work

Are you struggling to deal with someone whose only interest is to take from others so they can make themselves look better? What’s the best way to deal with a taker at work?

Synchronizing Brain Waves Can Turbocharge Executive Function

By Christopher Bergland on October 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A pioneering new study has identified a surprising way to turbocharge executive functions. Someday, this method could be used to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

What to Do When Doctors Haven't Helped You

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
A new approach when the old ones fail.

Can You Take A Moment?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Your Wise Brain
Stop the urgency of the day and let a quiet fill the air let your thoughts slow down. There is presence in this moment, and no worries about the future.

Our Search for Meaning Produces Universal Neural Signatures

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A pioneering new fMRI brain imaging study from USC illuminates our human commonality and the universality of our search for meaning in the stories we read.