The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

What the Heck is a Claustrum?

An announcement at the BRAIN initiative meeting highlights a small brain structure with surprising integration with the rest of the mouse brain. So is it involved in consciousness?

Can You Improve Adult ADHD Without Medications?

Do you have Adult ADHD? Are there non-medication treatments? Have you tried medications but experience too many side effects or only partial benefit?

If You Go to the Hospital, Get Ready To Yell…

By Peter Edelstein M.D. on February 26, 2017 in Patient Power
Studies show that healthcare in the U.S. is far poorer than most people realize, and sadly, sometimes you need to yell to protect yourself or a loved one. But how do you know?

A New Paradigm for Psychiatry

The UN has put out a call for a new paradigm for psychiatry, “that could replace the failed medical model that dominates mental health today.”

Regular Aerobic Exercise in Midlife Protects the Aging Brain

By Christopher Bergland on February 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Regular aerobic exercise benefits the brain in surprising ways. New research suggests that regular aerobic exercise in midlife can optimize blood flow networks as the brain ages.

Dreading Something? Tylenol Might Dull the Pain

Dread has been declared the most difficult emotion to tolerate. And researchers have found acetaminophen could actually dull the emotional pain.

The Neuroscience of Wanting and Pleasure

If you feel like you are running out of steam, it is OK! Motivation goes up and down. If the tide was high all the time, we would fail to see the beauty of calm oceans.

Entranced

By Robert J King Ph.D. on February 23, 2017 in Hive Mind
Getting in "sync" with a partner may not be a euphemism. Orgasms can help us achieve this, the latest research implies.

Are There Behavior Changes When Dogs Are Spayed or Neutered?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 22, 2017 in Canine Corner
Data shows that spaying or neutering dogs may not reduce behavior problems but actually tends to increase them.
Svitlana-ua/Shutterstock

To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

4 Ways to Train Your Brain to Think Like a Champion

Your brain can be your best asset or your worst enemy. It's important to train it well.

Malignant Narcissism: Collision of Two Personality Disorders

By Rhonda Freeman Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in NeuroSagacity
Those who interact with malignant narcissists consider them jealous, petty, thin-skinned, punitive, hateful, cunning, and angry.

Highly Creative People Have Well-Connected Brain Hemispheres

By Christopher Bergland on February 21, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
People who are highly creative have better connectivity between the left and right brain hemispheres, according to a new study by a team of international researchers.

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now?

Have you started opening the newspapers each day with a sense of dread and disbelief about that latest actions of President Trump and his administration?

What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

A brain region known as the basal ganglia appears to be important in treating and understanding obsessive compulsive disorder.

The timing of free will

By Marc Wittmann Ph.D. on February 18, 2017 in Sense of Time
Why the famous Libet task does not touch on our notion of free will.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.
Paul Nunez

Are Some Scientists Serious About Denying Free Will?

A brief look at the issues of consciousness and free will.

3 Strategies to Talk With Kids About Suicidal Thoughts

There is no age limit for suicidal thoughts. Parents and healthcare professionals can learn to talk openly and safely with children about suicide.

Experimental Philosophy: Strengths and Limitations

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Hot Thought
Experimental philosophy is an important movement in which philosophers systematically collect data about how people think. It has 2 main strengths and 3 surmountable limitations.

World's First Clinical Trial Finds Diet Works for Depression

By Georgia Ede MD on February 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
Groundbreaking research proves that dietary choices have the power to help reduce and even reverse depression.

Have You Found The HERO In Your Team?

When your people are faced with challenges how do they generally respond?

Why Does Drinking Milk Ease the Pain of Eating Spicy Food?

By Jordan Gaines Lewis, Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Brain Babble
Why does milk soothe the savage serrano (and water doesn't)? Here's the science behind why a glass of cold milk eases the pain of spicy foods.
Erik Hans Krause in employ of WPA/PD-US-not renewed

"Refrigerator Mothering" Is Dead but the Blame Game Lives On

By Barb Cohen on February 16, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
The mother—and now the father too—are still suspect. Suspected of what? Nobody knows for sure, but whatever it is, we are expected to defend ourselves against it.
Jens Maus

Brain on Fire

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 16, 2017 in Decisions Teens Make
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been called one of the “best known but least understood” mental health conditions. Why is it so well known?

Are Antidepressant Withdrawal Symptoms Worth the Cure?

The lens of depression clouds your everyday view.

Do Nervous Dog Owners Have Nervous Dogs?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 16, 2017 in Canine Corner
Dog owners who have more neurotic personalities tend to have dogs who are nervous and cope with stress less efficiently, a new study finds.

Early Brain Over-Growth Is Indicative of Autism as Predicted

The imprinted brain theory links brain growth to autism, and a new study confirms the association.

Interpersonal Rules That Undermine Your Relationships #2

By Amy Banks on February 15, 2017 in Wired For Love
A longstanding myth in our culture is that only the fittest members of society flourish and procreate and that a person's survival and safety is dependent on individual strength.