The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe, and in many ways it's the final frontier of science. A hundred billion neurons, close to a quadrillion connections between them, and we don't even fully understand a single cell.

Neuroscience aims to understand how a person arises out of a clump of squishy matter. It's where psychology meets biology. And with new tools at our disposal—computer simulations, medical imaging—we double our knowledge every decade. Roll up your sleeves and poke around.

Recent posts on Neuroscience

Why Does God Want to Kill Me?

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in iAge
We are meant to die. It is nature's way of making our species survive. But our strategy as humans has been to develop a large brain and to live longer, to which there's a downside.

Quantitative Electroencephalography in Mental Health Care

Are you looking for a more advanced approach that can help you evaluate abnormal brain activity in OCD, depressed mood, or bipolar disorder? QEEG brain wave analysis could help.

Why We Need To Structure Our Days Differently Than We Think

Are you using your brain as effectively as you could be? A few changes can go a long way.

Dogs Who Live with Smokers May Suffer from Premature Aging

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 19, 2017 in Canine Corner
Biomarkers show that living in a home with a tobacco smoker prematurely ages dogs at a cellular level

What Creates Superior Brain Connectivity, According to Study

By Susan Reynolds on September 19, 2017 in Prime Your Gray Cells
Participants on the “positive” side reflected stronger connectivity associated with higher cognitive functions, including memory, language, introspection, and imagination.

Schizophrenia in a Vial? The Story of Ketamine

A back-of-the-shelf anesthetic induces all the symptoms of schizophrenia—but only in adults. What does this reveal about brain development and the nature of schizophrenia?

The Neurobiology of Fear-Based Learning—and Unlearning

By Christopher Bergland on September 19, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study identifies how the brain learns and unlearns fear.

Can You Make Organizational Change Easier?

Are you struggling to get people on board when it comes to embracing change in your organization? How can you work with people’s brains to make change easier?

How to Respond Effectively to a Young Person's Anger

"Do not teach your children never to be angry; teach them how to be angry."

Rewire Your Burned-Out Brain

By Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed. on September 18, 2017 in Radical Teaching
You can rewire your brain to reverse burnout symptoms and boost your optimism, pleasure, and positive expectations.

Seek Your Whys and Find Happiness.

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on September 17, 2017 in Trouble in Mind
Simon Sinek’s mission to encourage us to find the work that makes us happy can be extended to everything we do.

I Tried Direct Neurofeedback and the Results Surprised Me

By Zoltan Istvan on September 17, 2017 in The Transhumanist Philosopher
Recently, Grant Rudolph, Clinical Director at Echo Rock Neurotherapy, invited me to try his Direct Neurofeedback techniques.

Low Brain Cholesterol—Separating Fact from Fiction

By Georgia Ede MD on September 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
How vegan diets and cholesterol-lowering drugs affect mood and memory.

The Salvation of Psychiatry

By Robert Berezin M.D. on September 17, 2017 in The Theater of the Brain
Psychiatry should be grounded in that quest for truth. It has, however, lost its way.The Psychotherapy of Character is precisely this unified field theory for psychiatry

Right Brain and Left Brain Share Duties On "As Needed" Basis

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Growing evidence debunks the myth of creativity being seated in the "right brain." A new Duke study illuminates how the left brain and right brain can share duties when necessary.
Patrick Nygren/flickr

The Power of Placebo

By Steve Taylor Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Out of the Darkness
The placebo effect is more than belief - again and again, it has been shown to produce real physiological and neurological changes. Does this mean that the mind can heal the body?

iPhone X: Yes Or No?

By Susan Weinschenk Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Brain Wise
Whether or not you buy the new iPhone X depends in part on whether you are making a habit based decision or a value based decision.

The Sound of Memory

By Mark D. Humphries Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Neural Processing
"You must remember this song!" How your brain remembers what you hear

Hillary Clinton Is Doing Pranayama

Alternate nostril breathing is good for PTSD and mental health.

What It's Like to Be a Dog

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Animal Emotions
New MRI research shows startling similarities in what lights up animals' brains. Dogs, other nonhumans, and humans share neural processes involved in their thoughts and emotions.
Graphic Stock

How Melatonin Helps You Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Sleep Newzzz
Learn all about how melatonin can help sleep and bio time.

Garbage Smells Green and Gunshots Are Rainbows

Some people hear colors and see sounds, a phenomenon called synesthesia.
Mack Hicks

Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better

By Mack R. Hicks Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Digital Pandemic
Do our observations of gender differences hold up to scientific inquiry?

Millennial Men, Women and Casual Sex

Millennial men may not be hooking up as much as we think they are, but their attitudes towards women suggest a deeper problem

Should You Let Your Dog Sleep in Bed With You?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 14, 2017 in Canine Corner
A new study offers guidance on the choice to snuggle up with a favorite canine.

Why Changing Eating Habits (Permanently) Is So Hard

By Kari Anderson DBH, CEDS on September 13, 2017 in #BeHerNow
It’s complicated and primal, and it has everything to do with your brain trying to help you survive.

They Won't Stop Because They Can't Stop: Part 2

“It was like watching a movie, one where you know something bad is about to happen to the main character, and you hope that somehow he escapes danger." James B.

Non-invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation May Relieve Migraines

By Christopher Bergland on September 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
In 2002, doctors first noticed that implanted vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) devices relieved migraines. Now, a new handheld VNS device shows promise for headache sufferers.

Being Biased Impairs Brain Processing and Disrupts Learning

By Nick Hobson Ph.D. on September 12, 2017 in Ritual and the Brain
Group bias can impair your brain's learning function. Here's why your workplace should know this.

How Can Jobs, Housing, & Friends Aid Remission?

By John F. Kelly Ph.D. on September 12, 2017 in Addiction & Recovery 101
What effect do jobs, housing, and friends have on the brain of individuals in recovery from addiction?