How to Get Motivated

Motivation is literally the desire to do things. It's the difference between waking up before dawn to pound the pavement and lazing around the house all day. It's the crucial element in setting and attaining goals—and research shows you can influence your own levels of motivation and self-control. So figure out what you want, power through the pain period, and start being who you want to be.

Recent posts on Motivation

Does Climate Affect Economic Growth?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on August 30, 2016 in The Human Beast
Economic development goes along with a temperate climate, such as Europe's. Conversely, most of the poorest countries in the world are concentrated in the steamy tropics. Why?

How Optimism Can Affect Our Financial Decisions Adversely

Research shows optimists prefer risky investments, gamble to win & postpone saving money. But we can be optimistic and make good financial decisions at the same time.
K. Ramsland

What If Jack the Ripper Lived With You?

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on August 27, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
An early tale based on Jack the Ripper shows the subtle way in which people see what they need to see.
www.stocksy.com

Can You AMP Up Your Workplace?

When it comes to dealing with the complexity and uncertainty that are the new normal of business, how do people respond in your workplace?

10+ Ways Exercise Can Change Your Life

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on August 25, 2016 in Cravings
One of them is bound to give you the motivation you need to get moving.

To Bribe or Not to Bribe

Reading incentive programs, where students get points or prizes, and sometimes even grades, for reading “fun” books, are a ubiquitous feature of many literacy programs.

One Question You Need to Ask Yourself About Your Syllabus

Are you a college teacher? A small question might make you want to make big changes. It did for me.

Do Dogs Prefer Food or Praise?

A new study looks at whether dogs prefer food rewards more than social interaction with their owners by monitoring what goes on inside the dogs brain.

Ambition Versus Gratitude for What You Have

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 22, 2016 in How To Do Life
What to keep striving for and what to accept as-is?

Should Academic Achievement Be the Primary Goal of Education

We spend huge amounts of money determining whether schools are teaching academic material successfully. But is that the most important task for schools? Maybe not.

What's the 4-Letter Word Your Diet Might Be Missing?

By Gregg McBride on August 20, 2016 in The Weight-ing Game
Wanting a quick fix (which can include fads, pills or even surgery), some dieters often ignore the actual "work" it takes to successfully lose excess weight once and for all.

Can You Learn a Second Language After Childhood?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in Talking Apes
While it’s true that that it’s easier to learn a language when you’re young, adults can still learn languages with the right motivation.
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Who Are You?

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on August 18, 2016 in In Control
Angst, stress, and inner torment can arise when the goals of different mes are incompatible or even oppositional.

Culture Eats Strategy for Lunch. Every Time. Everywhere.

Budgeting a little time to explain things at work can help build momentum and support. And those can make the difference in success and failure, ultimately the bottom line.

The Joys of Going Off the Map

By Melody Warnick on August 17, 2016 in This Is Where You Belong
Can you navigate from point A to point B without a GPS? Allowing yourself to get distracted might help.
Courtesy Antônio Geraldo da Silva

When Work Can Be Damaging To Your Health

Companies should, through well-trained managers, pay attention to the behavior of their employees.

The Practical Benefits of a Wandering Mind

The next time you’re trying to concentrate and find your mind wandering off task, you might just want to let it go. New research suggests it may be helping you achieve your goals.

10 Ways to Get Yourself Moving

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on August 16, 2016 in Cravings
Looking for exercise motivation? Follow this easy path to fitness.

7 Toxic Behaviors of Highly Aggressive People at Work

Aggressive co-workers create problems you might never expect.

Why You Want to Be Stretched Outside Your Comfort Zone

By Craig Dowden Ph.D. on August 11, 2016 in The Leader's Code
While some of us may be concerned about stretching beyond our limits, research suggests that this practice can help us maximize our engagement and reach our potential.

Back to School, Back to Stress: 5 Tips for Autism Parents

For many parents of children with autism and special needs, the days and weeks leading to “Back to School” can be extremely nerve-wracking.

Faking It: Dissimulation, Dishonesty and Lying at Work

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on August 11, 2016 in A Sideways View
Rather than punish people for faking certain responses should we not reward them? Does it only depend on what, where and why we fake?
Lisa Cron

Brain Science for Writers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
A story coach's new book applies the neuroscience of storytelling in a practical how-to guide for writers.
Thomas L. Webb

The Road to Hell

By Thomas Webb Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in The Road to Hell
Why don't you cycle to work? (and why people struggle to achieve other goals)

One Drug-Free Way to Reduce Your Risk of 5 Chronic Diseases

By Christopher Bergland on August 09, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A study published today offers a drug-free prescriptive that could reduce your risk of 5 chronic diseases. The best news: this remedy is inexpensive and universally accessible.

Dog People Are Popular While Cat People Are Single

Data based on 160,000 Facebook users shows interesting differences in lifestyle, personality and personal preferences between dog people and cat people.

9 Habits That Can Keep You From Achieving Your Dreams

Your bad mental habits could be sabotaging your best efforts—and you might not even realize you're doing it.

Why Is Change So Hard?

Behavioral change is rarely a discrete or single event but we often make the mistake of viewing it this way.

Is Financial Nudging of American Consumers Backfiring?

Data from Vanguard’s “How America Saves 2016” report raises three red flags.

The Neuroprotective Powers of Exercise Should Motivate You

By Christopher Bergland on August 06, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Do you need a new source of motivation to become more physically active? If so, there is growing evidence that exercise increases brain size and reduces dementia risk as you age.